233 results for Lincoln University, Report

  • Wairarapa Water Use Project: Preliminary Social Impact Assessment

    Taylor, N.; McClintock, W.; Mackay, Michael D.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The Wairarapa Water Use Project is an initiative of the Greater Wellington Regional Council to establish a multi-purpose water scheme or schemes based on harvesting, storage and distribution of water in the Ruamahanga Valley. At this early feasibility stage the project is considering five possible water storage options from an initial list of 14. Likely outcomes of the project include an increase in the area of irrigable land, greater security in the supply of irrigation water and subsequent intensification of land uses. The project has the potential to increase irrigation in the Wairarapa by 10-30,000 hectares from 12,000 hectares at present. This social impact assessment is a preliminary assessment as part of the pre-feasibility phase of the Project. It is at a broad level and not specific to a particular scheme or schemes. The analysis considers the current social context (without scheme) and the likely effects of the proposed additional irrigation at a broad level in a desk-based study. The assessment area comprised the three combined districts of South Wairarapa, Carterton and Masterton -the Combined Districts. Separate recreation and economic assessments were conducted.

    View record details
  • Representation and legitimacy in collaborative freshwater planning: stakeholder perspectives on a Canterbury Zone Committee

    Sinner, J.; Newton, M. J.; Duncan, R.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The long-term success of collaborative approaches to freshwater planning depends on their democratic legitimacy. With collaborative planning being promoted by the New Zealand government and trialled by several regional councils, this study is one of the first in New Zealand to gauge the wider community’s views of the legitimacy of this new approach. This report focuses on the issue of representation—how affected interests are involved in collaborative deliberations—and specifically the perceptions of the legitimacy of the collaborative process by those not directly involved in the deliberations themselves. These people were categorised broadly as people who attended workshops to provide input to the process, those who made formal submissions at a later stage in the process, and the general public. We asked the question, how does an individual’s or group’s level of involvement with a collaborative planning process affect their perceptions of the legitimacy of the process?

    View record details
  • Jet boating on Canterbury Rivers - 2015

    Greenaway, R.; Gerard, R.; Hughey, K. F. D.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    All jetboating rivers in Canterbury are described in terms of their values, flow needs and other considerations. Access, flow restrictions, and seasonal limits are identified and the top boating opportunities are highlighted. The rivers are dealt with geographically and reported on by section according to the findings of the River Values Assessment System which was the base research undertaken.

    View record details
  • Hivemind Beehive Monitoring System field trial and management practice change study report

    Yuan, X.; Charters, Stuart; Walsh, C.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The current Hivemind Beehive Monitoring System aims to provide timely information to beekeepers on the current status (weight and temperature) of their hives through a central hub and wireless scales backed by an online portal. This study through survey and field trial gathered data on beekeepers views of the installation and operation of the system and gathered data on hive performances in the field.

    View record details
  • Predator free Banks Peninsula: scoping analysis

    Curnow, M.; Kerr, Geoffrey N.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    There has been considerable public interest in predator control following the release of the government’s goal to make New Zealand predator free by 2050. Prompted and supported by the Rod Donald Banks Peninsula Trust, this report undertakes an initial scoping analysis of the methods, cost and time required to remove five predator species from Banks Peninsula and maintain them at zero density. Because eradication requires permanent removal of the five target species (Norway rats, ship rats, possums, stoats, ferrets) but there are ongoing opportunities for reinvasion it would be necessary to indefinitely monitor and manage these predators after initial removal. Predator removal, using ground control, would rely on a mix of methods and would cost from $88 m. to $134 m. Ongoing costs would be in the order of $1.65 m. per annum, excluding buffer, quarantine and biosecurity measures. Even with a work force of 100 full time employees, eradication would take several years.

    View record details
  • An analysis of credit scoring for agricultural loans in Thailand

    Limsombunchai, Visit; Gan, Christopher; Lee, M.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The following is a summary of An Analysis of Credit Scoring for Agricultural Loans in Thailand written by Visit Limsombunchai, Christopher Gan and Minsoo Lee, published by Science Publications in 2005. The purpose of the summarized study is to determine the optimal credit-scoring model for agricultural loans in Thailand. Three credit scoring models are tested to predict a borrower’s creditworthiness and default risk.

