14,758 results for The University of Auckland Library, Journal article

  • Mortality and hospitalisation costs of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in New Zealand.

    Milne, Richard; Lennon, Diana; Stewart, Joanna; Vander Hoorn, S; Scuffham, PA (2012-08)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aims:  To estimate the annual mortality and the cost of hospital admissions for acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) for New Zealand residents. Methods:  Hospital admissions in 2000-2009 with a principal diagnosis of ARF or RHD (ICD9_AM 390-398; ICD10-AM I00-I099) and deaths in 2000-2007 with RHD as the underlying cause were obtained from routine statistics. The cost of each admission was estimated by multiplying its diagnosis-related group (DRG) cost weight by the national price for financial year 2009/2010. Results:  There were on average 159 RHD deaths each year with a mean annual mortality rate of 4.4 per 100 000 (95% confidence limit 4.2, 4.7). Age-adjusted mortality was five- to 10-fold higher for Māori and Pacific peoples than for non-Māori/Pacific. The mean age at RHD death (male/female) was 56.4/58.4 for Māori, 50.9/59.8 for Pacific and 78.2/80.6 for non-Māori, non-Pacific men and women. The average annual DRG-based cost of hospital admissions in 2000-2009 for ARF and RHD across all age groups was $12.0 million (95% confidence limit $11.1 million, $12.8 million). Heart valve surgery accounted for 28% of admissions and 71% of the cost. For children 5-14 years of age, valve surgery accounted for 7% of admissions and 27% of the cost. Two-thirds of the cost occurs after the age of 30. Conclusions:  ARF and RHD comprise a burden of mortality and hospital cost concentrated largely in middle age. Māori and Pacific RHD mortality rates are substantially higher than those of non-Māori/Pacific.

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  • Use of laser capture microdissection for analysis of retinal mRNA/miRNA expression and DNA methylation

    Hackler, L; Masuda, T; Oliver, Verity; Merbs, SL; Zack, DJ (2012)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a useful method to isolate specific cells or cell layers of interest from heterogeneous tissues, such as the retina. The collected cells can be used for DNA, RNA, or protein analysis. We have applied LCM technology to isolate cells from the outer nuclear, inner nuclear, and ganglion cell layers of the retina for mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression and epigenetic (DNA methylation) analysis. Here, we describe the methods we have employed for sample preparation, LCM-based isolation of retinal layers, RNA/DNA extraction, RNA quality check, microRNA analysis by quantitative PCR, and DNA methylation analysis by bisulfite sequencing.

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  • Counsellors as witnesses in Court

    Agee, M; Feather, R (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Review of the book The new academic: A strategic handbook, by Shelda Debowski

    Sturm, Sean (2015)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Assessing the dimensionality of computer self-efficacy among pre-service teachers in Singapore: A structural equation modeling approach

    Teo, Timothy; Koh, JHL (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study examines the computer self-efficacy among pre-service teachers (N=708) at a teacher training institute in Singapore. Data were collected through self-reported ratings on a 7-point Likert-type scale. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed on an initial sample (N=354) and the result revealed that pre-service teachers' computer self-efficacy was explained by three factors: Basic Computer Skills (BCS), Media-Related Skills (MRS), and Web-Based Skills (WBS). Using a separate sample (N=354), a confirmatory factor analysis was performed and this supported the three-factor structure from the initial EFA. A comparison of alternative models revealed that the correlated three-factor and second-order (three -factor) models had the best fits; and were adequate representations of pre-service teachers' computer self-efficacy. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

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  • Explaining the intention to use technology among volitional users in education: An evaluation of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) using structural equation modeling

    Teo, Timothy (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study investigated a sample (N=157) of pre-service teachers' intention to use technology, using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) as a research framework. In this study, pre-service teachers were used to represent volitional users of technology. This study contributes to the growing studies on TAM by demonstrating that perceived usefulness (PU), perceived ease of use (PEU) and attitude toward computer use (ATCU) to be significant determinants of the intention to use (ITU). Using the structural equation modelling approach, there was a good model fit for both the measurement and structural models. All four hypotheses were supported. Overall, the results of this study offer some evidence that the TAM is an effective model to explain pre-service teachers' intention to use technology.

