579 results for Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

  • Sing No Sad Songs

    Arnold, S. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Sunlight on water (short story)

    Arnold, S. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Sunlight on the water is an excerpt from a novel in progress: The Eshwell bridge witch project.

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  • Enhancing deliberate reflective practice through role play by using situated technology-enhanced learning with tablets

    Chan, S. (2013)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Situated technology-enhanced learning (STL) is a form of mobile learning requiring mobile hardware, storage of user generated data on web-based servers and wireless access to the internet to enhance learning in situated learning environments. The STL project reported in this paper used tablet videoing capability to record role-plays of hospitality students learning and practicing front-office procedures. Check-in and check-out procedures encompass complex customer relationship competencies requiring the learning of specialised practical skills and adoption of dispositional attributes. The pedagogical principles underpinning this project include deliberate practice, reflective learning, learner self-evaluation and appropriate peer or tutor feedback procedures. Effective deliberate practice, as described by Ericsson (2006) requires effortful engagement from learners and precise, timely feedback from peers or trainers. Practice underpinned by learner selfreflection and evaluation and motivation are also important contributors towards transformation of learners’ innate dispositional traits. Workroom / workshop observations, student focus group and evaluations and tutor interviews were conducted as the project progressed. Through analysis of data collated from four courses of the role-playing learning activity, guidelines have been produced. These guidelines assist students’ learning of self-evaluative skills; extend tutors’ use of role-playing as teaching strategy; and inform educational developers on creating appropriate STL activities. This paper represents work most relevant to the conference theme: The impacts of VET research on individual learners and groups of learners.

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  • Parental bereavement: From grief theory to a creative nonfiction perspective on grieving the death of a young adult child from cancer

    Arnold, S. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Waste management following earthquake disaster

    Brown, C. (2014)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Earthquakes can create large volumes of debris and solid waste. Depending on the severity of the earthquake and the nature of the built environment, waste volumes can be the equivalent of many times the annual waste generated by an affected community. Improved standards for built infrastructure are decreasing the probable impact of earthquakes in many communities. However, increased urbanisation and dependence on complex infrastructure networks increases a community’s vulnerability to a disaster. This also increases the likely amount of waste produced.

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  • Towards a social ontology of improvised sound work

    Russell, B. (2010)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Improvised sound work is one of the key areas of inter-generic hybridity in contemporary music. Any attempt to identify a social role and agree on a cultural meaning for such improvisational practice must grapple first with issues of definition. These issues are especially acute for emerging hybrid practices because their practical development outstrips the ability of the available critical/ideological structures to provide useful and generally agreed definitions for them.

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  • Gender and health promotion: a feminist perspective

    Yarwood, J. (2002)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Throughout the twentieth century feminist thinking underwent radical change as the women’s movement gained momentum. The social movement of feminism has embraced many guises, from liberal, to Marxist, to the postmodern. However, critical understanding of the experience of women’s oppression has remained the raison d’être of feminist thinking. The relevance of feminist scholarship within the interrelationship of gender and health care will be analysed and debated in this article, through the dominant discourse of health promotion.Throughout the twentieth century feminist thinking underwent radical change as the women’s movement gained momentum. The social movement of feminism has embraced many guises, from liberal, to Marxist, to the postmodern. However, critical understanding of the experience of women’s oppression has remained the raison d’être of feminist thinking. The relevance of feminist scholarship within the interrelationship of gender and health care will be analysed and debated in this article, through the dominant discourse of health promotion.

