1,279 results for Open Polytechnic

  • Embedding research literacies in the Open Polytechnic Social Work degree: Reflecting on the challenges.

    Furness, J. (2013-11)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

    Reviewing current literature on embedding research and information literacies in undergraduate academic disciplines uncovers different ways of implementing these literacies at the curriculum level in tertiary education programmes. In 2012, the Open Polytechnic of New Zealand began developing the Bachelor of Social Work programme, a four year degree provided by distance. Rather than include a research methods course in the programme, it was decided to integrate research and information literacy skills into all Social Work courses by including specific learning activities that related to formative and summative assessed research literacy learning outcomes. As the Liaison Librarian for Social Work, I was asked to provide the specialist input into the programme’s course development in research literacies. This presentation will focus on the approach that has been undertaken, the challenges of working in a multidisciplinary team, lessons learned to date and our progressing trajectory.

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  • The forms and functions of hybridity in Allan Sealy’s The Trotter-nama.

    Furness, J. (2012)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    The Trotter-nama by Allan Sealy is a novel written in magical realist style that covers the lives of seven generations of Trotters, an Anglo-Indian family whose lineage in India began with Justin Trottoire, a French mercenary, in the 1750’s. This research essay examines how the concept of hybridity in The Trotter-nama serves to break down the hierarchical binary logic of pure/impure, original/copy, authentic/inauthentic, whole/half, real/unreal, true/false notions within the context of the colonial encounter in British India. It examines the forms and functions of hybridity in the novel, interrogating its application within post-colonial theory and selecting textual enactments of racial and cultural hybridity that support the unravelling of such binary oppositions. Sealy’s purpose in destabilising the binary logic of colonialism that still pervades much of Western thought is to create a narrative and mythological space for the racially mixed Anglo-Indians who were written out of any official history of British India. Through the narrative mode of ‘magical realism’, Sealy situates Anglo-Indians at the centre of the colonial encounter, erasing determinate borders between the literal and metaphorical, thereby creating a new discourse that is as legitimate as any existing, authoritative ones. Sealy is not however, suggesting that this is the definitive account of the Anglo-Indian community in India, for there is no such true or original record. There are only multiple stories of multiple identities that shift and change over time.

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  • Experiences of developing virtual presentations.

    Natanasabapathy, P.; Joshi, R. (2013-07)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • ‘Rather a lot of death’: Misreading Lauris Edmond’s Late Song as an intentional last collection.

    Lentle-Keenan, S. (2013)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    The article discusses the history of Lauris Edmond's posthumously published Late Song. It argues that editorial invention means that the work cannot be considered a final instalment of autobiography.

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  • From the Antipodes: embedded librarians at the Open Polytechnic of New Zealand.

    Fields, A. J.; Clarke, P. S. (2014)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    The authors of the book’s 12 chapters, academic librarians representing a broad range of colleges and universities, explore the evolution of the embedded librarian from physical to virtual, suggest how to develop and implement unique programs in and out of the classroom and explain how to scale programs once they are embedded.

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  • You are not worth the risk: Lawful discrimination in hiring.

    Scholes, V. (2014)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Increasing empirical research on productivity supports the use of statistical or ‘rational’ discrimination in hiring. The practice is legal for features of job applicants not covered by human rights discrimination laws, such as being a smoker, residing in a particular neighbourhood or being a particular height. The practice appears largely morally innocuous under existing philosophical accounts of wrongful discrimination. This paper argues that lawful statistical discrimination treats job applicants in a way that may be considered degrading, and is likely to constrain people’s freedoms in relation to employment, thus giving us reason for moral concern.

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  • LIS undergraduate education in New Zealand: Development and contemporary issues.