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  • Evaluating the intention to use technology among trainee teachers using the Technology Acceptance Model: A structural equation modeling approach

    Teo, Timothy (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study examined student teachers' self-reported intentions to use technology. One hundred and fifty-nine participants completed a survey questionnaire measuring their responses to four constructs derived from the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). Using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM), a path analysis was conducted to analyze the data. The results of this study showed that the TAM is a valid model in explaining student teachers' intention to use technology. Overall, this study indicated that attitude towards computer use had the largest effect on the intention to use technology, followed by perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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  • The influence of user characteristics on technology acceptance by teachers: A literature review

    Teo, Timothy (2006)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Advances in computer technology and the diffusion of personal computers, coupled with the associated hardware, software, and network resources, motivated the development and implementation of new and innovative teaching strategies. Today it is accepted that technology plays an important and integral role in the teaching and learning process to effectively prepare students to face multiple challenges in the 21st century workplace. Within this framework, the role of the teacher is an important one as most of the students' activities in the schools are managed by the teacher. Thus it is essential to understand the factors that influence teachers' acceptance of technology for use in the classroom. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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  • Assessing the cross-cultural validity study of the E-learning Acceptance Measure (ElAM): A structural equation modeling approach

    Teo, Timothy (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study is a cross-cultural validation of the E-learning Acceptance Measure (ElAM) (Teo, 2010). E-learning acceptance was defined as the extent to which users would use elearning for the purposes it was designed for. A sample of 377 university students from three public universities in Thailand participated in this study. Using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, the results revealed that the original 3-factor ElAM was not supported. However, the data in this study supported a correlated two-factor model (Tutor Quality and Facilitating Conditions) although an acceptable model fit to the data was not found. Despite significant parameter estimates for all 21 items, there were a high number of correlated measurement errors among these items, suggesting the possibility of unexplained shared variances among the items and unmodeled factors. This study concludes with suggestions for further cross-cultural validation studies

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  • Influence of user characteristics on teachers’ intention to use technology: Some research evidence

    Teo, Timothy (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Advances in computer technology and the diffusion of personal computers, coupled with the associated hardware and software, and network resources, motivated the development and implementation of new and innovative teaching strategies. Today, it is accepted that technology plays an important and integral role in the instructional process in order to effectively prepare students to face multiple challenges in the 21st century workplace. Within this framework, the role of the teacher is an important one as most of the students' activities in the schools are managed by the teacher. These include how and when technology is used by the teacher and students. Given the high stakes, it is essential to understand the factors that drive teachers' intention to use technology for teaching and learning.

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  • Cannabinoid receptor 2 undergoes Rab5-mediated internalization and recycles via a Rab11-dependent pathway.

    Grimsey, NL; Goodfellow, CE; Dragunow, M; Glass, M (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) is a GPCR highly expressed on the surface of cells of the immune system, supporting its role in immunomodulation. This study has investigated the trafficking properties of this receptor when stably expressed by HEK-293 cells. As previously reported, cell surface CB2 rapidly internalized upon exposure to agonist. Direct evidence of CB2 recycling was observed upon competitive removal of the stimulating agonist by inverse agonist. CB2 also underwent slow constitutive internalization when agonist was absent and was up-regulated in the presence of inverse agonist. Co-expression of CB2 and dominant negative Rab5 resulted in a significantly reduced capacity for receptors to internalize with no effect on recycling of the internalized receptors. Conversely, co-expression with dominant negative Rab11 did not alter the ability of CB2 to internalize but did impair their ability to return to the cell surface. Co-expression of wild-type, dominant negative or constitutively active Rab4 with CB2 did not alter basal surface expression, extent of internalization, or extent of recycling. These results suggest that Rab5 is involved in CB2 endocytosis and that internalized receptors are recycled via a Rab11 associated pathway rather than the rapid Rab4 associated pathway. This report provides the first comprehensive description of CB2 internalization and recycling to date.

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  • An integrated framework for designing Computer Learning Environments (CLEs)

    Wang, YQ; Teo, Timothy; Woo, HL (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Web-based constructivist learning environments (CLEs) have many merits over the traditional classroom setting. However, few practice guidelines are currently available to guide the design of an effective web-based CLE. This article presents a three-layer integrated framework, which includes foundational tenets of constructivism and information and communication technology (ICT) at the central layer, element design and interaction design at the middle layer, and product specifications at the outermost layer. This framework illustrates clearly how detailed specifications of a CLE are eventually developed based on the basic beliefs of constructivism, by following the design guidelines suggested by element design and interaction design.

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  • The role of self-questioning: Problem solving in a security organisation

    Ng, KH; Lee, CB; Teo, T (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Self-questioning plays an important role in problem solving. In this study, we examined the effects of self-questioning techniques on problem solving and metacognition for ill-structured workplace problems including counter-terrorism, which is unconventional. The independent variable was the strategy training in self-questioning techniques, structuring around the IDEAL model as a cognitive heuristics adaptation to resolve novel situations. The dependent variable metacognition was made up of two constructs i.e. knowledge about cognition and regulation of cognition. These were measured by using the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI) while overall problem solving performance was determined by assessing the participants' reasoning and the resulting consequences of their decision (outcome performance) in the pre- and post-tests. Our results revealed that the intervention had significant positive effects on the novices' reasoning performance, outcome performance and overall problem solving performance. In addition, the level of correlation between reasoning performance and outcome performance was significantly positive.