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  • An overview of the practice of IT governance

    Asgarkhani, M. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Investment on Information Technology (IT) solutions in most organizations accounts for the largest component of capital expenditure. Even though there are at times conflicting views on value and return regarding investment on IT, in general, there is consensus amongst strategists, planning advisors and many researchers that Investment in IT can bring significant value to business. Value is added through improved productivity, increased efficiency, profitability, better communication, more effective decision making and customer satisfaction. However, in order to maximize benefits and value gained from investment on IT, it is universally acknowledged that IT must be fully aligned with overall business strategies and direction. As capital investment on IT continues to grow, IT managers and strategists are expected to develop and put in practice effective decision making models (frameworks) that improve decision-making processes for the use of IT in organizations and optimize the investment on ICT solutions. More specifically, there is an expectation that organizations not only maximize the benefits of adopting IT solutions but also avoid the many pitfalls that are associated with rapid introduction of technological change. Different organizations depending on size, complexity of solutions required and processes used for financial management may use different techniques for managing strategic investment on IT solutions. Corporate IT governance encompasses the necessary organisational structures and processes to ensure the alignment of IT and business occurs whilst at the same time minimising any associated risks. Decision making processes for strategic use of IT within organizations are often referred to as IT Governance (or Corporate IT Governance). This research through examining and analysing recent studies aims to identify key factors for effective IT governance. The many benefits of IT governance are discussed along with suggestions for why implementation of governance systems can fail. The study examines IT governance as a tool for best practice in decision making on strategic use of IT. The study is concerned with phase I of a project intended to identify key components and success factors. It establishes that the practice of IT governance, depending on complexity of IT solutions, size of organization and organization’s stage of maturity in using IT varies significantly within various organizations. It can range from informal approaches to sophisticated formal frameworks. It is confirmed that there is no one standard framework for IT Governance that suits all organizations. Ownership and direction prove to be amongst essential elements to successful implementation of governance practices. Clearly defined roles and responsibilities tied with clear communication and continual senior management involvement were highlighted as significant success factors.

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  • Corporate ICT governance: A tool for ICT best practice

    Askgarkhani, M. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Today, investment on Information and Communication Technology (ICT) solution in most organizations is the largest component of capital expenditure. As capital investment on ICTs continues to grow, ICT managers and strategists are expected to develop and put in practice effective decision making models (frameworks) that improve decision-making processes for the use of ICTs in organizations and optimize the investment on ICT solutions. To be exact, there is an expectation that organizations not only maximize the benefits of adopting ICT solutions but alos avoid the many pitfalls that are associated with rapid introduction of technological change. Different organizations depending on size, complexity of solutions required and processes used for financial management and budgeting may use different techniques for managing strategic investment on ICT solutions. Decision making processes for strategic use of ICTs within organizations are often referred to as ICT Goverance (or Corporate ICT Governance). This paper examines ICT governance - as a tool for best practice in decision making about ICT Governance. Discussions in this paper represent phase 1 of a project which was initiated to investigate trends in strategic decision making about ICT strategies. Phase 1 is concerned mainly with review of literature and a number of case studies. It establishes that the practice of ICT goverance, depending on complexity of ICT solutions, organizations size and organizations stage of maturity varies significantly - from informal approaches to sophisticated formal frameworks.

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  • The City in a Different Light: rethinking the political through education by means of performance by people with intellectual disabilities

    McCaffrey, M. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    After the fatal earthquake of February 22nd 2011 Different Light Theatre company started meeting again on March 13th. Although the theatre space in which we held weekly classes, workshops and rehearsals was, like a lot of buildings, closed at that time, we were able to meet at the International Buddhist Centre on Riccarton Road. At the time a large part of the motivation for meeting so soon after the quake was in a way an attempt at ‘normalization’ in an extraordinary situation. We felt that the performers needed the routine of the classes or rehearsals to continue, amidst the disruption caused by the quake damage and aftershocks.

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  • Outsider influence and the utility of e-mail as an instrument for teaching in developing nations: a case study in Fiji

    Shanahan, M. W. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The impact of outsider influence in the advancement of human capital in developing nations is well documented1. This paper examines the utility of e-mail as a mechanism for delivery of outsider influence to middle managers in Fiji via a personal management development programme (PMDP). Thirteen participants took part in the PMDP over a six month period. The programme was aimed at enhancing their managerial skills by achievement of a series of negotiated objectives. There was one face-to-face meeting with each participant to set up the programme and negotiate objectives, and a second face-to-face meeting six weeks later to ensure all processes and systems were operational. During the six month duration of the programme, all other correspondence was limited to e-mail only.