    View record details
  • Mapping restoration plantings in Selwyn: the stepping stones of a wildlife corridor

    Greer, P.; Bowie, Michael H.; Doscher, Crile

    Report
    Lincoln University

    Canterbury plains currently has less than 1% of the original native vegetation due to human settlement and farming. Selwyn as one of Canterbury’s districts has experienced an increase in intensified farming in the last 20 years. The changes in farming practices has increased the loss of vegetation, with changes in water use and quality. Through the use of native vegetation as shelter belts, riparian and corner plantings they have become part of the stepping stones concept. Farm plantings are part of the answer, other plantings such as road margins, river banks, public parks and private (non-farming) gardens also provide biodiversity support. The range of plantings provide recreational and learning areas for schools and the public. These areas include parks, schools through supplementing remaining native areas, and along waterways enhancing streams and rivers in riparian plantings. The concept of using stepping stones for increased biodiversity interaction is increasing in restoration circles. Stepping stones are areas of native plantings to increase native biodiversity. Through the use of these stepping stones insects, lizards, and birds are able to increase their ranges to find habitat, food, pollination and increase their future populations’ genetic diversity. The Selwyn Waihora Active Restoration Forum (SWARF) mapped known restoration sites in 2013 for use as stepping stones. This map has not had sites added to it since 2013. Due to the lack of follow up members of SWARF decided that the way the map was created, information on it, the level of accessibility to the general public, new viewpoints and interaction with the map needed to be considered for ongoing use. This follow up was turned into a Summer Scholarship project at Lincoln University. This report will discuss the background of the Stepping Stone concept and how it applies to the Selwyn district and Canterbury, what information is currently available on the SWARF map, how different groups would like to use the map, suggest alternative places the map could be hosted, what information could be available for the public, compare whether similar mapping or information is available through other regional councils and create a map for future use.

    View record details
  • Yarr’s Flat Wildlife Reserve & Yarr’s Lagoon: an assessment of fauna present to guide future restoration and conservation of native species

    Bowie, Michael H.; Hutson, M.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    Two sites of ecological interest, Yarr’s Lagoon and Yarr’s Flat Wildlife Reserve along the LII or Araiara River in Selwyn District, Canterbury were surveyed for terrestrial fauna of interest. A variety of standard methods including pitfall traps, Malaise traps and light traps (for invertebrates), tracking tunnels (for lizards and mammals), five minute bird counts (for birds) were used to assess the fauna present. A higher diversity of ground beetles were found in willow habitats than native habitats at both Yarr’s Flat and Yarr’s Lagoon. Native moth larva, weevils and mites were found on glasswort at Yarr’s Flat. Eleven and seven native birds were found at Yarr’s Lagoon and Yarr’s Flat respectively. Of interest was a probable sighting of sandpiper curlew at Yarr’s Flat and secretive marsh crake at Yarr’s Lagoon. Lizards found included the common skink at Yarr’s Flat and an unknown skink at Yarr’s Lagoon. Tracking tunnels found prints from possum, mice, hedgehog, rats and mustelid at Yarrs Flat and only possum and mice from Yarr’s Lagoon. Ecological restoration of the two areas are discussed and recommendations for the management of the native biodiversity is given.

    View record details
  • Assessing the invertebrate fauna trajectories in remediation sites of Winstone Aggregates Hunua quarry in Auckland

    Curtis, K.; Bowie, Michael H.; Barber, Keith S.; Boyer, Stephane; Marris, John W. M.; Patrick, B.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This study monitored the invertebrates in restoration plantings in the Winstone Aggregates Hunua Quarry. This was to assess the re-establishment of invertebrates in the restoration planting sites and compare them with unplanted control and mature sites. This study follows on from a baseline study carried out in 2014-2015 measuring the restoration trajectory of invertebrates in the Winstone Aggregate Hunua quarry site. A range of entomological monitoring techniques were used and found that dung beetles, millipedes, foliage moths, leaf litter moths and some mite species increased in numbers from the control sites through to the mature sites, while ants, rove beetles, grass moths, some carabid beetles, and worms showed a downwards trend from the mature sites to the control sites. Further monitoring of invertebrates in the restoration area should be carried out.

