54 results for Massey University, Report

  • A case study exploring the interconnections between literacy, employment and the library in Wanganui Prison's self-care units: The Wanganui adult literacy and employment project

    Vaccarino, F; Murray, N; Comrie, M; Franklin, J; Sligo, F

    Report
    Massey University

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  • In their own words: Policy implications from the Wanganui adult literacy and employment research programme

    Sligo, F; Culligan, N; Comrie, M; Tilley, E; Vaccarino, F; Franklin, J

    Report
    Massey University

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  • Voices: First-hand experiences of adult literacy learning and employment in Wanganui

    Tilley, E; Sligo, F; Shearer, F; Comrie, M; Murray, N; Franklin, J; Vaccarino, F; Watson, B

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    Massey University

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  • Perspectives of adult literacy learners 2004-2006: A report from the adult literacy and employment programme

    Tilley, E; Comrie, M; Watson, B; Murray, N; Sligo, F; Franklin, J; Vaccarino, F

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    Massey University

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  • Transition to a low-carbon economy for New Zealand

    Sims, REH; Barton, B; Bennet, P; Isaacs, N; Kerr, S; Leaver, J; Reisinger, A; Stephenson, J

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    Massey University

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  • A survey to better understand the performance measurement dimensions for Australasian nonprofit healthcare organisations: data summary report

    Soysa, IB; Jayamaha, NP; Grigg, NP

    Report
    Massey University

    This report has been especially prepared for those who responded to our survey, which was designed to test the performance measurement system that we developed for Australasian healthcare nonprofit organisations (NPOs). The performance measurement (PM) system itself was developed through extensive case studies involving nine Australasian NPOs (six from New Zealand and three from Australia). Figure 1 shows our PM Framework. The report provides key findings from a survey recently conducted by us to test the PM framework that we developed through case studies (some details of the case studies have been described). Our performance framework was found to be reliably generalisable across Australasian NPOs in the healthcare sector. The framework is therefore useful for performance monitoring and improvement of healthcare NPOs in the region. An online questionnaire was used to collect the data from senior managers belonging to healthcare NPOs across Australia and New Zealand. Out of the 1550 senior managers invited to participate in the survey, 232 responded, resulting in a response rate of 15%, which is considered satisfactory for this type of a survey. We found that the most survey participants were familiar with PM systems. The study validated the nine PM domains (categories) in our framework, namely Mission; Strategy; Organisational Infrastructure; People; Financial Health; Process; Client Satisfaction; People Satisfaction and Donor Satisfaction. The survey showed that out of the 41 survey questions (items) allotted to the nine PM domains, five are incompatible with the PM framework (they do not relate to any of the nine PM dimensions of our model); these have been removed from the final analysis. We found that out of the 36 valid survey items considered, organisations performed exceptionally well in 6 items (Q3, Q5, Q20, Q1, Q17 and Q27), reasonably well in 27 items, and moderately well in 3 items (Q34, Q7, and Q41); see Table 2 for definitions as well as results. The study confirmed that the organisation has to be driven by their directors and the senior leadership in order to achieve better performance. This includes understanding and developing the people within the organisation. We found that the processes put in place by the organisations to achieve stakeholder satisfaction can be divided into three types: continuous improvement; designing of safe, efficient and effective processes; and designing of the infrastructure, technology and material to create the necessary support processes. We also found that the three key stakeholders of NPOs — clients (or customers), employees, and donors — carry approximately equal weight in achieving the mission. Each of these stakeholder groups has their own set of expectations and these expectations belong to three themes: delivering high quality services and support to the community; valuing skilled workers and recognising people (volunteers included); and commitment to social responsibility. The complementary Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that we have provided helps organisations to conduct self-assessments on organisational performance. This in turn helps an organisation to identify: (a) best practices for process improvements, (b) trends in performance management practices, benchmark practices and (c) relationships between performance and stakeholders and organisational performance.