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  • Sen's capability approach in designing and implementing poverty reduction programmes: promoting successful local application through focus groups

    Schischka, J. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    At a theoretical level there has been wide acceptance of Amartya Sen’s Capability Approach (CA) in development. However, questions remain regarding operationalization of the approach within the constraints participants and practitioners and other stakeholders face in designing and implementing poverty reduction programmes.

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  • Nurse peer group supervision: sharing the load

    Shaw-Brown, H. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Discusses how peer group supervision can offer support, shared learning and professional development for nurses in management and leadership roles.

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  • Living in stories: Creative nonfiction as an effective genre to write about death and bereavement

    Arnold, S. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Through the telling of stories and interaction with listener or audience, we give structure to our experience and create order and meaning. Written narrative is, therefore, a medium well suited to exploring the experience of death and bereavement. 'We live in stories, not statistics,' Gilbert says (2002: 223). Parents' stories of their children's deaths serve the same purpose as parents' stories of their living children's ongoing lives. Writing about the death of one's child is a way not only to continue bonds and help other bereaved parents, but also a way to allow the 'wounded storyteller' to give voice to the dead and facilitate catharsis in the teller. Utilising the techniques of creative nonfiction to write such a story, the writer can create a compelling narrative that allows writer and reader to enter 'the space of the story for the other' (Frank 1995: 18). This paper discusses the human affinity with story telling and the reasons the bereaved write their stories. It also defines the genre of creative nonfiction and outlines the history of its development. Finally it examines four creative nonfiction texts that have influenced my own writing on the topic of parental bereavement.

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  • The co-evolution of learning and internationalization strategy in international new ventures

    Pellegrino, J. M.; McNaughton, R.B. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In this paper, we examine the co-evolution of learning and internationalization strategy in international new ventures (INVs). Many researchers have suggested that in contrast to the reliance on experiential knowledge by firms that internationalize incrementally, firms that internationalize rapidly use alternatives such as congenital and vicarious learning. However, few empirical studies explicitly examine how the use of learning processes in INVs evolves. We used retrospective longitudinal analysis to explore the learning processes of four New Zealand-based INVs, and found that their dominant learning mode and foci of learning changed as internationalization increased. Around the time of founding, congenital learning dominated, but as the firms began to internationalize, they relied more on experiential, vicarious, searching and noticing learning processes. The focus of their learning also shifted from product knowledge to knowledge about foreign markets and the internationalization process. In the later stages of their internationalization, experiential learning increased in importance, as did other resource-intensive learning processes such as grafting by acquiring a company overseas. We conclude that the learning processes used by INVs co-evolve with their internationalization, and are more rapid and less systematic than is implied by traditional models of the internationalization process, with substitutes for experiential learning dominating early in the process.

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  • Encouraging students to think strategically when learning to solve linear equations

    Robson, D. E.; Abell, W.; Boustead, T. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Students who are preparing to study science and engineering need to understand equation solving but adult students returning to study can find this difficult. In this paper, the design of an online resource, Equations2go, for helping students learn to solve linear equations is investigated. Students learning to solve equations need to consider their overall strategy as well as the procedures for each step. Students were encouraged to develop strategies for solving equations with interactive software, Equations2go, which allowed students to decide on strategies while the computer carried out the procedures. The results of trials showed that the software helped students solve equations which they could not solve on their own. Some of the students were then able to successfully transfer their learning to solving linear equations with pen and paper.

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  • What influences practice nurses to participate in post-registration education?