    View record details
  • Networks of support for Māori mental health: The response and recovery of Tangata Whaiora through the Ōtautahi earthquakes

    Lambert, Simon J.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This report presents the experiences of Tangata Whaiora (Mental health clients) through the disastrous earthquakes that struck Otautahi/Christchurch in 2010-11. It further analysis these experience to how show the social networks these individuals, their whānau, supporting staff respond and recover to a significant urban disaster. The disaster challenged the mental health of those individuals who are impacted and the operations of organisations and networks that support and care for the mentally ill. How individuals and their families navigate a post-disaster landscape provides an unfortunate but unique opportunity to analyse how these support networks respond to severe disruption. Tangata Whaiora possess experiences of micro-scale personal and family disasters and were not necessarily shocked by the loss of normality in Ōtautahi as a result of the earthquakes. The organic provision of clear leadership, outstanding commitment by staff, and ongoing personal and institutional dedication in the very trying circumstances of working in a post-disaster landscape all contributed to Te Awa o te Ora’s notable response to the disaster.

    View record details
  • The Hurunui Waiau Zone Implementation Programme as a collaborative planning process: A preliminary review

    Memon, A.; Duncan, R.; Spicer, A.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The objective of this report is to provide a preliminary assessment of the development of the Hurunui Waiau Zone Implementation Programme as a collaborative planning exercise to progress the implementation of the Canterbury Water Management Strategy (CWMS) in the Hurunui Waiau catchments. This report builds on an earlier study (Lomax, Memon and Painter, 2010) on the development of the CWMS as an innovative collaborative regional strategy to address exacerbating conflicts over the allocation and management of freshwater resources in the Canterbury region in New Zealand. Past attempts to satisfactorily address these concerns within the framework of the Resource Management Act 1991 statutory planning regime have encountered significant barriers. The formulation and implementation of the CWMS is expected to overcome these barriers by having adopted a collaborative governance model. This report reflects upon and presents observations of the Hurunui Waiau Zone Implementation Programme process. As such, it flags for the Canterbury Regional Council a number of issues which have emerged from this valuable learning experience and concludes with a number of questions drawn from our observations for consideration by the CRC with zone committees and other stakeholder groups and recommendations for research.

    View record details
  • Deer carcass breakdown monitoring

    Ross, J. G.; McCoskery, H.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This research project monitored 1080 residue breakdown in muscle, skin, bone and stomach samples for two sika deer (Cervus nippon) carcasses during the period October 2010 to May 2011. These deer were located immediately following a possum control operation undertaken on the 23/10/2010 using aerially-delivered 1080 bait.

    View record details
  • Conservation and biology of the rediscovered nationally endangered Canterbury knobbled weevil, Hadramphus tuberculatus

    Iles, J.; Bowie, M. H.; Johns, P.; Chinn, W.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    Three areas near Burkes Pass Scenic Reserve were surveyed for the presence of Hadramphus tuberculatus, a recently rediscovered endangered weevil. The reserve itself was resurveyed to expand on a 2005/2006 survey. Non-lethal pitfall traps and mark and recapture methods were used. Six H. tuberculatus were caught in pitfall traps over 800 trap nights. Day and night searching of Aciphylla aurea was conducted. Four specimens were observed on Aciphylla flowers between 9 am and 1.30 pm within the reserve. No specimens were found outside of the reserve by either method. Other possible locations where H. tuberculatus may be found were identified and some visited. At most locations Aciphylla had already finished flowering, no H. tuberculatus were found. Presence of H. tuberculatus at other sites would be best determined by searching of Aciphylla flowers during the morning from late October onwards.

    View record details
  • Establishing a baseline: Ecological monitoring for Panama Rock and Stones remnant, Le Bons Bay, Banks Peninsula

    Bowie, M. H.; Smith, M.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The eastern side of Banks Peninsula was created by eruptions and subsequent erosion of the Akaroa volcano which was active between 9 and 8 million years ago. Banks Peninsula was completely forested but due to human settlement approximately one percent of the forested area was left by the early 1900s. This large-scale removal of forest and the introduction of exotic mammals created a mass extinction of New Zealand’s native biota. The present day landscape is a mixture of bush occupying gullies which either escaped clearance or have regenerated due to more ideal moisture conditions and less disturbance from farming stock. The forested areas consist of either kanuka canopy or a mixed canopy of Fuchsia, mahoe, fivefinger, lemonwood, lacebark, ribbonwood, pigeonwood, kowhai and kaikomako. Within the eastern side of Banks Peninsula, inland from Le Bons Bay, is an area called Panama Rock, also known as Keller’s Peak. This peak is a trachyte dome with a feeder dike trending away south westwards. An invertebrate study on 19 covenant and reserves on eastern Banks Peninsula found that the Panama Rock remnant had high diversity compared to the others. The Panama Rock remnant was bought by the Joseph Langer Trust to conserve the native flora and fauna of the area and to make it available for the public to enjoy. This research aims to identify the native and pest fauna of the area. Monitoring will assist with management decisions by identifying: which native species are present, species in need of conservation, and exotic pests that need to be eradicated. Baseline surveys will allow the Trust to compare with future years and be able to gauge if their management actions are working. If the Trust is planning to trap introduced mammals at Panama Rock and/or the Stones remnant, monitoring will help to determine whether trapping is helping the native biodiversity.