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  • Papua New Guinea national human development report

    Banks, GA

    Report
    Massey University

    Papua New Guinea (PNG) stands at a critical moment in its development. With Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth of over 20 per cent expected for 2015, following the start of production from the massive PNG Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) project, the country has a unique opportunity to leverage significant sustainable and equitable improvements in levels of health, education, income and other elements of inclusive human development. At the same time, the country also faces considerable risks. If poor choices are made, the impact of the high growth rates will be limited, even detrimental to the development prospects of Papua New Guineans and the nation and the lives of people living in poverty. This report aims to provide information and national as well as international case study experiences to assist decision-making in the country. The report has four purposes: (1) Review the extent to which Papua New Guinea’s revenues from extractive industries have led to practical human development outcomes; (2) Reveal lessons from other countries that can be useful for Papua New Guinea; (3) Highlight some specific innovations from Papua New Guinea’s experience that can contribute to development in other countries; and (4) Stimulate, inform and shift the debate in the country to enable leaders to make appropriate choices for the wellbeing of citizens. Papua New Guinea’s 40 year history of Independence has been dominated by the extractives sector. Large-scale mine and oil production (worth at least K150billion since Independence) has driven formal sector growth, underpinned budgets that have improved health and education outcomes, as well as provided significant improvements in incomes and livelihoods for some. At the same time however, this production has sparked civil strife, caused massive environmental damage, arguably distorted the economy, and brought about a range of negative impacts on communities. Valuable lessons are being learnt (and have potential international relevance), but still the risk remains that the existing model of economic growth in the country will not deliver sustained improvements in wellbeing for the majority of the population. The report reviews the state of human development in Papua New Guinea in terms of the three pillars of sustainable development – economic, social and environmental – and specifically examines the ways in which the extractive industries have contributed – positively and negatively – to these related but distinct pillars. While there have been some measurable achievements in terms of improvements in human development (increases in life expectancy, per capita income and educational achievement), many of the indicators are less positive. Despite 14 consecutive years of economic growth, there has been little change in poverty levels in the country. In fact the level of inequality in the country has increased. There is much that is positive about the contribution of the extractives sector to Papua New Guinea’s development, including significant revenue flows to government, cutting edge innovations to enhance revenue and transparency at the national level, as well as the involvement of some communities in some operational decision-making. There remains however, considerable scope for improvement. Other positive impacts include recent initiatives addressing service delivery, governance, and policy direction that provide useful guides to future action. The report reviews the significant amount of national and international experience and recent policy development throughout the extractives sector, much of which has been driven by the realization that mineral and oil wealth has not always been a positive force for a country’s national development. The term ‘resource curse’ captures the international view that growth based on a dominant extractives sector can, if not managed well, lead to a range of negative effects, including stunted economic growth, corruption, weak institutions, conflict, human rights abuses, and poor human development outcomes. There is also, however, experience that suggests the ‘resource curse’ is not inevitable: that there are particular political, institutional and economic mechanisms that can be used to better connect resource wealth with sustainable human development. Papua New Guinea is on the frontline of innovation in some of these areas, and valuable lessons can inform international best practice and decision-making. Based on a review of the state of human development and the experience of the extractives sector in Papua New Guinea, along with case studies and lessons from the national and international experience, the report presents a range of policy options – framed around a United Nations Development Program’s Strategy on Extractive Industries and Human Development. This aims to assist in better translating minerals and oil revenues into more sustainable and inclusive forms of human development. For this to happen, countries should seek to capture as much of the resource revenue as possible through transparent and accountable systems - without losing the foreign investment - and use this to boost human development through effective service delivery to the largely rural-based population, while working to reduce the negative social, economic and environmental impacts. Policy options to do this include ways of making policy frameworks and operation-specific negotiations more effective and more inclusive, refinements in institutional governance and service delivery, improvements to transparency and management of revenue flows (though mechanisms such as the Sovereign Wealth Fund and the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative), the establishment of a formal sector-specific grievance mechanism, a focus on building economic diversification into non-extractive sectors (especially agriculture and tourism), novel environmental management approaches, better integration of corporate community development contributions, and improvements in data collection and management processes. Taken singularly, or preferably as a whole, these options provide the basis for enhancing the contribution of the sector to sustainable human development. They are offered as a basis for public and policy dialogue and debate, which should then form the basis for action. The report recognises that it is only the timely actions of stakeholders in the country – governments, leaders, politicians, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), development partners, citizens and the private sector – that will make a practical and real difference to human development outcomes in Papua New Guinea. Papua New Guinea has a unique window of opportunity to make some of these decisions now. The country needs to grasp this opportunity.