    Richardson, A.; Gage, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Introduction: There is a need for educated primary health nurses to develop their practice, educational and career pathways in response to opportunities emerging from the Primary Health Care Strategy (PHCS). This study aimed to explore the opportunities and constraints encountered by practice nurses when participating in post-registration education. Methods: This study used exploratory qualitative design, incorporating focus group interviews with 16 practice nurses employed by Pegasus Health, Christchurch. Qualitative thematic analysis used a general inductive approach. Findings: Seven key themes emerged, including motivation to learn, enablers for learning and challenges to accessing education. Practice nurses also described their changing roles with clients and their vision for practice nursing in the future. Conclusion: This study considered accessibility of post-registration education for practice nurses and the extent to which they are embracing these opportunities in order to meet their practice needs. The PHCS states that primary health care nursing is crucial to its implementation. Successful expansion of primary health care nursing roles rests on the development of educational qualifications and skills, as well as career frameworks. It is envisaged that, with strong leadership and research skills resulting from professional development, practice nurses will be more able to reduce health inequalities. Study findings indicate that practice nurses are rising to the challenge of expanding their roles and engaging in post-registration education. They are more likely to pursue this if constraints are minimised and support increased. Currently practice nurses make significant contributions to primary health care and have the potential for an even greater contribution in the future.

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  • A Māori approach to management: Contrasting traditional and modern Māori management practices in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Mika, J.P.; O'Sullivan, J.G. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This is a conceptual article located in the discourses of indigeneity, post-colonialism and critical management studies in which we seek to renew interest in Māori management as a distinctive form of management within Aotearoa New Zealand. We discuss defining Māori management and Māori organisations and their relevance for today's organsiations in New Zealand and internationally. We examine differences and similarities between Western and Māori management in terms of the four functions of management adapted from principles first proposed by Fayol in 1949. We propose a theoretical model of Māori management and discuss the implications of Māori management for management research, policy and practice.

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  • Exploring the application of agile principles to tertiary computing education

    Proctor, M.; Atkins, C.; Mann, S.; Smith, L.; Smith, H.; Trounson, R.; Sutton, K.; Benson, N.; Dyke, S.; McCarthy, C.; Otto, M.; Nicoll, C. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper defines a proposed set of Agile Principles for Tertiary Computing Education as developed through an Agile Education workshop held during the annual Computing South Island Educators’ (CSIE) forum. The purpose of the workshop was to explore innovative and ‘Agile’ approaches that have been used within our South Island institutions to consider whether the principles of Agile development could be usefully applied or adapted to tertiary computing education. Each case study was analysed to determine alignment with Agile principles and emerging themes in the application of these principles to tertiary computing education were identified and discussed. This led to the development of a proposed set of Agile principles for tertiary computing education to support the development of computing courses, course components and programmes. Meaningful learning has emerged as a key factor for further exploration

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  • www.useless.com: Crisis communications on shaky ground

    Vavasour, K (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    After the magnitude 6.3 earthquake that struck the city of Christchurch on February 22, 2011, the physical and communications infrastructure that many city dwellers rely on suddenly ceased to function. For many, this disruption to physical and virtual networks resulted in access to media, information, assistance and family being cut off or restricted in a number of different ways. Survey results show residents of the less-damaged suburbs made more use of television, websites and social media than those in badly damaged areas, who relied more on radio, word-­of-mouth, and print material. Social media and new technologies are now an established part of the crisis communications discourse; however, the infrastructure they rely on is not as solid and reliable as it may appear. After exploring the concept of blackboxing, the failures and weaknesses of previously backgrounded objects exposed by the earthquakes provide examples of its undoing (un-blackboxing). Quantitative and qualitative survey data is used to show how variations in location and disruption impacted on the information-­seeking of residents, and how the un-­blackboxing of infrastructure and socio-­technical networks left residents out of the loop. This research also challenges perceptions of how widely used, accessible and/or useful technologies like Twitter are to those in the middle of a disaster.

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