    View record details
  • Postgraduate education for sustainability at Lincoln University, New Zealand

    Spicer,, A.; Barthelmeh, Michael R.; Montgomery, Roy L.; Spellerberg, Ian F.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    Sustainability is an inexact and contested term: – Jacobs (1999) places it in the same category as ‘social justice’ and ‘liberty’ i.e. concepts that are elusive but nonetheless vital to political functioning. Despite the drawbacks of the term, sustainability is part of our everyday language. Research in this area, for instance, is increasing (Schoolman et al., 2012) and so are employment opportunities (Atkisson 2011; Sainty, 2007). This provides tertiary institutions with some interesting questions. How can they include sustainability in the curriculum given that there are multiple ways of assessing its meaning and importance, and given that the topic is highly interdisciplinary and that it involves a different world view (i.e. a network, systems approach) from currently dominant views (e.g. an individualistic approach)? This report looks at the options for teaching sustainability at the postgraduate level at Lincoln University, New Zealand. It may be helpful to read this report in conjunction with LEaP Report 25 (Spicer et al. 2011) which considered the options for including Education for Sustainability in the undergraduate curriculum of the same University. However all material relevant to an Education for Sustainability at the postgraduate level that is common to both reports has been reproduced here.

    View record details
  • State of the tourism industry 2016

    Wilson, Judith; Simmons, David G.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This report examines the last ten years of tourism in New Zealand and gives a snapshot of the current state and performance of the tourism industry. It is the sixth publication in an annual series produced by Lincoln University and Tourism Industry Aotearoa (TIA).

    View record details
  • Lincoln Hub data and Information architecture project: DATA²: Data architecture transforming access & analysis

    Carnaby, Penny; Charters, Stuart; Staincliffe, P.; Cahalane, R.; Laurenson, M.; Gibb, R.; McGlinchy, A.; Sutherland, S.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The vision for the DATA² project is to enable the intellectual capital produced by researchers and scientists in the Lincoln Hub to be better managed, curated and shared for reuse. This will facilitate the production of new knowledge and innovation of direct benefit to New Zealand’s economic, environmental, social and cultural aspirations over time.

    View record details
  • Interest groups, vested interests, and the myth of apolitical administration : the politics of land tenure reform on the South Island of New Zealand

