2,907 results for The University of Auckland Library, Conference item

  • The use of Te Reo in naming new species of New Zealand fauna

    Seldon, David (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • GAPSS GOSS 2014 summary report launch

    Saxton, Peter (2014-11-13)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A Question of Balance

    Abel, Susan (2010-08-08)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Today I am addressing the issue of balance in televison news, and the relative lack of Maori voices in mainstream news bulletins. I need here to explain my use of the term "mainstream". I have been uneasy about this term ever since Don Brash used it in his speech to the Orewa Rotary Club in January 2004 in a way which meant that anything or anyone outside the mainstream was suspect, and then got himself into trouble when asked to define the term more precisely. When I write I put quotation marks around the word "mainstream", so you need to imagine these everytime I use it. .....

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  • Our rights - whose responsibility?

    Lyons, Lesley (2009-09-30)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Examines key influences, tensions affecting inclusion of children with disabilities in child care centres. Juxtaposed discourses of human rights and neo-liberalism examined as influential in the access and engagement for children with disabilities

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  • Invited lecture: The Design of Teaching and Learning Materials for Seminar Discussions

    Tomlins, John (2008-10)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Biomechanical Investigations of Flow and Dynamics in Large and Small Blood Vessels

    Long, David (2008-03-11)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The business of disability: Challenges, complexities and tensions in the inclusion of children with disabilities in long day early childhood education and care.

    Lyons, Lesley (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Community management of patients with diabetes

    Daly, Barbara (2015-10-28)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Quick Fire Research Update

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  • In the race towards high-speed mobile broadband spectrum allocation is not only a matter of auction revenue

    Beltran, Hector (2014-05-30)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The already conventional way of allocating spectrum to parties interested in becoming mobile communications service providers is the simultaneous ascending auction (SAA), a mechanism that has been used and perfected over the last twenty years. A large amount of literature on spectrum auctions and key recent insights into the weaknesses of the SAA, have led researchers to propose and governments to adopt a new format which is known as the combinatorial clock auction (CCA). The auction is being popularised throughout its application in Europe, Australia and New Zealand and announcements by several other governments. As critical as the capacity of an auction to raise revenue for the government may be, its design and particular rules should respond – whenever feasible - to the broader goals set by governments, the history and current state of the mobile markets, the regulator’s goals for competition in the new or affected markets, the evolution and potential of new technologies to modify spectrum utilization efficiency and new spectrum exploitation forms allowed by authorities and sponsored by non-traditional market players. Inspired by the Colombian mobile telecommunications market, this paper reviews the process by which the government’s spectrum agency decides on the allocation of new spectrum bands to the mobile communications markets, including 4G and mobile broadband. Recent government decisions across the world on the future of the digital dividend and the search for new spectrum, on the one hand, and the increasing adoption of mobile devices everywhere, on the other, demand a serious rethinking of the processes involved in deciding how much spectrum, what frequency bands, when to allocate it and the mechanisms for allocation and assignment. This paper explores the above mentioned elements to propose a framework to the analysis of the mobile broadband spectrum allocation and assignment process. In doing so it discusses the elements the spectrum agency needs to consider in order to assess the most important issues that may have a potential impact on the efficient allocation of spectrum and, consequently, on future market development.

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  • Student self-assessment

    Brown, Gavin; Harris, LR (2013-01-01)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Increased inter-colony fusion is associated with reduced haplotype diversity in an invasive colonial ascidian Didemnum vexillum

    Smith, KF; Stefaniak, L; Saito, Y; Gemmill, CEC; Cary, SC; Fidler, Andrew (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Dense multiscale motion extraction from cardiac Cine MR tagging using HARP technology

    Florack, L; van Assen, H; Suinesiaputra, A (2007)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    We propose an operational method to extract the left ventricle (LV) systole dynamics using harmonic phase (HARP) images extracted from tagged cardiac MR sequences. Established techniques to generate HARP sequences provide independent evidence for motion extraction, in the sense that the combined linear system for scalar brightness conservation, applied to the HARP images, can be uniquely solved for a dense field of motion parameters without the need for regularization. In contrast to some of the previously proposed popular methods, no segmentation or tracking of tags over time, nor interpolation of a sparse motion field explicitly coupled to the tag pattern is required, and the problem of tag fading is bypassed. An important novelty is the incorporation of automatic local scale selection so as to obtain a robust solution, which not only yields a stable, but also a smoothly varying motion field of the (healthy) LV myocardial wall. The scheme relies on an integer parameter representing order of approximation, and allows one to simultaneously obtain a dense field of differential tensors capturing the low order differential structure of the motion field, which is useful for the computation of relevant local quantities such as strain rates and material acceleration fields. The methodology is generic and straightforward to implement, and can be generalized to 3D and, in principle, to account for higher order differential structure.

