1,279 results for Open Polytechnic

  • Debating literacy in the centre community.

    Hamer, J.; Adams, P. (2010)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Discovering ICT : how technology can assist assessment and documentation.

    Fagan, T. J. (2006)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Discusses using ICT to improve documentation and assessment methods of children in playcentres. ICT is more than a game-based resource and encompasses digital cameras, scanners, video cameras and photocopiers - all of which can be used to document learning for children.

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  • Early childhood teachers' experiences and perceptions of diversity: Expressions of success and challenges

    Barker, A.; Rosewarne, S. (2009)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Transitions and home-based care : a literature review

    Everiss, L. (2010)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    This literature review on the transition of young children from home to early childhood settings was undertaken as part of the Centre of Innovation (COI) project carried out by Hutt Family Day Care, Lower Hutt, in 2006-7. It has the potential to inform and guide practices for children settling into and moving between home and home-based or other early childhood settings, and between early childhood settings and school.

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  • Everything in moderation: processes and practices in teacher education.

    Broadley, Mary-Liz; Hill, D. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Exploring transition through collective biographical memory work: Considerations for parents and teachers in early childhood education

    Rosewarne, S.; White, E.; Wright, L. (2010)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper describes our exploration of the concept of transition using the methodology of collective biographical memory work (CBMW). Through analysis of a collective group of memories across the life span, we reconceptualise transition as a discursively constructed concept that is experienced as deeply confronting. Using this methodological platform, we argue for a broader view of transition that embraces a multilayered, multifaceted and complex construction which is located in the embodied and subjectified experience of the learner and those around them. As such, transition is re-viewed as a process of uncertainty/certainty, powerlessness/powerfulness and loss/gain characterised by shifting identities rather than as a type of societal initiation ritual or rite of passage. By considering this view in the context of early childhood education discourse, we suggest that emotional/embodied aspects of transition from the perspective of the child warrant further attention. The extent to which transition plays a role in learning lies, therefore, in its constructed worth to the learner rather than to those who dictate the learning agenda.

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  • Early childhood curricula from 2 corners of the world.

    Veim, I. (2004)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Great expectations? Stepping into the shoes of a group of 4 year old readers, their parents, teachers and peers.

    Margrain, V. G. (2006)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

    Case studies of 11 4-year-old precocious readers highlighted that parents, teachers, the children's peers, and the children themselves have differing expectations of children, and of education in the early years

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  • Field-based early childhood teacher education : "but are they already teachers ...".

    Brennan, M.; Everiss, L.; Mara, D. (2011)

    Report
    Open Polytechnic

    Despite its long history in early childhood initial teacher education (ITE) programmes, there remains a limited research base about the nature of the field-based approach and more specifically student/tutor interactions in the tertiary classroom. This study adds to a growing area of scholarship that seeks to articulate a distinct pedagogical base to field-based teacher education. The tertiary classroom was chosen as the site of study because it affords researchers and teachers opportunity to place an intense focus on students and tutors 'doing field-based teacher education' and to explore new understandings that sit apart from traditional preservice ITE approaches.

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  • Extensions on Te Wheke.

    Love, C. (2004)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    Te Wheke, or The Octopus model of health, as developed and presented by Rangimarie Rose Pere, has become a central part of many training and education programmes in this country. It has been used particularly in the arenas of health and mental health, education and social services training. The model is seen to be applicable across a range of contexts and is perceived as being a holistic model of health and well-being that is amenable to in depth examination and development. Te Wheke, the model, presents the octopus as a symbol representing the whanau, hapu or iwi. Each of the eight tentacles of the octopus represents a dimension of selfhood, and the numerous suckers on each tentacle represent the many aspects within each dimension. The tentacles of the octopus are overlapping and intertwined to symbolise the interconnected and inseparable nature of the dimensions. The dimensions of the octopus, represented by the tentacles as identified by Pere are: wairua, mana ake, mauri, whanaungatanga, tinana, hinengaro, whatumanawa, ha a koro ma a kuia ma. The model proposes that sustenance is required for each tentacle/dimension if the organism is to attain waiora or total well-being. Pere defines healthy Maori selfhood in terms of waiora or total well-being. Traditionally, waiora refers to the seed of life. It is a concept which incorporates the foundations of life and existence and the total well-being and development of people. Pere presents te wheke (the octopus) as a symbol representing the whanau (family unit) and, by extension, the hap? (sub-tribe) and/or the iwi (tribe or people). The model illustrates a Maori view that sees healthy individual selfhood as intertwined with and inseparable from the health of the whanau; the health of the whanau as inseparable from that of the hapu, and the health and well-being of hapu as indivisible from that of iwi. Thus, the model is applicable to individuals and to small and large groups. Pere's model, along with other models of healthy Maori selfhood, provides a framework within which dimensions may be explored and understood in a number of ways. In order to extend the picture provided by Te Wheke for those unfamiliar with Maori epistemology, this monograph illustrates the dimensions symbolised in Te Wheke and some of the aspects within these dimensions. In so doing, it interweaves the narratives of Pere and others who have written about selected aspects of the dimensions encompassed by Te Wheke. It draws on established literature relating to aspects of the dimensions, re-presenting the narratives of recognised elders and experts, in order to provide a more detailed view of some of the aspects of relevance to understanding of Maori health and well-being. It is noted, however, that the very process of selecting aspects of the various dimensions as presented by some individuals and not others does result in the presentation of a partial picture. There will inevitably be more left unsaid than said. It is acknowledged that the views presented here represent some of many possible narratives around the eight dimensions of Pere's Te Wheke model.

