16,204 results for The University of Auckland Library, 2010

  • Evaluation of utilisation of the Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV Programme in Central province, Kenya

    Ngugi, Catherine Njeri (2013)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: The PMTCT HIV programme has been one of the most successful HIV preventive interventions towards HIV-free future generations. However, even though the programme is virtually effective in developed countries, many developing countries are reporting child HIV infections due to the MTCT. The programme has existed in Kenya for more than a decade, yet in 2011, 12,894children were HIV infected due to MTCT Objective: To evaluate the PMTCT programme, especially the HIV testing from the antenatal period to the postnatal period among expectant parents attending Nyeri Provincial General Hospital in Central Province, Kenya. Design: Retrospective analysis of the hospital registers. Methods: Three hospital registers were analysed for the period from July 2009 to September 2012. The registers were for antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal care respectively. Each register documented the utilisation of PMTCT services by the expectant parents. Descriptive and inferential statistics were produced to analyse data from the registers. Results: The PMTCT services utilisation was sub-optimal. Of the 504 expectant mothers who attended the antenatal clinic, 59.9% came once, 80.4% had their first visit in the third trimester (between weeks 28 and 40) and only 6.9% were accompanied by their partners. All the women were HIV tested in their first visit but only 12.1% were rescreened after three months, and only 3.8% had been tested prior to the current pregnancy (p=0.000). No expectant mother was tested for HIV intrapartum or postpartum. The children of the 504 mothers who were HIV tested were those whose parent/s were known to be HIV positive or who had presented to a child welfare clinic with recurring symptoms suggestive of a failing immune system. Conclusion: Public health programs need to strengthen the PMTCT and HIV prevention programmes to ensure that HIV testing preconception and in pregnancy is fully implemented and strengthened, alongside continued education of the public through community programmes and the media. To avert further horizontal and vertical transmission of HIV, there is a need to address urgently the identified missed opportunities in the PMTCT program. These programmatic challenges require health system redesign and strengthening, resource allocation, addressing research gaps and reassessing the current PMTCT policies.

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  • Student self-assessment

    Brown, Gavin; Harris, LR (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Creative Printmaking in New Zealand, 1930-2007: An Annotated Bibliography

    Ward, Fiona (2012)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    This Annotated Bibliography includes 105 references that record all available published, unpublished and digital material about the history of creative printmaking in New Zealand from 1930 to 2007. As New Zealand academics and printmakers have noted, while other visual media such as painting and photography have always been included in the discourse of art history in New Zealand, for various reasons printmaking has been gradually excluded and marginalised. There is a need to foster an academic and critical interest in printmaking to provide a framework to enable further research and scholarship. This Annotated Bibliography will support future academic and critical explorations of the topic.

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  • Indigenous Visions For Sustainable Development Law? Continuing the Conversation

    Watene, Krushil (2013-08-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Language, Religion, and Nationalism: The Case of the Former Serbo-Croatian

    Greenberg, Robert (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Chinese Old and Rare Books at the University of Auckland

    Lin, HQ; Downing, Jian (2014)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Comment on: Cross-border portfolios: assets, liabilities and wealth transfers

    Berka, Martin (2015-10)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Storm over the Starship: A geosemiotic analysis of brand co-ownership

    Conroy, DM; Brookes, R (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Demystifying the Mosuo: The behavioral ecology of kinship and reproduction of China's "last matriarchal" society

