265 results for The University of Auckland Library, Conference poster

  • Te Punga and the Net Generation

    Wilkinson, Elizabeth; Sutton, Megan (2006)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Our existing Voyager catalogue tutorial was text-heavy and decontextualised— detached from student experience, youth culture and the research process. The aim was to create a student-centred tutorial, applying sound learning principles, providing relevant contexts for first year students and using Net Gen modes to convey the information.

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  • ResearchSpace@Auckland : Disaster Recovery (DR)

    Latt, Yin Yin; Hayes, Leonie (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The University of Auckland Library and Information Technology Services have partnered to provide a DSpace installation utilising a mature IT infrastructure. The application is hosted on the University of Auckland’s virtual server cluster in the recently completed “City Data Centre” along with other enterprise systems. ResearchSpace is operational 24x7 and has a Disaster Recovery mirror located at a second location. Handle identifiers are maintained between the two systems to ensure users can submit items at all times.

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  • Approximated Ground Truth for Stereo and Motion Analysis on Real-World Sequences (Poster)

    Liu, Zhifeng; Klette, Reinhard (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: The 3rd Pacific-Rim Symposium on Image and Video Technology (PSIVT2009) Tokyo, Japan, January 13th—16th, 2009 http://psivt2009.nii.ac.jp/ We approximate ground truth for real-world stereo sequences and demonstrate its use for the performance analysis of a few selected stereo matching and optic flow techniques. Basically we assume zero roll and constant tilt of an ego-vehicle (for about 10 seconds) driving on a planar road.

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  • Inclusion of a Second-Order Prior into Semi-Global Matching. (2009)

    Hermann, Simon; Klette, Reinhard; Destenfanis, Eduardo (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: The 3rd Pacific-Rim Symposium on Image and Video Technology (PSIVT2009) Tokyo, Japan, January 13th—16th, 2009 http://psivt2009.nii.ac.jp/ We consider different parameter settings for SGM, suggest to include a second order prior into the smoothness term of the energy function, and propose and test a new cost function. Some preprocessing (edge images) proves to be of value for improving SGM stereo results on real-world data.

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  • Recovery Rate of Clustering Algorithms. (2009)

    Li, Fajie; Klette, Reinhard (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: The 3rd Pacific-Rim Symposium on Image and Video Technology (PSIVT2009) Tokyo, Japan, January 13th—16th, 2009 http://psivt2009.nii.ac.jp/ We provide a simple and general way for defining the recovery rate of clustering algorithms using a given family of old clusters for evaluating the performance when calculating a family of new clusters. The recovery rate may be calculated by using an approximate and efficient algorithm.

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  • Effects of complex milk lipid components on neurodevelopment in vitro

    Lim, JH; Hodgkinson, S; Dragunow, M; Norris, C; Vickers, M (2010-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Afferent axonal pathfinding in developing chicken rhomboencephalon

    Kubke, Maria; Wild, JM (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The developing hindbrain of vertebrates i organized in a series of rhombomeres, each giving rise to specifi c nuclei. The role of this segmentation has been extensively studied with respect to the origin of motor nuclei. The development of afferent innervation, however, has received little attention. Afferent axons enter the brainstem prior to the migration of their central targets and must therefore navigate in the absence of target derived information. Since the target nuclei for each afferent component originates within discrete rhombomeric boundaries, it is possible that the same positional information that is used by neuronal progenitors to defi ne their fi nal fate, may be available to afferent axons to direct them through their initial growth. This study was aimed at determining the normal sequence that characterises the growth of afferent axons in the hindbrain within the context of the site of origin and of the organisation of second order sensory neurons within specifi c rhombomere boundaries. Afferent axons were labelled at different embryonic ages using fl uorescent lipophilic dyes. Crystals of DiI and/or DiO were placed on specifi c exposed nerves or nerve branches of fi xed embryos. Embryos were incubated at 30 C for 18 hrs, after which the hindbrains were dissected, cleared in glycerol and analysed as whole-mount preparations with confocal microscopy. Afferent axons formed a series of fascicles that extended longitudinally along the alar plate, beyond the rhombomeric boundaries that give rise to their target nuclei. At early stages, the degree of organization and segregation of afferent axons did not appear to refl ect the adult patterns. Thus, it appears that the appropriate pathfi nding and fi nal segregation of the afferent components involves an initial profuse growth into the hindbrain, and that proper afferent patterning involves axon retraction and may require the initiation of migration if the central targets towards their fi nal position.

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  • Bronchoconstriction and the MBNW: Insights from anatomical lung modelling.