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  • Self-assessment in tertiary education. Final research report to Ako Aotearoa

    Bourke, R; Tait, C

    Report
    Massey University

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  • Freshwater fish predictive modelling for bio-assessment; a scoping study into fish bio-assessment models as national indicators

    Joy, MK

    Report
    Massey University

    The match between the biota expected at a site in the absence of impacts and what is found there when testing is a robust and popular bioassessment method in many countries worldwide. The difference between the assemblage found and that expected is measured as the observed/expected ratio and is the basis of the RIVPACS approach initially developed in the United Kingdom using invertebrates. When the observed and expected assemblages match the O/E score is 1. An O/E score less than 1 means some impact and more than 1 suggests better than expected biota. This scoping trial of the feasibility of a fish predictive RIVPACS type bioassessment using the New Zealand Freshwater Fish Database (NZFFDB) and predictive models of fish distribution from the Freshwater Ecosystems of New Zealand (FENZ) was not successful. This study revealed that the predictive bioassessment approach in this case failed mainly due to the lack of suitable predictive models for this not because of problems with the predictive bioassessment approach. The problem with the available FENZ fish predictions used in this study is that they were developed to predict how the fish assemblages are today allowing for many land-use impacts rather than the predictions of the assemblages that would be expected in the absence of impacts crucial to RIVPACS type models. Regional O/E fish models have been successfully applied with fish in New Zealand by taking all the steps in the RIVPACS process but have generally not been taken up by resource managers. To validate the data used in this study an Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) was successfully applied to the observed (NZFFDB) and predicted fish assemblages (FENZ) and revealed their suitability for bioassessment. However, an assessment of the observed/expected IBI results was, like the fish community O/E unsuccessful, again because the predictions are for actual rather than expected fish communities. The conclusions from this study are that predictive bioassessment models have great potential for use in New Zealand but there are no shortcuts. Consequently, new predictive models must be produced based on reference sites and using habitat descriptors that are least influenced by human impacts. In the meantime the IBI is a useful measure of the biotic integrity of freshwater in New Zealand, and improvements in sampling will mean that the IBI can be updated and improved.

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  • An evaluation of clinical supervision of allied health professionals from two district health boards: A preliminary summary report

    O'Donoghue, KB

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    Massey University

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  • Australia in the South Pacific

    Powles, AR

    Report
    Massey University

    Commissioned piece on the Australia in the South Pacific following the release of the 2016 Defence White Paper

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  • Caring for the Last 3%: Telehealth Potential and Broadband Implications for Remote Australia

    Dods, S; Freyne, J; Alem, L; Nepal, S; Li, J; Jang-Jaccard, J

    Report
    Massey University

    Australians living in remote regions of our nation live with far poorer health outcomes than those in our regional and urban areas. The gaps in health service availability and outcomes between people in urban areas and those in remote parts of our country are well known. Telehealth, the provision of health related services at a distance using technology assisted communications, offers a means to narrow this gap by improving the level and diversity of services in remote areas.

