179 results for The University of Auckland Library, Creative work

  • Concerto Auckland; Kufferath, Irons, Salzmann trio

    Irons, D; Kufferath, E; Salzmann, Edith

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Piano trio evening with works by Haydn and Brahms Joseph Haydn, Trio G Major Hob. XV. Elliott Carter, Mnemosyne for violin & Figment IV for viola. Maurice Ravel, Sonata for violin and piano No.2 in G Major. Johannes Brahms, Trio in B Major op.8.

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  • Fashion and Fibres; Island dress in Polynesia

    Forgan, S (2015-12-03)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lythberg, B., catalogue author

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  • Doggerel for bass flute

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve (2015-11)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Eve de Castro-Robinson: composer

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  • Releasing the Angel for cello and orchestra [For David Chickering]

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve (2005)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    a 15 minute work for cello and orchestra. Premiered in Hamilton then performed in Auckland and Wellington. Recorded and broadcast by Concert FM.

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  • Chaos of Delight III for womens voices [To Karen Grylls]

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve (1998)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Recorded NZ Choral Music CD SLD 108 Kiwi-Pacific Auckland University Singers conducted by Karen Grylls

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  • Tuku Iho, Legado vivo M??ori???NZMACI exhibition in South America

    NZMACI (2015-12-03)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lythberg, B., catalogue author

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  • Te Mahou: Ko Te Matatini

    NZMACI (2015-12-03)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lythberg, B. author of catalogue

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  • Tauhi V??: the art of socio-spatial relations???Legacies of 18th century Tongan arts

    Afu, S; Edwards, T; Fonua, L; Gillies, TE; Burrows, SF; Havea, T; Kaloni, Tomui; Mafile'o, E; Mafile'o, V; Ofamo'oni, M; Toetu'u, '; Work, B; Mahina, O; Potauaine, S

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lythberg, B., exhibition curator, catalogue author and editor Tauhi V?? is the latest group exhibtion of Auckland-based Tongan Artists??? collective No???o Fakataha. It explores the ways they and invited guests ??? tend relationships with people, and through art, across time and space. The resulting works, many of which feature decorated barkcloth (ngatu), give material form to socio-spatial relations.

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  • Andrea Zani: Complete cello concertos

    Rummel, Martin

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Martin Rummel (cello soloist), K??lner Akademie (orchestra), Michael Alexander Willens (conductor) This recording was awarded the "Pizzicato Supersonic Award", the "American Record Guide Critics Choice" award and was listed on the Fanfare "Want List" as well as nominated for an ICMA award.

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  • Gidon Bing???s modernist milieu

    Bing, G (2015-12-03)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lythberg, B., catalogue author

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  • The Light Horizon

    Jenkinson, Megan

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Light Horizon exhibition draws on photographs taken during my two weeks on the Ice as an Antarctic Artist’s Fellow, Dec. 2005. The show was significant for its scale and scope – 40 digital photo collage works, and lenticular prints, from eight different series. It represents the culmination of my most significant research outputs from the ‘Antarctica’ project to date and included works selected from the exhibitions The Dark Continent, Jonathan Smart Gallery, Christchurch, Jun-July 2007, and The Weight of Water, Mark Hutchins Gallery, Wellington, Sept 2007. This exhibition occupied both the downstairs and upstairs galleries at Two Rooms, one of New Zealand’s leading galleries. [583] Commentary: This research acknowledges Antarctica as a complex site that cannot be summed up in one particular artistic approach. The images I produced represent a major departure from my previous photographic practice and constitute a range of approaches differing considerably from the majority of photography undertaken on the Continent. In my work landscape was the starting point for a series of meditations on Antarctica’s heroic age of exploration, Antarctica as a place of speculation and wonder, a site of scientific study and more recently commercial speculation. Digital montage enabled me to overlay past and present, the scientific and cultural, while the visual trickery of the lenticular process (first used in The Dark Continent, 2007) provided further conceptual shifts, emphasizing the uncertainty and instability of the landscapes in view. Virginia Were in Volatile Imaginings, Art News New Zealand, Winter 2008, wrote: “Megan Jenkinson’s visit to Antarctica has spawned an extraordinary series of photographs, which present a post-romantic view of our engagement with nature’… ‘[her work is] like an extended love poem to a place she found both confounding and inspiring’… ‘Jenkinson’s photographic montages are brilliant evocations of these atmospheric phenomena [auroras and mirages], visual tricks from the imagination of this acclaimed artist’. Reviewed in The NZ Herald and 5 works collected by Te Papa Tongarewa. [1,214] • Part of the Auckland Festival of Photography, 2008, receiving additional public exposure as a result. • Five Works collected by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington. • Volatile Imaginings’, Artist’s Profile, Art News, New Zealand, Winter, 2008, pages 72 – 75. • Adam Gifford, ‘Changing View of a Frozen Land,’ review, in the New Zealand Herald, illustrated, 20.5.09 • Sharu Delilkan, ‘Trick of the Light,’ review in The Aucklander, illustrated, 7.5.08 • Gallery Talk on the exhibition, Two Rooms (in connection with the 2008 Auckland Festival of Photography), 11.6.08 • Gallery talk to members of the Paradise Art Group. • The exhibition was advertised in the following: Art News, New Zealand, Winter 2008 (full page colour advertisement); Art Zone April/June 2008 (full page); and the Auckland Readers and Writers Festival ’08 booklet (1/3 page). • “I was horrified by the Brilliance of your work. My jaw dropped open as I tried to comprehend how you achieved it all.” (Email from Greta Anderson, ex student and tutor at Elam).