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  • Passive Ventricular Mechanics Modelling Using MRI of Structure and Function

    Wang, VY; Lam, HI; Ennis, DB; Young, AA; Nash, MP (2008)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy or myocardial infarction can develop left ventricular (LV) diastolic impairment. The LV remodels its structure and function to adapt to pathophysiological changes in geometry and loading conditions and this remodeling process can alter the passive ventricular mechanics. In order to better understand passive ventricular mechanics, a LV finite element model was developed to incorporate physiological and mechanical information derived from in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tissue tagging, in vivo LV cavity pressure recording and ex vivo diffusion tensor MRI (DTMRI) of a canine heart. MRI tissue tagging enables quantitative evaluation of cardiac mechanical function with high spatial and temporal resolution, whilst the direction of maximum water diffusion (the primary eigenvector) in each voxel of a DTMRI directly correlates with the myocardial fibre orientation. This model was customized to the geometry of the canine LV during diastasis by fitting the segmented epicardial and endocardial surface data from tagged MRI using nonlinear finite element fitting techniques. Myofibre orientations, extracted from DTMRI of the same heart, were incorporated into this geometric model using a free form deformation methodology. Pressure recordings, temporally synchronized to the tissue tagging MRI data, were used to simulate the LV deformation during diastole. Simulation of the diastolic LV mechanics allowed us to estimate the stiffness of the passive LV myocardium based on kinematic data obtained from tagged MRI. This integrated physiological model will allow more insight into the regional passive diastolic mechanics of the LV on an individualized basis, thereby improving our understanding of the underlying structural basis of mechanical dysfunction in pathological conditions.

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  • Samoan Ergatives: Analysis and Acquisition

    Charters, Areta (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Processability Theory (PT) is a theory of language acquisition which seeks to account for the order in which syntactic structures emerge in the spontaneous speech of learners in terms of the relative processing demands of different structures (Pienemann, 1998, 2005), as predicted by structural analysis in the formal framework of LFG (Bresnan, 1982, 2001). To date, PT has been applied primarily to Nominative-Accusative languages of Indo-European origins. This paper reports on an analysis of data from child speakers of an Ergative Austronesian language, Samoan in the framework of LFG.

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  • Aires Mateus: Making Emptiness

    Jenner, Gordon (2015)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Severe speech and language difficulties in school aged children from language unit and mainstream settings: A qualitative study of parental experiences

    Fraser, Kelly; Purdy, Suzanne (2008)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: Reflecting Connections 2008, the second conference jointly hosted by the New Zealand Speech-Language Therapists Association and Speech Pathology Australia. Held at the SKYCITY Convention Centre in Auckland, New Zealand, from the 25th to the 29th of May, 2008. http://www.reflectingconnections.co.nz/ Semi-structured interviews were conducted with sixteen parents to investigate their experiences of having a child with a severe speech and language disorder. Seven parents had children in primary mainstream education, seven had children in a language unit setting within a primary school, and two parents of older children completing their education took part. Content and thematic analyses were performed on the transcribed data. Nine key content areas were identified in the transcriptions of parents whose children were in both educational settings: early intervention, pathways, experience of language unit, experience of mainstream, other educational settings, support, parental involvement, impact on family, and optimising outcomes. A thematic analysis identified the following themes that describe the parents’ experiences and perceptions: (1) seeking support, (2) optimising solutions/finding a best fit, (3) concern for the future, (4) satisfaction/dissatisfaction with school, (5) access to support, (6) relationships, and (7) “idealised” solutions/finding a perfect world.

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  • Bringing Another Empire Alive? The Empire Marketing Board and the Construction of Dominion Identity, 1926-33

    Barnes, F (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Repartnering parents and their children

    Cartwright, Patricia (2006)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Application of Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) to flow and velocity profile measurement of milk in a horizontal pipe

    Sharifi, Mohadeseh; Young, B (2011-12)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In order to achieve an acceptable final product quality in the dairy industry, strict regulations on monitoring and control of various aspects of milk such as temperature, pressure, flow, concentration, composition hygiene, taste and smell have been imposed (Bylund, 1995). The target of this technology, which is the production of products which fulfil all qualitative requirements (Pisecky, 1997), together with decreased energy consumption, reduced waste and minimized costs, can be achieved through automatic process control. In the milk powder production process, a multistage process in which the function of each stage affects the final product quality, having accurate and multidimensional knowledge of the process state in different stages of the process is crucial in order to maintain satisfactory control of a process. ...

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  • Path Independent Choice and the Ranking of Opportunity Sets

    Ryan, Matthew (2012-02)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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