557 results for The University of Auckland Library, Book

  • Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account

    Brock, G (2009)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Nietzsche

    Wicks, Robert (2010)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A Companion to Aesthetics

    Davies, S (2009)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Lapita: Ancestors and Descendants

    Sheppard, P (2009)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Urban Morphology, Architectural Typology and Cities in Transition

    Tian, Y; Gu, Kai; Tao, W (2014)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Changing practices for changing times: Past, present and future possibilities for self-study research: Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Self-study of Teacher Education Practices

    Various authors (2014)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Sportswomen at the Olympics

    Bruce, T; Hovden, J; Markula, P (2010)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Te Puna: Māori art from Te Tai Tokerau Northland

    Brown, Deidre; Ellis, Ngarino; Clarke, Chanel; Mane-Wheoki, Jonathan; Toi, Maihi; Martin, Debbie (2007-07-09)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Husserl: A Guide for the Perplexed

    Russell, Matheson (2006)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Public policy and ethnicity: The Politics of Ethnic Boundary Making

    Rata, Elizabeth; Openshaw, Roger (2006)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Gitksan phonotactics

    Brown, Jason (2010)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    This work presents an analysis of the phonotactics of Gitksan, a Tsimshianic language spoken in northern British Columbia, Canada, and is based on an electronic lexical database of the language compiled by the author. The results of this study reveal that Gitksan exhibits several gradient phonological restrictions on consonantal cooccurrence that hold over the lexicon. There is a gradient restriction on homorganic consonants, and within homorganic pairs, there is a gradient restriction on major class and manner features. It is claimed that these restrictions are due to a generalized Obligatory Contour Principle (OCP) effect in the grammar, and that this effect can be relativized to subsidiary features, such as place, manner, etc. It is argued that these types of effects are most naturally analyzed with the system of weighted constraints employed in Harmonic Grammar. In addition to these dissimilatory effects, it is also claimed that Gitksan exhibits a gradient assimilatory effect among specific consonants. This type of effect is rare, and is unexpected given the general conditions of dissimilation in the language. One such effect is the frequency of both pulmonic pairs of consonants and ejective pairs of consonants, which occur at rates higher than expected by chance. Another is the occurrence of uvular-uvular and velar-velar pairs of consonants, which also occur at rates higher than chance. This pattern is somewhat surprising, as there exists an overall gradient prohibition on cooccurring pairs of dorsal consonants. These assimilatory patterns are analyzed using the Agreement by Correspondence approach, which mandates that output correspondents agree for some phonological feature. The analysis presented in this work has implications for other areas of the phonology of Gitksan, and for phonological theory generally. These areas include the representation of laryngeal features and of the "guttural" class of consonants, the learnability of gradient patterns, and the role that constraints play in both dissimilatory and assimilatory effects.

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  • He kohikohinga rangahau: a bibliography of Māori and psychology research

    Hollis, H; Cooper, Erana; Braun, V; Pomare, P (2010-09)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • European register of marine species : a check-list of the marine species in Europe and a bibliography of guides to their identification

    Costello, Mark (2001)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    The foundation of biodiversity research and management is correctly identifying and naming species, but different names are used for the same species, and the same names for different species, in different parts of Europe. The present volume is the first coordinated attempt to list the marine species plants, algae, invertebrates, vertebrates from all over the European seas, from the Arctic and Iceland to the Canaries, the Mediterranean and the Baltic. The main part of the volume is a checklist of some 30,000 valid species, for certain groups supplemented by synonymies and basic distribution information. A bibliographical section points to ca. 700 identification guides. The volume is the collective work of 170 persons who contributed their expertise to the European Register of Marine Species (ERMS), a project part-funded by the European Commission (EC) Marine Science and Technology (MAST) research programme. It is anticipated that the European Register of Marine Species will become a standard reference tool for marine biodiversity training, research and management in Europe. It is anticipated that the European Register of Marine Species will become a standard reference tool for marine biodiversity training, research and management in Europe

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  • Image and Video Technology: 6th Pacific-Rim Symposium, PSIVT 2013, Guanajuato, Mexico, October 28-November 1, 2013. Proceedings

    (2014)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the 6th Pacific Rim Symposium on Image and Video Technology, PSIVT 2013, held in Guanajuato, México in October/November 2013. The total of 43 revised papers was carefully reviewed and selected from 90 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on image/video processing and analysis, image/video retrieval and scene understanding, applications of image and video technology, biomedical image processing and analysis, biometrics and image forensics, computational photography and arts, computer and robot vision, pattern recognition, and video surveillance.

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  • Concise Computer Vision: An Introduction into theory and algorithms

    Klette, Reinhard (2014)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Concise Computer Vision provides an accessible general introduction to the essential topics in computer vision, highlighting the role of important algorithms and mathematical concepts. Classroom-tested programming exercises and review questions are also supplied at the end of each chapter.