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  • Global media monitoring project national report: New Zealand

    Fountaine, SL

    Report
    Massey University

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  • Optimizing the global environmental benefits of transport biofuels

    Sims, REH

    Report
    Massey University

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  • Biodiversity of the Kermadec Islands and offshore waters of the Kermadec Ridge: report of a coastal, marine mammal and deep-sea survey (TAN1612)

    Clark, MR; Trnski, T; Constantine, R; Aguirre, JD; Barker, J; Betty, E; Bowden, DA; Connell, A; Duffy, C; George, S; Hannam, S; Liggins, LJ; Middleton, C; Mills, S; Pallentin, A; Reikkola, L; Sampey, A; Sewell, M; Spong, K; Stewart, A; Stewart, R; Struthers, C; van Oosterom, L

    Report
    Massey University

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  • The New Zealand rental sector

    Witten, KL; Wall, M; Carroll, P; Telfar Barnard, L; Asiasiga, L; Graydon-Guy, T; Huckle, T; Scott, K

    Report
    Massey University

    This report contains the results of a three-phase study of the New Zealand private rental housing sector in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin. Phase one analysed relevant Census data; phase two (July-December 2015) surveyed 1099 tenants and 406 landlords using Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI); phase three (January-June 2016) involved follow-up in-depth interviews with 86 tenants and 38 landlords. The results are summarised in the Executive Summary in three sections: analyses of Census data (Section One); CATI and follow-up interviews with tenants (Section Two); CATI and follow-up interviews with landlords (Section Three). These are followed by key points from the Discussion.

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  • UK Degree Apprenticeships a Year in Review – A focus on the digital & technology solutions professional degree apprenticeship at Manchester Metropolitan University.

    Goodyer, JE

    Report
    Massey University

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  • Smoothing the path to transition

    Emerson, L; Kilpin, K; Feekery, AJ

    Report
    Massey University

    This report is the key project output from a two-year, $200,000 TLRI-funded PAR research project centred on exploring the perceived academic literacy gap in the transition from secondary to tertiary learning contexts. The research adopted an academic literacy pedagogy to connect writing and critical thinking with disciplinary knowledge development, rather than a writing skills pedagogy often adopted in academic preparation courses and learning support centres, which tends to focus on structural element of writing. The project sought to understand the academic learning demands and teaching practices in Year 13 and first year university courses, and, through the recognition of key elements of difference in approaches to teaching academic literacy, develop ways to bridge the expectation gap, thereby smoothing the transition into tertiary learning demands. Key interventions were developed to familiarise secondary teachers and students to tertiary learning demands and expectations via university visits and collaborative exploration of academic literacy and IL opportunities inherent in NCEA unit standards and assessments. The research identified key pressures on secondary teachers, particularly the perceived accountability pressure of NCEA achievement, and a lack of strategic instruction centred on academic literacy, and particularly IL, which emerged as a key element for further investigation in secondary schools. The TLRI fund is a highly contested research fund, with an emphasis on partnerships between teachers and researchers to improve educational outcomes for learners.

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  • High resolution monitoring of nitrate in agricultural catchments – a case study on the Manawatu River, New Zealand

    Burkitt, LL; Jordan, P; Singh, R; Elwan, A

    Report
    Massey University

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  • Protecting Civilians in an Urban Conflict Lessons Learned from Australia’s Deployment Following the Timor Leste Crisis 2006-2007

    Powles, AR; Cox, B

    Report
    Massey University

    The protection of civilians in urban conflict environments is a dynamic of contemporary peacekeeping operations which has received far less attention than it deserves. Urban zones are fast becoming the new territories of conflict and violence and this, what has been termed, the “new military urbanism”, is recognised within contemporary military doctrine1 as a defining feature of modern warfare and armed conflict. However, inadequate consideration of the implications of urban epicentres of conflict on the protection of civilians has been given in the context of peacekeeping operations. The specific characteristics and dynamics of violence generated by an urban environment create unique challenges for the protection of civilians and have considerable implications for how peacekeepers implement protection of civilian mandates.

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