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  • REVOLVE An interactive performance

    Brown, Carol; Niemetz, A; Gander, P; Medlin, M; Scoones, R

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Co-conceived by Carol Brown and Anne Niemetz; dancing, choreography, spoken text and performance elements authored by Carol Brown; Anne Niemetz designed the wearable technology, interface system and filmed and edited the video compoent; Russell Scoones developed the recorded soundscape; Philippa Gander contributed expertise as a sleep scientist and co-researcher in the developmental stages of the project dramaturgy; Margie Medlin was responsible for the overall lighting design and related performance elements; additional contributors included Fiona Graham and Alys Longley who contributed to the development of the performance texts. REVOLVE is a real-time interactive performance that sheds light on the ‘stuff’ dreams are made of, the night-stories and bodily states that shape our sleeping hours. As an arts-science collaboration, the research imperative was to translate the data of a sleep scientist into sonic and choreographic content through wearable technologies. The work invites audiences to experience a series of states enfolding voice, sound, light, video and dance, as she metaphorically traces the path of the sleeper’s mind and body from dusk to dawn. Driven by a curiosity about the body, its rhythms and potential for change, the work alludes to the planetary, physiological and personal cycles that round our lives. In doing so, it explores how the non-literalness of scientific phenomena (data from EEG readings of brain waves) can be mapped through interactive performance and made meaningful as a series of performative states for audiences. The performance ecology enfolds wearable electronic sensor technology, video, lighting, text, recorded sound and an interactive sound environment within a choreographic score. Sensing the body, its gestures and its environment through the measurement of light, tilt and acceleration, Carol Brown wears a “sensor suit” that allows her to intuitively control and interact with a malleable sound environment. She can respond to this environment by choosing to expose or hide light-sensitive parts of her body and combining these actions with movements of varied speed. In turn, the sonic feedback influences the emerging choreographic score, inducing constraints and generative cyclic patterns for movement. The dramaturgy is driven by concepts based on the physiological cycles that underlie sleeping and waking, which are in turn shaped by our circadian biological clock that keeps our sleep/wake cycle coordinated with the rotation of the earth. REVOLVE includes scenes that are inspired by states such as light sleep – delving in and out of wakefulness; deep sleep – a state in which the brain’s neuronal activity synchs up to create very slow and large brainwaves; and REM sleep – a state characterised by nervous muscle twitches and rapid eye movements that come from an active, but sleeping brain. At the end of the performance there is a metaphorical breech into waking consciousness as the brain re-engages with the external world through purposeful and directed movement. The sound design is partially composed, and partially interactive. The composed sounds are sourced from EEG brainwaves, recordings of a sleeping child and the voice of tenor Keith Lewis. The interactive sounds are based on the auditory beat, a phenomenon that arises when two pure tones of different, but neighbouring frequencies are played together. In such a situation, a beat frequency emerges, perceived as a periodic pulsing of the sound. These beats – waves of sound - are powerful to listen to, physically moving, subsonic but clearly perceivable.