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  • Using structural equation modeling (SEM) in educational research: Practices and Issues

    Teo, Timothy (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) is a method for analyzing multivariate data from both nonexperimental and experimental research. This method combines a measurement model linking observed variables with latent variables and a structural model linking latent variables. The use of SEM in social science and educational research has grown since the early days in 1980s and offers promise as a method that is useful in theory-based research. Using a data set for analysis, this paper presents a step-by-step, non-technical introduction on how the SEM technique is used. Throughout the paper, practical suggestions are given in order that researchers could use the SEM technique quickly. The paper concludes with information on relevant internet resources for further study and research. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

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  • Pianism Retraining via Video Conferencing as a Means of Assisting Recovery from Focal Dystonia

    de Lisle, Rae; Speedy, DB; Thompson, John MD (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Focal dystonia (FD) is a devastating neurological condition which causes involuntary muscle contractions and often results in the loss of a musician's playing ability. Our study investigated whether retraining via video conferencing could be helpful in the treatment of a professional pianist with a 5-year history of FD. Although full recovery was not seen, improvement was observed at slow tempi, and his hand was visibly less cramped as training sessions progressed. We conclude that video conferencing could be an acceptable medium to assist pianism retraining in pianists with FD when location prevents on-site retraining. However, in this study it did not seem as effective as previously reported, similar, one-on-one retraining in the same location.

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  • Invasive meningococcal disease in Northland, New Zealand

    Mills, Clair (2011-12)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Invasive meningococcal disease is a serious illness commonly presenting as a meningitis and/or septicaemia. The case fatality rate in New Zealand over the last decade has varied from 4 to 10%, with higher rates for group C disease.

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  • Realising potential and recognising paradox: The national induction and mentoring project

    Langdon, Frances; Lind, P; Shaw, C; Pilcher, E (2010-12)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although comprehensive policy and resourcing of beginning teacher induction and mentoring can improve teacher retention and quality, there is growing recognition that combining on-site leadership and policy is integral to providing effective learning for teachers. This has led to an increased interest in melding policy and resources with school and service leadership to promote consistency of beginning teachers’ induction and mentoring experiences. This article describes and provides insights into a project involving four pilots which are trialling the draft national guidelines for effective induction programmes and mentor teacher development. An external evaluation across the four pilots has revealed that national guidelines can be a positive lever for effecting change in induction and mentoring practices. Implementing such change nationally will require leaders to take seriously an educative, transformative approach to learning for both beginning teachers and their mentors.

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  • Organisational learning facilitated by the use of student achievement information

    Millward, Pamela; Timperley, Helen (2007)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper describes the changes that occurred at one school, resulting in dramatically improved student achievement in reading. Factors beyond a school's control such as ethnicity and poverty have been cited as risk factors associated with students' academic underachievement (Harker, 2003; Nash, 1982; 1993; 2002; 2003). Despite unchanged external risk factors one school, referred to as Chestbrook School, changed risk factors it did have control over to facilitate reading achievement at age appropriate levels, for most of its students.

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  • Secondary teachers', student teachers' and education students' attitudes to full-year acceleration for gifted students.

    Wardman, Janice (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    There is much research evidence in support of the academic benefits of acceleration, and while there is some evidence of the social and emotional benefits, the quantitative data are not as robust in this area. The use of acceleration for gifted students, however, is not common, and an analysis of the literature suggests that it is the perceptions of teachers, rather than the evidence of the results of published studies, which have caused the hesitation to utilise acceleration as a strategy for gifted students. This study sought to identify various groups of secondary teachers' perceptions towards full year academic acceleration. The findings confirm that the strategy is rarely used in NZ, although there was a high level of willingness on the part of teachers to utilise it in future provision for gifted students. [Author abstract, ed]

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  • How to get along with Others: children exploring issues of racial-ethnic identity in multicultural and multiethnic communities through drama.

    Fitzpatrick, Esther (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper explores the use of drama as an interdisciplinary methodology to understand the construction of a positive racial-ethnic identity in response to the criticisms and concerns of Multiculturalism as a practice. It draws on a recent study where the focus was on the stories of children who represented a hegemonic white population in one primary classroom in New Zealand.

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