    Mattison, Siobhan (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Virtually every human endeavor is accomplished with some form of assistance from kin. From subsistence activities to child rearing to the provision of emotional support, relatives are called on to aid their kin. Yet while the importance of families to individuals arguably is universal, family systems are extremely variable in terms of their composition, the services they provide, and how services are organized and allocated. This dissertation examines the factors underlying variation in kinship systems in a population of agropastoralists currently undergoing economic and cultural transition: the ethnic Mosuo of Southwest China. Through the lens of behavioral ecology, it views kinship systems as dynamic, responding flexibly and adaptively to changes in social, cultural and ecological circumstances. The first chapter introduces the basic questions that this dissertation aims to address, the context surrounding my interests in the Mosuo, and basic descriptions of the field site and methodology. The second chapter tests a recent behavioral ecological model of matrilineal inheritance, asking whether Mosuo inheritance varies predictably according to source of wealth. It explains a hypothesized link between matriliny and resource paucity, and provides the first independent evidence in support of the behavioral ecology model under test. In the third chapter, I explore the impacts of economic differences on Mosuo reproduction and kinship, showing that wealth is associated with higher levels of marital commitment, as evidenced by increased stability in reproductive partnerships, and other departures from stated matrilineal norms. The fourth chapter examines the impacts of wealth and residential ecology on paternal investment in children, arguing that in contrast to previous assertions, fathers are important among the Mosuo, and that fathers’ levels of investment in child rearing varies according to the resources they have to provide and local availability of reproductive partners. The fifth and final chapter of my dissertation summarizes the evidence presented in previous chapters and suggests specific avenues for future research. I conclude by emphasizing the power of behavioral ecology to understand the ultimate foundations of kinship.

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  • HD Sheep Model (A-2476) Project Report October 2011

    Reid, Susanne; Bawden, S (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This Interim review provides a summary of the work that has been undertaken by researchers from SARDI and University of Auckland on the HD Sheep Biomolecular project over the 6 month period from 1st April 2011-30th September 2011. This report does not include data that was incorporated in the previous report unless noted. The aim of this work is to further characterize the ovine model of Huntington's disease (HD) in order to gain a better understanding of disease progression, and to establish it as a therapeutic testing system. Our objective was to develop a model that will recapitulate the progressive, late-onset characteristics of the disease expressing the full-length huntingtin protein with a moderate (in model terms) CAG repeat size. Although not yet conclusive, we have good evidence that the model will fulfill our initial objectives. Support from the CHDI since October 2009 (A-2476) has enabled the characterization and flock expansion of the sheep transgenic model, identification of the transgenic line "Kiwi" as the favored line for future analysis, establishment of tissue collection protocols and molecular/pathological methodologies for monitoring "disease" progression in the model. A limited breeding program has been initiated from two Taffy line animals that exhibit higher mRNA expression than other Taffy animals, along with detectable transgene protein in skin biopsy. Unlike the Kiwi line, we now know Taffy has multiple integration sites, explaining the variable levels of expression seen. This additional breeding will establish if a viable additional line can be generated, showing adequate and stable transmission. The Kiwi line demonstrates reliable and stable expression of the transgene and repeat. MGH capture sequencing has identified the Kiwi transgene insertion site is at a single locus in an intragenic region. Analysis of harvested brain tissues as the animal's age will demonstrate the extent to which the human disease is being recapitulated. The oldest transgenic sheep have been preserved as a result of SOC discussions, given the intrinsic value of their age with respect to observations of disease progression. A SOC decision was also made to delay the harvest of 18 month animals until 2 years, primarily based on the observation of a small number of inclusions seen in 2 of the 3 18 month animals. The decision to delay sacrifice was to allow phenotype advancement. Therefore the only animals harvested and assessed for a molecular phenotype within the time frame of this contract are 6 months old, with the next harvest scheduled for March 2012 (2 year old animals).