    Brower, Ann L.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This report explores the political history, property rights, and administrative politics of the land tenure reform process to ask why the Crown has paid farmers millions of dollars to convert land from leasehold to freehold. Since 1992, runholders have received collectively 58% (or 165,446 hectares) of the reformed pastoral estate as fee-simple, and $15.5 million. The report documents the results of research in the South Island of New Zealand during Fulbright grant year 2004-05. Land tenure reform is a process of dividing up the Crown pastoral estate into freehold and public conservation land. The pastoral estate constitutes about one-tenth of NZ's landmass. The Crown holds all 2.4 million hectares of the pastoral estate; and it has alienated, or leased out, certain use rights to the lessees. Now the Crown is in the process of purchasing pastoral and occupation use rights and land improvements back from the lessee, on the hectares shifting into DOC custody. And the lessees are in the process of purchasing a whole bundle of Crown-held use rights on the hectares passing to freehold. This Crown-held bundle of use rights includes subdivision, condominium construction, ski field development, viticulture, safari park development, and automobile tyre testing centre development. The Crown-held bundle even includes such mundane use rights as planting grass seeds without prior consent of the Commissioner of Crown Lands. Chapter 2 deconstructs the numerical results - hectares and dollars - of the land reform policy endeavour so far, and reveals that these numbers are contested. Quite simply, it depends on what you count and how you count them. And those methodological counting decisions, while appearing dry and clinical, most certainly are not. Numbers are the stuff of public policy, and decisions on how to count them are the stuff of politics. Further, the number of hectares is misleading, as it is use rights being exchanged here, not the hectares themselves. Chapter 3, "Interest Groups, Property Rights, and States' Rights: The Sagebrush Rebellion and New Zealand Land Tenure Reform", examines the political history of South Island public grazing land, from first establishment of pastoral licenses in 1856 to the 1998 passage of legislation governing the disestablishment of the pastoral lease system. It takes a comparative perspective, using the Sagebrush Rebellion launched by ranchers in the American West as a lens. It concludes that NZ farmers' push for freehold succeeded while the American ranchers' campaign failed, for three reasons: 1) property rights arrangements in NZ pastoral leases allow lessees to exclude recreationists and other trespassers, while not in the US; 2) the lack of legally-sanctioned reliable recreation access and conservation provisions in the leases led NZ's most prominent conservation and recreation advocacy groups to join the farmers' campaign for land tenure reform, while similar US groups opposed the Sagebrush Rebellion; 3) NZ farmers were able to use administrative and institutional momentum from the state sector reforms of the 1980s in their campaign for reform. Next chapter 4, "Trading Sticks with the Crown: Redistributing Property Rights to Effect Land Use Change" explores the current distribution and redistribution of property rights in the Crown pastoral estate, in order to examine the merits of using property rights as a tool to create land use change. It deconstructs property rights arrangements in pastoral leases into their constituent parts and finds that there is some uncertainty surrounding the relationship between the lessee-held exclusive occupation right and the Crown-held non-pastoral use rights. It concludes that this uncertainty is a matter to be addressed by the Courts, not by government contractors or even government officials. Finally, it offers alternative policy tools to achieve the desired changes in land use with an eye to reducing the cost to the government. The last chapter, "Who is sticking up for the Crown? The myth of apolitical administration in New Zealand land tenure reform" evaluates the results of land reform on the national scale by looking at the administrative politics within the process managed by Land Information New Zealand (LINZ). It observes that the numerical results of tenure review are strongly biased in favour of the farmer, with the farmers receiving 58% of the land as freehold, fee simple private property, and receiving millions of dollars in "equalization payments". It concludes that LINZ's subscription to the myth of apolitical administration is leading the agency that represents the Crown's vested interest in the land to take a position of neutrality in negotiations instead of one of advocacy. LINZ relies on a functional split between policy and operations, which in turn relies on the oldest trick in the book of public administration - the politics-administration dichotomy. These two models share a common goal - avoiding agency capture in policy implementation - and administrative tool - neutrality. But in this case, striving for neutrality is neutralizing the Crown's vested interest in the land. LINZ cannot be neutral and advocate for the Crown's interest at the same time. Thus over-reliance on the myth of apolitical administration is leading to a result that out-captures agency capture theories of interest group politics. This report does not paint a rosy picture of land tenure reform. It concludes that the myth of apolitical administration supercedes interest group politics and property rights, and leads the Crown to take a neutral stance in the face of powerful special interests motivated to diversify land use, be it for venison farming, viticulture, or lifestyle blocks. It is impossible to remove politics from inherently political decisions such as redistributing valuable resources. And it can be a dangerous endeavour. In this case, striving for neutrality in order to achieve a fair, unbiased, and uncaptured result is doomed to fail on all counts, no matter how well-intentioned the attempt. The Crown is asserting neither its property rights nor its bargaining powers. Instead, the Crown's position of neutrality leads it to give away valuable property rights and pay constituents to take it. In short, the myth of apolitical administration makes the Crown complicit giving away freehold title to New Zealand's iconic high country, and paying the lease-holders to take it. To sum up, the politics of land tenure reform remain win-win as long as the Crown agrees to lose. This is not an indictment of LINZ. I have no data to support a claim that the agency's attempts at neutrality are anything but honest, competent, and well-intentioned. But placing "neutral" and "vested interest" in the same task description will not work. One will lose. In this case, it is the vested interest, the Crown, and ultimately the NZ people.

    View record details
  • Supporting Lean Manufacturing Initiatives in New Zealand

    Wilson, M.; Heyl, J.; Smallman, C.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    View record details
  • Wildlife

    Hughey, K.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    View record details