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  • Ka pai well done: Student-teacher perceptions of assessment feedback in open distance learning.

    Margrain, V. G.; Everiss, L. (2008)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Exploring literacy with infants from a sociocultural perspective.

    Hamer, J. (2005)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    The way in which we view literacy impacts on how we view the process of literacy learning as well as how we view infants as literacy learners. If literacy is viewed narrowly as a set of reading and writing skills then the process of literacy learning becomes limited to the acquisition and refining of these skills. From this perspective our view of infants as literacy learners is strictly limited to what the infant is or is not capable of doing. However, when viewed from a sociocultural perspective, literacy becomes a contextually based, broad concept that is grounded in social practice. Literacy learning then becomes much more than acquiring skills but includes developing knowledge, attitudes and understandings about the forms, functions and purposes of literacy. From this perspective, infants can now be seen as active and capable literacy learners as they experience and engage with a wide range of literacy practices in their everyday contexts. This sociocultural approach to literacy also has some important implications for the way literacy for infants is viewed within the New Zealand early childhood curriculum, Te Wh!riki (Ministry of Education, 1996),and how educators can support and facilitate literacy learning with infants within the early childhood education context.

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  • It's moments like these: Dispute resolution protocols and practices within practica.

    Broadley, Mary-Liz (2010)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Learning dispositions: Early childhood and tertiary perspectives

    Margrain, V. G. (2005)

    Seminar Paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Let's get theoretical. Walking the talk of socio-culturalism.

    Brennan, M. (2008)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Great expectations: Stepping into the shoes of a group of 4-year-old readers, their parents, teachers and peers.

    Margrain, V. G. (2007)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    Case studies of 11 4-year-old precocious readers highlighted that parents, teachers, the children's peers, and the children themselves have differing expectations of children, and of education in the early years. In this doctoral study, parents tried to balance children's social and emotional well-being with the need for their children to be challenged. Although the parents did not focus on academic factors exclusively, they were the key advocates for academic challenge and extension. The children themselves had a yearning to learn, were self-reflective and also enjoyed competition. They demonstrated literacy abilities many years in advance of their chronological age that had been acquired without having been formally taught. The children's teachers and peers, however, dissuaded competition and instead strongly encouraged the children to conform to expectations association with being 'normal', and 'acting like 4-year-olds'. The findings of this study show the impact of diverse perspectives, values and expectations on children, and how the children mediate expectations of them. Theoretical perspectives for this study include social constructivism, cognitive constructivism and the bioecological perspective. For precocious readers, no single theoretical perspective explained the children's learning. Expectations of young children in schools and early childhood settings reflect social constructivist beliefs of their teachers and peers. However, the abilities of precocious readers clearly demonstrated individual cognitive construction. In supporting their children, the parents modelled flexible approaches that could be linked to multiple perspectives. Approaches that were the most supportive for the children were those that recognised multiple influences and responded to the children's individuality.

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  • Literacy learning in Australia: Practical ideas for early childhood educators.

    Barratt-Pugh, C.; Rivalland, J.; Hamer, J.; Adams, P. (2006)

    Book
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Mixed age settings: What happens for young children.

    Fagan, T. J. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Literacy in early childhood education.

    Hamer, J. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Mixed age settings: Younger and older together.

    Fagan, T. J. (2006)

    Seminar
    Open Polytechnic

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