79 results for Lincoln University, Conference item

  • Optimal ‘métissage’ for economic advancement: evidence from the US and Canada

    Ratna, Nazmun N.; MacDonald, Ian A.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    We examine the influences of diversity on level and growth rate of GDP at the state and province level in the United States and Canada. Although cross-country studies typically claim that diversity reduces productivity, recent studies with US datasets argue that cultural, linguistic and/or racial diversity contributes positively to aggregate economic performance. The notion is that regions that promote diversity stimulate innovation by building complementarities in knowledge, skills and experiences. Employing a cross-sectional dataset for 48 contiguous states in the US and 10 provinces in Canada, our work measures the impact of ‘social divergence’ - defined as economic effects of barriers to communication created through differences in language, culture, race, ethnicity or religion - on per capita output. We include three measures of diversity, using fractionalisation indices for linguistic, religious, and cultural differences across the states/provinces; and a set of control variables: educational attainment, urbanization, population density, percentage of working age population, and an index of economic freedom. To test the social divergence hypotheses, an interaction term, with a proxy for low level of English fluency, is also included in the OLS estimation. Based on an exhaustive set of robustness tests, we obtain two robust and statistically significant results: one, the estimated coefficients on diversity, variously measured, have a positive impact on per capita output across states and provinces; two, the coefficient of interaction variable is negative, implying that barriers to communication mitigate the positive effects of diversity. The robustness of the OLS results is reinforced when Instrumental Variable Estimation is employed for the potential endogenous variables. Our findings contribute to current policy debates around ‘state-sponsored’ multiculturalism in Canada and provide fresh insights on the use of social capital as a public policy tool in all settler societies. We intend to carry out further research at the city/county level.

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  • Groundwater models

    Bidwell, Vincent

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    This presentation introduces model concepts and terms, demonstrates some models, develops critical awareness of modelling issues, and enables use of published and accepted groundwater models. The regional scale, steady-flow, groundwater model demonstrates the principal behaviour of nitrate contamination from land use, while the stream function approach to contaminant transport addresses questions about response times of effects of land use change. The use of a steady-flow groundwater model for regional scale reduces computation time, which may be important for real-time stakeholder participation.

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  • Understanding copyright: Applying copyright requirements to your teaching resources

    Tritt, Sarah; Dawson, Roger; Ainsworth, Lyndsay; Henderson, Caroline

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    Understanding copyright in a New Zealand tertiary education setting requires familiarity with the basics of the Copyright Act 1994 and the internationally recognised Creative Commons licencing system. The law of copyright attempts to balance the rights and obligations of users and creators. The open access environment has encouraged engagement with an increasing amount of resources, and there are tools to more easily discover content that has clearly defined and appropriate terms of reuse applied.

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  • R(r)estoring te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere (aka 'the lucky lake'): moving from the glass 1/2 full, to the glass 3/4 full

    Hughey, Kenneth F. D.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    The restoration of Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere is essentail for the ongoing survival of the ecology of the lake. There is an $11.6 million clean up plan prepared for New Zealand's most polluted lake, so where to from here? The future of the lake has challenges but these are being addressed by the Waihora Ellesmere Trust, tangata whenua, and the community.

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  • Success and cost effectiveness of multi-species projects

    Cullen, Ross; Hughey, Kenneth F. D.; Moran, Emma M.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    Species loss is widely recognised as one of the most seriousenvironmental problems nations face. Of 142 nations compared against a wide variety of indicatorsNew Zealand is considered to be performing worst in terms ofbiodiversity (World Economic Forum 2002). New Zealand is reported to have 1300 threatened andendangered species of which about 34 species have 'recovery plans', someoperating since at least 1987. Biodiversity strategy projects estimate approx NZ $1 billion in additional expenditure on biodiversity programsover the next 20 years. There are some obvious challenges and a need to develop methodologies to aid investment decision-making and evaluate the programs and projects.

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  • Uptake and persistence of 1080 in watercress and puha

    Ogilvie Shaun, C.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    Sodium fluoroacetate (Compound 1080) is a key tool in the control of possums, and the most extensively used vertebrate pesticide in New Zealand. The most common method of control using this pesticide is via aerial application of cereal or carrot baits containing 1080. Despite the efficiency of aerial 1080 application for reducing possum population numbers, support amongst Māori is mixed. The risk of secondary poisoning of people using kai resources has previously been identified as key research by the Animal Health Board (AHB), Environmental Risk Management Authority (ERMA) and Māori. During aerial application of 1080 baits, there is the possibility that 1080 may leach from baits and be taken up by nearby plants. This presentation is part of a research programme conducted to investigate the uptake and persistence of 1080 in watercress and puha.

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  • New Zealand fresh water management and agricultural impacts

    Cullen, Ross; Kerr, Geoffrey N.; Hughey, Kenneth F. D.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    Outline• The legislation, policy and institutionalcontexts under which water is managed;• Evidence to show that institutions arefailing in the tasks defined by thislegislation:- biophysical sciences and policy- national perceptions survey;• Some reasons for these failures• Some ways to address the situation

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  • Ranking NZ river values: application of the River Values Assessment System (RiVAS)

    Baker, M.-A.; Hughey, Kenneth F. D.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    Many attempts over several decades have been made to develop priority lists of important rivers for different values (e.g., angling, kayaking, irrigation, native birds) in New Zealand. Apart from one or two of these most have lacked clear methods, have been data poor, have been ad hoc, and perhaps worst of all, have not been standardised to provide a method that could be applied to all values. The River Values Assessment System (RiVAS) is a multi criteria analysis based tool that enables any set of rivers to be prioritised for any specified value.