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  • Polymer Monoliths

    Robinson, Peter

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    New Zealand artist Peter Robinson was last seen at the IMA in 2005, exhibiting alongside Gordon Bennett in the exhibition Three Colours. There he offered his sceptical take on post-colonial art-and-identity politics. His recent work, however, leaves such issues behind, in what seems like an abruptly formalist about-face. He has moved away from illustrating political, scientific, and philosophical ideas, and toward playing with materials and exploring the resulting poetic nuances. He's been working with polystyrene—that mundane, everyday material of consumer excess. A non-biodegradable thermo-plastic, it cushions our electronic goods in transit and pollutes our foreshores. In Robinson's work, it is also a sculptural material of infinite possibility—lightweight yet massive, able to fill large spaces yet also to articulate delicate forms. Robinson pursues multiple lines of inquiry, as if, given polystyrene's association with disposability, any number of sculptural experiments could be explored, cast aside, and reworked. His work ranges from roughly hewn, lumpen forms to intricately carved, baroque ones. In our show, Robinson continues his recent exploration of the monolith. In conjunction with Artspace, Sydney; supported by Creative New Zealand, University of Auckland, and Brisbane's Urban Art Projects.

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  • North German Organ Music [CD recording]

    Tibbles, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Recording on Ahrend Organ, Monash University, Melbourne

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  • Haydn. Trios for Flute, Cello and Piano Hob. XV:15-17 (M Rummel, cello) [CD recording]

    Rummel, Martin

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Uwe Grodd, flute (soloist) ; Martin Rummel, cello (soloist) ;Christopher Hinterhuber, piano (soloist) CD recording of Haydn, Flute Trios Hob XV;15-17. Digital distribution started in May 2011, physical release October 2011

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  • Cirrus

    Matthews, Stephen (2007)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    My role in the creation of this work was as the composer as well as the provision of complete parts to the NZSO including the addition of the final string bowings The title Cirrus is taken from the first stanza of James K. Baxter’s poem, High Country Weather (1948). Alone we are born And die alone Yet see the red-gold cirrus Over snow mountain shine Upon the upland road Ride easy stranger Surrender to the sky Your heart of anger What appealed was the depiction of individual endeavour, the expansive backdrop of New Zealand rural imagery and the poem’s final plea. Despite the foreboding beginning, metaphorically the ‘red-gold cirrus’ foretells of a change for the better. Cirrus are beautiful high transparent clouds typically streaming in the direction of the wind, usually signalling the arrival of fair weather. The opening of the piece employs high-pitched bell-like chords. While the upper and lower strings hold a sustained note, a bass clarinet introduces the first significant melodic theme. After the first full-orchestral climax the texture of the climax quickly dissipates to reveal a high-pitched modal melody. The brass abruptly interrupts this moment of quiet with an augmentation of the previous theme. After this interruption subsides the character of the music gradually becomes more uplifting and confident. Then solo instruments perform themes over a lively syncopated chromatic pizzicato bass line and variations of the original theme repeat, driving the music forward to reach the final climax. The piece ends with a final recapitulation of the high modal melody and arpeggiated echoes of the opening bell-like chords in the tuned percussion.

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  • Five past five at the Clock Tower: Exploring artistic spaces of the University

    Locke, Kirsten

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This presentation in the form of a concert explores the aesthetic potential of the University of Auckland Clock Tower. Built in the early 20th Century architectural style of art nouveau during the 1920s, the Clock Tower was originally part of the university Arts Centre that officially opened in 1926. Now an administrative hub for staff and students, this concert reclaims the artistic intentions of the space through an a Capella choral performance that explores the notions of temporality and artistry through music. The concert draws on the enduring power of the Clock Tower as the literal heartbeat of the university, the timekeeper, and symbolic nexus of academia, creativity, and cultural power. Consisting of eleven singers drawn from staff at the university, alumni, and keen enthusiasts, we invite you to explore the intersection and artistic transformation of space, place and time at the university with us at Five Past Five at the Clock Tower.