    Cossham, A. F.; Wellstead, P.; Welland, S. (2014)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    This chapter reviews and discusses Library and Information Science (LIS) undergraduate education in New Zealand over the past 30 years, and identifies issues and research needs. It examines contemporary issues facing LIS education in a rapidly changing information environment, affected by a particular historical and social context and changes to the higher education sector nationally and internationally. Issues include professionalization, the tension between education and continuing professional development, the difficulty of keeping programmes up to date and reflective of industry needs in times of fiscal restraint, and the complexities of the particular student body, as well as changes in the LIS sector more generally. It highlights research needs and shows how professional associations and LIS educators are addressing these issues through a range of solutions designed to strengthen the library, records, and archives professions.

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  • An extension of real life?: Understanding the experiences of two female chatroom operators.

    Bowker, N. (2005)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Emerging forms of identity online: Opportunities for extending theorising about identity through textual analysis.

    Bowker, N. (2012)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Understanding positive subjectivities made possible online for disabled people.

    Bowker, N.; Tuffin, K. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    The ideology of individualism underlying identity and psychology's focus on a visual ontology may serve to inhibit the social value of people with disabilities. The online medium with its capacity for textual self presentation presents a potentially new environment to operate within. This study set out to explore the psychological meaning of what it meant to be online for people with disabilities. Following the tradition of discursive psychology, we focused especially on constructions of how online experience provided alternative frameworks for social positioning. Participants were recruited from various disability organisations in New Zealand and were invited to take part in an online interview. Three key linguistic resources were identified: uncontaminated judgement, exhibiting strengths, and operating independently. Embedded within these resources was the idea that the physical and attitudinal barriers, disrupting the ability of people with disabilities to display their capabilities independent of a disabled identity, are eliminated online. Consequently, being judged outside of the constraints of a disabled identity affords people with disabilities the opportunity to enjoy a more socially valued subjectivity and a more positive identity.

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  • Dicing with deception: People with disabilities' strategies for maintaining safety and identity online.

    Bowker, N.; Tuffin, K. (2003)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    The visual anonymity associated with online interaction offers people with disabilities the potential to participate in social interaction beyond the stigma of a disabled identity. In problematizing traditional notions of reality, however, the online medium also has the potential to become a deceptive social space where people with disabilities become victims of malevolent acts. Considering the dilemma surrounding the choice to participate, this study investigates how people with disabilities are managing issues of deception and harm in online contexts. A discursive psychology framework is utilized. The research was conducted in New Zealand where 21 participants with physical and sensory disabilities volunteered to participate in an online interview. Two different repertoires enabled people with disabilities to manage the dilemma of engaging in a medium where there is potential for benefit and harm. A keeping safe repertoire deployed three safety strategies to protect participants from deceptive acts. Data from several participants was also categorized under a qualified deception repertoire. This allowed participants to access new subjective experiences outside of a disabled identity and to extend their online engagement beyond keeping safe. Both repertoires maintained participants' integrity as online users.

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  • Some aspects of knowledge engineering.

    Abhary, K.; Djukic, D.; Hsu, H-Y.; Kovacic, Z.; Mulcahy, D.; Spuzic, S.; Uzunovic, F. (2011)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Disability discourses for online identities.

    Bowker, N.; Tuffin, K. (2002)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Beneficial effects of the online medium have been reported for disabled people in terms of providing a 'levelling ground' where they can be treated on their merits as a person, rather than as a disabled person. If this occurs because impairment is invisible online, how then are disabled people managing disability disclosure within this social context? This paper addresses this issue discursively. Participants were recruited from various disability organisations in New Zealand and were invited to take part in an online interview. A 'choice to disclose' repertoire was identified and was organised around three key resources: relevance, anonymity and normality. Embedded within each resource is the idea that the presence or absence of impairment is constructed as a feature controlled by the individual. Positioning identity within a subjectivity removed from impairment was made possible through these resources and was valued by participants. Political implications associated with the absence of impairment are discussed.

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  • Are women occupying positions of power on-line?: Demographics of chat room operators.