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  • A methodology for multilevel analysis of scientific collaboration networks : Mapping current computer science research in New Zealand

    Martin, Bernd (2014-05-01)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This research scientifically analysed the evolving Complex Network structures of the New Zealand Computer Science research community upon multiple levels (Macro, Meso, Micro, Topics). Methodological approaches utilised interdisciplinary techniques comprised of data mining, social network analyses, scientometrics and data visualisation. The research sought to identify communities, highly influential nodes, research institutions, and their collaborative patterns over the last 5 years. Network metrics revealed insights into the structure of the networks. Collaboration networks were generated using a variety of layout algorithms then visually presented in the form of knowledge maps. Furthermore, Word Co-occurrence networks of terms from both the Titles field and Keywords field were constructed and analysed to reveal topic trends and bursts. The mapping of recent New Zealand Computer Science research developments was accomplished by using Alluvial diagrams. The change of streams over the time period highlights the nature of, and evolving relations within and amongst topics. The visual results of this research provide a natural way to reveal information. To my knowledge, this is the most comprehensive multilevel study of a specific domain (Computer Science) conducted within New Zealand, to date. The applied methods are transferable to other domains and interdisciplinary endeavours. A real world application of the applied methodology could be an enhancement of the existing interdisciplinary portal (www.nzresearch.org.nz/) with the application of multilevel analysis methods. This could enable collaboration and discovery among scientists across all disciplines. An interactive multimedia presentation of this research including high definition maps and a 3D demonstration of the Topic network can be found at: http://tinyurl.com/BerndMartinThesis It accompanies, supports the findings of, and enhances this written research.

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  • Essays on Macroeconomic Dynamics

    Grechyna, Daryna (2011-07-13)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This dissertation is comprised of three papers devoted to several recent macroeconomic problems. The first two chapters are devoted to the questions of optimal fiscal policy, in particular, to the issues of optimal public debt and deficit under the conditions of aggregate uncertainty and governmental imperfections. The problem of optimal public debt regulation is of particular importance nowadays, when seemingly developed countries face threads of unsustainable debt levels. The first chapter explains different, persistent and large public debt levels in developed countries by the presence of public corruption in these countries. The second chapter studies stochastic behavior of public debt and deficit in the time-consistent setup. The third chapter is devoted to not the least important problem of periodic financial crises that hit developed economies. It proposes evidence in favor of cautious attitude towards too fast financial development of the economies, which are not characterized by corresponding development in other, productive sectors. The first chapter proposes a possible explanation of different and positive government debt levels observed in developed economies. It builds a simple model that relates the level of government debt to the degree of corruptness of the public officials in the country, using neoclassical economy framework with discretionary and non-benevolent government. Public corruption results in higher public debt levels in the steady state. The model reproduces about 76\% of variation in debt-to-GDP levels in a sample of advanced OECD countries as a function of the measure of public corruption in these countries. In the empirical part the assumptions and predictions of the model are tested in a panel of OECD member states. The second chapter considers the implications of optimal taxation for the stochastic behavior of debt and deficit in the economy with discretionary government, focusing on Markov perfect equilibria. It concludes that in such time-consistent setup in case of market incompleteness the properties of the variables are very similar to those in the full commitment case. Moreover, debt shows more persistence than other variables and it increases in response to shocks that cause a higher deficit, which is in accordance with empirical evidence from U.S. data. This result, in contrast to the full commitment case, holds regardless whether the government pursues its optimal fiscal policy under complete markets, or under incomplete markets. The third chapter, based on the joint work with Lorenzo Ductor, investigates possible negative influence of financial development on economic growth. It defines excess finance as a level of the difference between the growth in financial sector and growth in productive sector of the economy, under which the aggregate output decreases. Based on panel data for 33 OECD economies, it is shown, that for smooth economic development the equilibrated growth of both productive (real) and financial sectors is required. Whenever financial development exceeds the development of productive industries by 4.5\% (when measured in terms of growth rates of the two sectors output), there is a thread of reaching the productive capacity bound of the economy, with consequent "financial" crisis. The existence of excess financial development may be justified by the theory of informational overshooting.

