4 results for Lincoln University, Becken, Susanne, Conference item

  • Climate variability and climate change: implications for tourism

    Becken, Susanne; Hendrikx, J.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    Tourism often depends on the weather for participation, satisfaction, safety, and business viability. Tourism also depends on natural resources and environmental attractions. Climate models predict increasing temperatures, changing intensity and distribution of rainfall, decreased snow cover, and sea level rise. The tourism industry needs to plan proactively and adapt to variability and change.

    View record details
  • Preparing the tourism sector for climate change

    Becken, Susanne

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    Climate models predict increasing temperatures, changingfrequency, intensity and distribution of rainfall events,decreased snow cover and sea level rise.Such changes will impact on key tourism drivers such asdestination attractiveness, product content, businessprofitability, infrastructure planning and investment.This research will identify adaptation strategies capable ofincreasing ability to cope with changed futures and capitaliseon opportunities.

    View record details
  • Tourism and climate change - an overview

    Becken, Susanne

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    Tourism is dependent on the climate, and climate change will impact on tourism in various ways. Tourism is increasingly carbon intensive, and consumers are becoming increasingly aware of their carbon footprint. This presentation is an overview of tourism and climate change, and examines topics including issues, behaviours, and responses.

    View record details
  • Oil, the global economy and tourism

    Becken, Susanne

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    The availability and price of oil are intimately linked to the global economyand as a result to tourism. This paper presents the results from research ontourism and oil, undertaken with a particular focus on New Zealand as a long hauldestination in the light of dwindling global oil resources.The findings of four distinct research phases will be reported in anintegrative analysis.The results highlight that economic prosperity in countries of origin, andin particular tourists’ income, is of critical importance for outbound tourism, especiallyto long haul destinations. The econometric analysis of in-country behaviour,such as consumption and regional dispersion, reveal that variables such as countryof origin, travel purpose or length of stay are currently more important determinantsof travel behaviour than fuel prices. Coupled with differentiated oil vulnerabilities by different countriesand different levels of price elasticity, the importance of market mix becomes evident.Tourism businesses can reduce their oil vulnerability by addressing a range ofrisk factors. Government policy and industry initiatives can support these microeconomic adaptation processes.Little research is available on the importance of oil shocks for tourismand this paper is an attempt to address this gap. The findings are specific to NewZealand but will be of interest to other long-haul destinations. The analysis integratesacross a range of research methods.

    View record details