    Bowker, N.; Liu, J. H. (2001)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Internet statistics indicate a reduction in the gender discrepancy online. Yet, what is the situation within specific online communities like Internet Relay Chat (IRC)? Likewise, what is the gender status of those occupying positions of power online? An exploratory study of chat room operators (those who govern chat rooms) was conducted to investigate gender differences in operator's demographic characteristics and IRC experience. Whether those less satisfied with their real-life occupation were attracted to chat room operator positions was also investigated. A survey of 423 chat room operators was administered, comprising 25% women. Real-life occupations of chat room operators covered a broad spectrum, from professional and managerial to service, sales, and production workers, as well as those not employed. The most common occupational category cited was student, with very similar proportions of men and women occupying high-status positions. Of the occupations listed, 23% fell within the IT industry, with significantly more male than female operators working in this area. Majorities of both genders were satisfied with their real-life occupation. There was no relationship between job satisfaction and IRC experience or time spent as chat room operator. There were no gender differences for IRC experience. Majorities of both genders had been using IRC for 1 to 3 years or more, used IRC daily, and spent most or all of their time on IRC as operators. Ages ranged from 11 to 66 years, with the mean age 25 years. Women were significantly older than men. A significant proportion of men and women were from North America.

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  • Understanding online communities through multiple methodologies combined under a postmodern research endeavour.

    Bowker, N. (2001)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Traditionally triangulation has been used for integrating multiple epistemologies. However such procedures have been criticised for failing to deal with the divergent realities encompassing alternative methodologies. An example of a postmodern methodological approach combining both positivist and interpretivist epistemologies is offered for studying online communities. Three diverse studies were employed to investigate the extent to which chatroom participants took advantage of the online medium to explore their identity. A quantitative survey of over 400 chatroom operators, a thematic analysis of in-depth interviews with five experienced chatroom users and an ethnography were employed. Survey results highlighted the importance of gender in determining the degree of identity exploration. However the remaining studies moved beyond the centrality of users' real life gender to demonstrate the significance of other factors. The ethnography highlighted the influence of both culturally stereotyped gender behaviour in constraining identity exploration, and possibilities for exploring identity through IRC's contextual features. In-depth interviews illustrated participants' conceptions of altering gender identity as a mechanism for protection or experimentation. Paradoxically constructions highlighted the importance of maintaining stability in one's online identity. Discussion focuses on the strengths of using multiple approaches which integrate the researcher's and the participants' own situated knowledge, rather than reducing understandings to single, monolithic frameworks.

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  • Transcending operating barriers online for disabled bodies.

    Bowker, N.; Tuffin, K. (2006)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    People with disabilities often face physical, social, and psychological barriers in daily life because of inaccessible structures and disability prejudice. The online medium's physically, nontaxing capacity for participation as well as a lack of visually mediated cues can potentially eliminate such barriers. This study discursively explored the psychological meaning of what it meant to be online for people with disabilities, focusing on possibilities for operating beyond their standard practices in daily life. Participants were recruited from various disability organisations in New Zealand and were invited to take part in an online interview. The notion of transcending barriers to participation formed a broad pattern in participants' data. This talk comprised 3 linguistic resources: life-altering, overcoming physical barriers, and disconnecting disability. Each resource offered participants a highly positive and significant transformation in subjectivity, enabling people with disabilities to be positioned as equal members of society.

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  • The Embedded librarian: Online forums and information literacies.

    Furness, J.; Kelly, G.; Rishworth, R. (2012-08)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Corporate governance in Malaysia: Cosiness, cronyism and corruption.

    Chang, A. L. (2014)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Bibliographic records in an online environment

    Cossham, A. F. (2013-08)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper won the award for the best paper at conference.

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  • The role distance learning has to play in offender education.

    Seelig, C.; Rate, L. (2014)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    This article looks into the uses of digital and online tools in distance learning to improve literacy and numeracy of offenders in New Zealand prisons. Looking at the benefits and restrictions of digital education within the prison environment, this article discusses the solutions that Open Polytechnic, in partnership with the the New Zealand Government, has put in place to give prisoners further opportunity for rehabilitation, and ultimately prepare them for re-entry into society, the workforce or further study.

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