    Mitchell, Jennine; Tawahi MH (2010-11-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bronchoconstriction and the MBNW: Insights from anatomical lung modelling. Jennine Mitchell and Dr Merryn Tawhai Auckland Bioengineering institute The multiple breath nitrogen washout (MBNW) is a global test of lung function that produces two indices Sacin and Scond that are reflective of ventilation heterogeneity arising at the level of acinus and between more spatially disparate regions of the lung respectively. An important application of the MBNW is in the study of asthma. Ventilation defects have been noted to occur in imaging studies of asthma. These regional ventilation defects have not previously been considered in relation to the MBNW indices. Scond is purported to be related to the state of conducting airways however no modelling studies exist which directly link the airway state to Scond. In this work regional ventilation defects have been simulated in an anatomically based human lung model and theoretically linked to the MBNW indices Sacin and Scond. Ventilation is simualted to the level of the acinus in a model in which acinar ventilation is considered independent of ventialtion in other acini. As previously indicated in modelling studies a high degree of constriction is required to produce a ventilation defect. The relationship between the degree of constriction in airways leading to the defect and the Scond index is however highly non-linear and shows a sharp decrease at very high levels of constriction. Ventilation defects potentially cause non-communication of gas trapped in the ventilation defects with the mouth. This may alter the calculation of FRC if nitrogen dilution is used to calculate FRC. As the indices are dependent on the phase III slope for each breath being normalised by FRC this alters MBNW results. The index Scond is not be able to be explained simply in terms of increased time constants due to increased resistance in the main conducting airway tree. The model indicates that the Scond index is more complex than current MBNW theory indicates and cannot be simply explained in terms of a longer time constant due to constriction in the conducting airway tree resulting in increased late emptying of poorly ventilated regions.

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  • Diabetes Management by Primary Health Care Nurses in Auckland, New Zealand

    Daly, Barbara; Arroll, B; Sheridan, N; Kenealy, T; Scragg, R (2011-11-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Methods PHC nurses in Auckland (a 26% random sample) were asked to complete postal and telephone questionnaires (86% response rate), on education, experience, knowledge and diabetes management practice, and to log their care given to diabetes patients on a randomly selected day (n=265). Results Responses were received from 287 PHC nurses (86% response rate) comprising 210 practice nurses (PN), 49 district nurses (DN) and 28 specialist nurses (SNs). Most nurses (96%) were able to identify excess body weight as a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes and elevated blood glucose levels (BGLs) or glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) (86%) for diabetes-related complications. In contrast, CV risk factors were less well identified, particularly smoking, although more by SNs (43%) than PNs (14%) and DNs (12%, p=0.0005). CV complications, especially stroke, were less well known than microvascular complications, and by significantly fewer PNs (13%) and DNs (8%) than SNs (36%, p=0.002). Stronger associations were found between nurse’s knowledge of elevated HbA1c as a risk factor for diabetes-related complications and management activities related to BGLs and medication, compared with knowledge of CV risk factors, which was not associated with assessment of blood pressure or knowledge of patient’s total cholesterol or smoking status. The median number of patients consulted on the randomly selected day was one by 38% of PNs, two by 47% of DNs and 4-5 by 57% of SNs. Overall, PNs consulted almost 60% of the patients sampled, while patients consulted by DNs were older and more likely to be European New Zealanders, tobacco uses and have diabetes-related complications and co-morbidities, while SNs consulted by Maori and Pacific patients. Conclusion: There is a need for PHC nurses to increase their knowledge of CV risk factors with more effective management required and particularly of smoking.

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  • Substrate capture mechanism provides a mode for inhibition

    Evans, Genevieve; Short, F; Castell, A; Cookson, T; Gamage, Swarnalatha; Denny, B; Baker, E; Lott, S (2011-05-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Mycobacteria tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, is responsible for more death in the world today than any other bacteria. As part of the Tuberculosis Structural Genomics Consortium (TBSGC), our research group previously determined the structure of anthranilate phosphoribosyl transferase (AnPRT) from Mtb. AnPRT is the second enzyme in the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and was identified as a potential drug target through gene knockout experiments, which resulted in a strain of Mtb that was essentially avirulent even in immunodeficient mice. AnPRT catalyses a reaction between anthranilate and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP), and the crystal structure of Mtb-AnPRT was originally determined with and without PRPP (PDB ID: 1ZVW and 2BPQ, respectively). In silico docking was used to predict the binding motif of anthranilate, the second substrate, surprisingly predicted two sites despite a 1:1 reaction ratio with PRPP. Previously, 165 compounds were screened for inhibitory action against Mtb-AnPRT. The most potent of these compounds was co-crystallized with Mtb-AnPRT and PRPP. One compound had a bianthranilate character and the 2.0 Å resolution structure of this inhibitor bound to Mtb-AnPRT (PDB ID: 3QQS) was determined by molecular replacement using the Mtb-AnPRT structure without PRPP bound (PDB ID: 1ZVW) as a search model. Interestingly, the structure revealed multiple binding motifs for the inhibitor, two of which were consistent with the previously predicted binding motifs for anthranilate. Forty analogues of this potent Mtb-AnPRT inhibitor were subsequently assayed for activity against the enzyme, several of which showed were found to be more potent inhibitors. This new series of inhibitors were docked into the 3QQS structure, providing insights for the development of more potent inhibitors. Such techniques will continue to drive design of increasingly potent inhibitors against Mtb-AnPRT for future development of a new anti-tuberculosis agent.