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  • Muddy Urbanism: an LA dialogue

    Waghorn, Kathy; Haringa, H; Jones, R; Khoo, Chia Venn; Seung Kim, Sophia; Lapwood, A; Shake Lee, Z; Lin, S; Paget, V; Ryan, H; Yoo, A; Mecredy, E

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    A piece of collective urban research on the Whau River, Auckland MUDDY URBANISM www.muddyurbanismlab.wordpress.com Auckland, the largest city in New Zealand, has a unique geography, with an extensive coastline abutting urban areas. While architects, planners and politicians often discuss the importance of ‛the waterfront’, the view of this watery edge is frequently restricted to the inner city and the exclusive beach suburbs. However Auckland ‛fronts’ the water in many different ways and spaces, most of which are ignored in an urban sense. One such space is the Whau River estuary. The Whau River bisects the inner west of Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland. Its path creates a portage, connecting two harbours, permitting the movement with waka (canoe) between the east and west coasts. This portage has seen over one thousand years of occupation and use. Pre-colonisation, the Whau was one of the main active frameworks of social connection and economic production and in the colonial economy it played a crucial role in the settlement and urbanisation of Auckland’s west, as both a transport route for food and as a source of clay. In latter decades however, the Whau has lost its importance. No longer a transport route, and for much of the recent past a boundary between municipalities, it has increasingly become the site of multiple conflicts across jurisdictional, economic, land use and natural systems. Muddy Urbanism is a special urban-research workshop at The School of Architecture and Planning (The University of Auckland) that engages in the critical mapping of the Whau in order to visualise the many conflicts that have been hidden from institutional thinking and to propose new interfaces between urban policy, ecological systems and community participation for the regeneration of this catchment. This research project amplifies the local as a critical site of intervention for rethinking existing land use, public and environmental infrastructure, and neighbourhood-based socio-economic development, in order to re-imagine a productive coastline for the many different waterfronts of Auckland.

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  • Flotilla Whau, a work as part of the Rosebank Art Walk, Auckland Arts Festival

    Patel, N; Waghorn, Kathy; Bush, R

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Development of one day participatory event / socially engaged art work for the Rosebank Artwalk, curated by Marcus Williams as part of the Auckland Arts Festival. Commissioned as part of the Rosebank Art Walk (Auckland Arts Festival 2013) the Flotilla Whau was intended as a one-day event where a collection of water-craft traversed a marked course on the Whau river in Auckland, new Zealand. Situated as both art work and community development event, the flotilla brought river users together, stimulating connection and ongoing discussion. The intention of the flotilla was to mark out this marginal estuarine space, in some way drawing attention to it, and in so doing re-establishing the river as a visible,material space that can be occupied, a place one can be in and on. The Flotilla was repeated in 2014 as a stand alone event, with the number of participants increasing from 50 to 300. As a result of the success of these two events the Flotilla Whau was offered funding from Auckland Council for 2015, which allowed for the event to grow the performative spatial and visual components. The 2015 Flotilla Whau took place on Sunday February 8 in collaboration with the Voyager, New Zealand Maritime Museum.

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  • Muddy Urbanism: a project for The Lab at "If you were to live here . . " the 5th Auckland Triennial

    Waghorn, Kathy; Cruz, T; Patel, N; Mecredy, Esther

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    research and curation International curator of the 5th Auckland Triennial Hou Hanru described The Lab as the Triennial’s “intellectual core ( . . .) functioning like a machine of knowledge (. . . ) a kind of brain for the whole project”. The Lab was a joint project of the architecture and spatial design faculties of The University of Auckland, AUT, and UNITEC. Working under the Triennial title “If You Were To Live Here . . . ” the Lab’s role was to act as a catalyst for the critical examination of urban life in Auckland and New Zealand. The Lab physically took form in the Chartwell Gallery at Auckland Art Gallery. The Muddy Urbanism Lab was developed by Kathy Waghorn (University of Auckland) with Triennial and Auckland University guest Teddy Cruz, Professor in Public Culture and Urbanism in the Visual Arts Department at University of California, San Diego, and co-founder of the Center for Urban Ecologies. Working with post-graduate architecture students from the University the research focussed on the Whau River, a tidal waterway bisecting the inner west of Auckland, creating a portage that connects the Waitemat? and Manukau harbours. Pre-colonisation, the Whau was one of the main active frameworks of social connection and economic production along the coastlines of T?maki Makaurau. In the colonial economy it played a crucial role in the settlement and urbanisation of Auckland’s west, as both a transport route and as a source of clay. No longer a transport route, and for much of the recent past a boundary between municipalities, it has increasingly become the site of multiple conflicts across jurisdictional, economic, land use and natural systems. Muddy Urbanism engaged in the critical mapping of the Whau in order to visualise the many conflicts that have been hidden from institutional thinking and to propose new interfaces between urban policy, ecological systems and community participation for the regeneration of this catchment that may be applied across Auckland. The research was presented in large scale prints, models and projections and the Lab became the venue for an associated public programme.

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