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  • The birdlife of Te Waihora Lake Ellesmere: verification of the PLOVER lake management model

    Hughey, Kenneth F. D.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    In this oral presentation the number of bird species recorded at Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere are compared with the total number of bird species in New Zealand. Using the PLOVER model the findings record that there are very high species diversity, comparatively large proportions of the numbers of some species using New Zealand wetlands as over-wintering sites during their migrations, comparatively large numbers of some species which rely on the lake for particular life stages, and very large numbers of some species groups. A very diverse habitat underpins these values.

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  • Native birds and their habitat needs on Canterbury rivers

    Hughey, Kenneth F. D.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    Canterbury’s rivers, especially the wide braided rivers, are special habitats for birdlife, occupied by a range of bird guilds.Several threatened and endangered species are enormously reliant on these rivers.The habitat needs of birdlife are highly dependent on controls maintained by river flows. There is a lack of research and at least 2 key critical habitat relationships: predation-flow and energetics. Some mitigation measures are possible but key ones are very expensive, e.g., vegetation management and predator control.

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  • Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere management and modelling – setting the scene

    Hughey, Kenneth F. D.; Taylor, Kenneth P.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    In this oral presentation the state of Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere is considered, along with three possible future scenarios. Resilience, adaptive cycles and tolerance ranges are introduced and the principles and practices of modelling are highlighted. The PLOVER model is used to evaluate the environmental systems of the lake.

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  • Monitoring long term trends in the use by birds of Te Waihora-Lake Ellesmere: the importance of the 2013 initiative

    Hughey, Kenneth F. D.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    The aim of this research is to develop and implement an integrated monitoring programme for the diverse range ofbirdlife and associated values of Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere that provides timely, costeffective and relevant information for lake and birdlife managers, and otherstakeholders.

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  • Section 42A officer’s report : potential effects of HWP's proposed activities on native bird habitat in the Hurunui river

    Hughey, Kenneth F. D.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    Birdlife of the Hurunui River is considered nationallyimportant, yet recent research presented at theHurunui Waiau Regional Plan hearing suggestshabitat conditions are at best marginal. Given these marginal conditions it seems highlylikely the proposals from HWP will have a significantdetrimental effect on native riverbed nesting birdlife.

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  • Caucasian clover responses to fertiliser, lime and rhizobia inoculation at Lake Heron Station, Canterbury

    Black, Alistair; Harvey, A. J.; Moir, L. J.; Moot, Derrick J.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    The agronomic performance of Caucasian clover in high country grasslands was the subject of two experiments at Lake Heron Station, Canterbury.

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  • Citizen science - understanding, participating, legitimating

    Hughey, Kenneth F. D.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

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  • Water quantity and quality issues in Canterbury water

    Hughey, Kenneth F. D.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    Oral presentation slides based on a talk given to the NZIA&HS, Lincoln University, 2014: (Having your cake and eating it too: balancing different land uses and their impacts (Or: Having your river & swimming in it too)). Paper to the ‘Canterbury Water –Are we doing enough?’ public forum; Southern Environment Trust, Hagley Oval Function Lounge, 18th March 2015.

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  • Management practices of dairy cows grazing kale

    Edwards, Grant

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    Regaining body condition lost throughlactation is a common goal for manyNZ dairy systems. Kale is a major component of the winter diet for dairy cows, with high DM yield carried through winter with less deterioration in nutritive value compared toother feeds. But body condition gain on kale oftendoes not meet farmers expectations. This presentation looks at the use of kale as a winter feed crop compared with other crops such as fodder beet.

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  • Observations on magnolias at Lincoln University

    Edwards, Roy A.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    In the winter of 1990 the nucleus of a Magnolia collection was planted at Lincoln University. This was in a block within the Horticultural Research Area that was no longer required as a stool bed for producing apple rootstocks. Additional plants were purchased in 1991 and 1992. These replaced a smaller existing number of established magnolias, removed to make way for the then new Commerce Building. After 1992 further development was slow until a grant was given by the Brian Mason Scientific & Technical Trust to increase the collection. In June 1998 the Brian Mason Scientific & Technical Trust awarded a grant of $5000 for additional plant material and labelling. With that grant the collection has been broadened from magnolias to include other genera and species within the Magnoliaceae family. The collection now includes approximately one hundred and twenty plants from four genera; Magnolia, Manglietia, Michelia and Liriodendron.Three other lesser known genera; Elmerrillia, Kmeria and Pachylarnax also belong to the Magnoliaceae family, but are not represented in the collection. The closest New Zealand examples includes Pseudowintera species which at one stage were regarded as being in the Magnoliaceae, but are now classified in a closely related family the Winteraceae. Currently there are still a number of species that will be added to the collection when we able to source the seed or plants. Most of the species within the Lincoln University collection are native to temperate eastern Asia and North America.

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  • Māori and the Otautahi/Christchurch earthquakes

    Lambert, Simon J.; Shadbolt, Melanie

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    This presentation outlines the impacts on the Maori community of the Christchurch earthquakes including responses, resilience and population movements.

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