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  • The Scope and Intensity of Substantive Review: Traversing Taggart's Rainbow

    Various authors (2015)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Responding to and building on the work of Professor Michael Taggart, this book brings together essays on two contrasting issues concerning the scope and intensity of substantive grounds of review. Firstly, whether and to what extent review on substantive grounds such as unreasonableness, proportionality and substantive legitimate expectations should be expanded and intensified; and secondly, whether review on illegality grounds should ever retreat from the usual correctness standard. Fundamental rights as grounds of review raise both of these questions, and a separate part is devoted to them. Taggart's support for expansion of substantive grounds of review was of a piece with his recognition of the need for judicial restraint or deference in appropriate contexts. The latter took the form both of his ultimate opposition to proportionality as a ground for review in non-rights cases and of his support for varying intensity review under the illegality heading. Such awareness of the bigger picture and the need for balance within it is in short supply in the literature. This book is intended to continue Taggart's work in putting the pieces of the jigsaw back together.

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  • At the Crossroads of Crisis and Opportunity: Interdisciplinary Conversations

    (2015)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Can crises and opportunities truly go hand in hand? The twelve chapters in this interdisciplinary collection provide a number of telling perspectives and conversational approaches that reflect upon the serious implications of this important question. They overwhelmingly agree that difficult crises events inevitably force individuals and societies to crossroads in their lives where they must make challenging personal and collective choices. Nonetheless, they also confirm that even faced with apparently new terrain and the confusing cartography of discomforting change there are unique and opportune pathways of response that can lead to positive developmental destinations. Attending to this question from the personal, communal, and international perspectives, in dialogue, academics and practitioners from around the globe interrogate this possibility linking the threads between the processes and conditions in which opportunities borne of crises might flounder or be assisted to flourish.

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  • Religious Worlds of the Laity in Late Antique Gaul

    Bailey, Lisa (2016-04-07)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Christianity in the late antique world was not imposed but embraced, and the laity were not passive members of their religion but had a central role in its creation. This volume explores the role of the laity in Gaul, bringing together the fields of history, archaeology and theology. First, this book follows the ways in which clergy and monks tried to shape and manufacture lay religious experience. They had themselves constructed the category of 'the laity', which served as a negative counterpart to their self-definition. Lay religious experience was thus shaped in part by this need to create difference between categories. The book then focuses on how the laity experienced their religion, how they interpreted it and how their decisions shaped the nature of the Church and of their faith. This part of the study pays careful attention to the diversity of the laity in this period, their religious environments, ritual engagement, behaviours, knowledge and beliefs.The first volume to examine laity in this period in Gaul – a key region for thinking about the transition from Roman rule to post-Roman society – The Religious Worlds of the Laity in Late Antique Gaul fills an important gap in current literature.

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  • Chronic illness: the temporal thief

    Jowsey, Tanisha (2016-06-29)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Chronic illness is experienced in and through time. As the term ‘chronic’ suggests, the chronically ill body is one that reorients itself to the ways in which time is perceived, experienced and used, in a multiply of ways. New practices are developed and routines are established to manage chronic illness in personal and social contexts. As rhythms of bodily life change one’s expectations for the future might change, and their relations with other people (who have their own temporal rhythms) might also change. Meanings attributed to past and present experiences and practices, as well as future plans and imaginings, acquire new significance with chronic illness. For many people, chronic illness is experienced as a thief, stealing their imagined futures. Through public health and anthropological lenses this book investigates intersections between chronic illness and time.

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  • A short grammar of Urama

    Brown, Jason; Muir, A; Craig, K; Anea, K (2016)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Urama (ISO: 639-3 kiw) is a language spoken primarily on Urama Island in Papua New Guinea. It is spoken in the Gulf Province, in the vicinity of Deception Bay, in the Era River Delta. Urama is part of the Kiwai language family, which is distributed along the south coast of Papua New Guinea. The Kiwai family in turn belongs to the larger Trans New Guinea stock.1 Within the Kiwai family, Urama belongs to the North-Eastern group, along with Arigibi, Gibaio, and Kope (also referred to as Gope) (Wurm 1973). The name ‘Urama’ is used to refer to the language, the ethnic group, and the island. A native Urama individual is termed Urama mere ‘Urama person’. Urama Island is in the Kikori district. Preliminary numbers for the 2011 census indicate the entire district has a population of 41,232. Official numbers of inhabitants on Urama Island are more difficult to obtain; however, Wurm (1971:139) has estimated the population of Urama speakers at around 1500. Foley (1986:233) estimated the population of North-Eastern Kiwai (presumably including Gibaio, Kope, and Urama, but not Arigibi, which Wurm & Hattori 1981 classify as a separate language²) at 3700 speakers, as has Wurm & Hattori (1981), and according to Ethnologue (Lewis et al. 2014, based on Foley’s 2011 estimates), there are 6000 speakers of North-East Kiwai (which includes Gibaio and Urama-Kope3 together). The adjacent areas speak various Kiwaian languages, and there is some mutual intelligibility between them. As Tok Pisin is one of the lingue franche of Papua New Guinea and is an official language, it is often the language of communication between those from other areas.

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