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  • An investigation into the teaching of extemporaneous compounding skills to pharmacy students in schools of pharmacy in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom

    Aspden, Trudi; Rew, A; Anderson, C; Tan, J; Woodrow, R; Zheng, Y (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Many countries require that registered pharmacists are competent to extemporaneously compound. In general, however, there is a lack of opportunity for interns and new pharmacists to practice extemporaneous compounding due to the reduction in demand for extemporaneously compounded products in community pharmacy. Thus it falls to schools of pharmacy to prepare future pharmacist for this role. Objectives: With respect to extemporaneous compounding to pharmacy undergraduates- to determine what is taught, how it is taught, how it is assessed and the time allocated to teaching in the different schools of pharmacy in the five countries. Methodology: Thirty eight course coordinators involved in the teaching of extemporaneous compounding from 32 schools of pharmacy in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom were invited to complete an online survey using Survey MonkeyTM. Results: Twenty four responses were obtained from participants in all five countries (response rate 63.2%). Extemporaneous compounding was a compulsory component of all the BPharm programmes. However, there was a wide inter and intra-country variation in the teaching of the subject including the number of hours dedicated to its teaching, the dosage forms included and the teaching methods used. Many schools used extemporaneous compounding teaching to introduce transferrable skills, such as the ability to accurately calculate. A strong desire to retain the teaching of extemporaneous compounding was expressed by the course coordinators. Discussion: Our results highlight differences in the extemporaneous compounding teaching of the BPharm programmes in the five countries surveyed, but also uncover its use in developing related skills.

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  • Wind power in New Zealand Renewable energy resource dynamics in a hydro-based power system

    Suomalainen, AK; Pritchard, G; Sharp, Basil; Yuan, Z; Zakeri, G (2013-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Characterisation of the Genetic and Hormone controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, K; Plummer, K; Beveridge, C; Snowden, K (2004-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Where's the Sablefish?: Exploring causes of variable sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) representation in Northwest Coast sites

    Nims, Reno; Butler, V (2015-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Using stream biofilm microbial communities as indicators of freshwater ecosystem health

    Lewis, Gillian; Ancion, PY; Lear, G; Roberts, K; Washington, V (2010-08-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stream biofilms are a complex aggregation of microorganisms embedded in a polymer matrix and cover almost every surface in freshwater environments. Because of their sedentary way of life, microorganisms associated with biofilms are affected by past and present environmental conditions and therefore constitute a potential integrative indicator of stream health. A wide range of experiments was conducted in both flow chamber microcosms and natural stream environments to investigate the main drivers of microbial community structure and composition and evaluate the potential use of biofilms as a bio-indicator of freshwater ecosystem health. Using community fingerprinting techniques such as terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis as well as 16S rRNA gene clone libraries we investigated variations occurring in biofilm bacterial and ciliate protozoan communities. Initial experiments conducted in flow chamber microcosms showed that significant differences in microbial community structure could be detected within only a few days of exposure to common water contaminants and remained detectable weeks after transfer to uncontaminated water. Further research investigating biofilm of more than 60 stream sites variously impacted by urbanization revealed a strong separation between rural and urban streams and confirmed the potential use of stream biofilm as a bio-indicator of stream health. Environmental monitoring techniques developed in this project were then successfully tested to investigate the efficacy of an enclosed stormwater treatment system, where traditional biological indicators such as macro-benthic invertebrates were not available. We are now extending our research to 300 different streams in order to define a general Bacterial Community Index characterising stream ecosystem health based on the structure of biofilm bacterial communities.

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  • A Variant of Adaptive Mean Shift-Based Clustering

    Li, Fajie; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: ICONIP 2008 - 15th International Conference on Neural Information. Processing of the Asia-Pacific Neural Network Assembly November 25-28, 2008, Auckland, New Zealand We are interested in clustering sets of highly overlapping clusters. For example, given is an observed set of stars (considered to be a set of points); how to find (recover) clusters which are the contributing galaxies of the observed union of those clusters? Below we propose a modification of an adaptive mean shift-based clustering algorithm (called Algorithm 1) proposed in 2003 by B. Geogescu, I. Shimsoni and P. Meer

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  • Impact of PCV7 on antibiotic susceptibiity of nasophayngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae in South Auckland children

    Sekikawa, E; Trenholme, A; Taylor, S; Lennon, Diana; McBride, C; Best, Emma (2011-03-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cell proliferative and radioprotective properties of bioactive Salvia sclareoides extracts

    Ruivo, D; Oliveira, Maria; Rauter, AP; Justino, J; Goulart, M (2008-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Mid-term results after phaco-canaloplasty and canaloplasty

    Hurtikova, KH; Traine, PT; Loertscher, Martin; Mueller, MM (2015-06-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cardiac response to weak electrical shocks challenges the functional syncytium paradigm

    Caldwell, Bryan; Trew, Mark; Pertsov, AM (2015-04-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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