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  • He kohikohinga rangahau: a bibliography of Māori and psychology research

    Hollis, H; Cooper, Erana; Braun, V; Pomare, P (2010-09)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Unintentional injuries at home: the role of alcohol, recreational drug use, & fatigue in the greater Auckland, Waikato, & Otago regions in people aged 20 to 64 years

    Kool, B; Ameratunga, S; Sharpe, S (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Unintentional injuries in the home account for a significant burden of injury among all age groups in New Zealand. Falls are the leading cause of injury-related admissions to hospital and one of the three leading causes of injury death in New Zealand. Cutting or piercing injuries are the second leading cause of injury hospitalisation in New Zealand. Home is the most common location for injuries resulting in hospitalisation. The impact of injuries at home among young and middle-age adults may have significant implications for both work productivity and family life. This project was designed to explore modifiable risk factors for unintentional falls and cutting or piecing injuries at home resulting in admission to hospital among young and middle-aged adults (aged 20 to 64 years). The study builds on the Auckland Fall Study previously conducted by the researchers and funded by the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC). The project involved the following methodologies: a review of the published literature to identify risk factors for unintentional cutting or piercing injury or falls at home among young and middle-aged adults; an analysis of routinely collected national data on hospitalisations and deaths for home injuries; an analysis of trauma registry data for home injuries; and a multi-regional population-based case-control study, with a case-crossover component, to identify modifiable risk factors for unintentional falls and cutting or piercing injures at home among the age group of interest .

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  • Progression in the knowledge and philosophy of technology

    Compton, Vicki; Compton, AD (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Prioritising International Sex Crimes before the Special Court for Sierra Leone: Another Instrument of Political Manipulation?

    Mahony, Christopher (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction Over the past two decades the prosecution of international crimes1 has be-come increasingly common, with international organisations and individ-ual States taking political positions over their legitimacy and conduct. Ef-forts to ensure impartiality and independence in the selection of cases prosecuted however, have largely failed. Independent case selection has been compromised because States have sought to impede prosecution where they view doing so as antithetical to their interests. ...

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  • Forest Health News: Eucalypt pest gum leaf skeletoniser reaches the central North Island

    Withers, TM; Gresham, B; Avila Olesen, Gonzalo (2014-10)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Image and Video Technology: 6th Pacific-Rim Symposium, PSIVT 2013, Guanajuato, Mexico, October 28-November 1, 2013. Proceedings

    (2014)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the 6th Pacific Rim Symposium on Image and Video Technology, PSIVT 2013, held in Guanajuato, México in October/November 2013. The total of 43 revised papers was carefully reviewed and selected from 90 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on image/video processing and analysis, image/video retrieval and scene understanding, applications of image and video technology, biomedical image processing and analysis, biometrics and image forensics, computational photography and arts, computer and robot vision, pattern recognition, and video surveillance.

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  • Concise Computer Vision: An Introduction into theory and algorithms

    Klette, Reinhard (2014)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Concise Computer Vision provides an accessible general introduction to the essential topics in computer vision, highlighting the role of important algorithms and mathematical concepts. Classroom-tested programming exercises and review questions are also supplied at the end of each chapter.

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  • Does employee downsizing really work?

    Datta, DK; Basuil Tobias, Dynah (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over the past couple of decades, employee downsizing has become a fact of organizational life, not just in the U.S. but, increasingly so, in other countries, with unprecedented levels of downsizing occurring in several countries during the last recession. Seen as being inevitable in an increasingly competitive global marketplace, the high levels of downsizing activity attest to the deep-seated belief among managers that downsizing enhances organizational efficiency and leads to improved financial performance. Critics, on the other hand, argue that benefits are illusory and point out that attendant costs, both visible and invisible, can make downsizing a relatively ineffective tool for creating firm value. After a brief discussion of the factors that motivate and propel firms to engage in downsizing, we, in this article, examine the findings of extant research to assess whether downsizing does indeed improve organization performance. What we find based on our examination of 55 studies is that the findings are equivocal with very little agreement among researchers on the efficacy of employee downsizing to create organizational value. We explore possible reasons for the same and conclude by providing directions for future research that, we believe, will provide the insights that scholars and managers need to better understand the complex relationship between employee downsizing and firm value.

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