1,773 results for The University of Auckland Library, 2008

  • Analysis and Modelling of Probes in Waveguides and Mobile Radio Propagation and Systems Engineering

    Williamson, Allan (2008)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Isolation of new secondary metabolites from New Zealand marine invertebrates.

    Wojnar, Joanna (2008)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study describes the isolation and structure elucidation of several known and 13 new compounds from New Zealand marine organisms. Furthermore, it describes the development of a digital mask program for the analysis of HSQC spectra of crude sponge extracts. This was used as a screening tool to identify secondary metabolite producers that warranted further analysis. As reports of metabolites from New Zealand nudibranchs are poorly represented in the literature, a study of five New Zealand nudibranch species was undertaken. These coloured and seemingly undefended nudibranchs are known to concentrate or sequester toxic metabolites from their prey, facilitating rapid isolation and structure elucidation of these metabolites. This study resulted in the isolation of a variety of metabolite classes; two new compounds, 13alpha- acetoxypukalide diol (30) and lopholide diol (31) from the nudibranch Tritonia incerta, are described. Examination of the sponge Raspailia agminata resulted in the isolation of a novel family of partially acetylated glycolipids which contain up to six glucose residues. The chromatographic separation of these compounds was a challenge due to the similarity of the congeners and their lack of a chromophore. MSguided isolation eventually led to the purification of agminosides A-E (145-149). An unidentified sponge of the order Dictyoceratida was found to contain a new isomer (186) of the known sesterterpene variabilin. As variabilin-type compounds are predominantly found from sponges of the family Irciniidae, the unidentified sponge is most likely an irciniid. In addition, the sponge contained two prenylated quinones, one of which, 189, is a new isomer of a known sponge metabolite. The sponge Darwinella oxeata contained four new nitrogenous diterpenes of the aplysulphurane (rearranged spongian) skeleton, oxeatamide A (214), isooxeatamide A (215), oxeatamide A 23-methyl ester (216) and oxeatamide B (217).

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  • An instrumental case study of a professional development intervention that uses unfamiliar mathematics to prompt secondary teachers' re-thinking about learning and teaching.

    Paterson, Judith (2008)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study is part of a professional development project working to enhance mathematics achievement and retention in schools in a low socio-economic region in Auckland, New Zealand. Over two years teachers of senior mathematics classes from ten schools attended workshops and meetings at which mathematicians and statisticians from the University of Auckland gave talks on aspects of their academic work. These talks form basis of the intervention that is the focus of this study. The aim of the study was to determine whether, when put in the position of encountering unfamiliar mathematics, teachers would re-view their understanding of learning, and what the results of this experience would be for their understanding of students learning needs and their teaching. In the workshops prompts and questions encouraged the teachers to discuss learning and teaching. It was hypothesised that this could lead to teachers becoming more open to considering change in their practice. A framework was developed in order to categorise the teacher talk that constituted the data. Measured against this framework the data showed that the intervention was effective in encouraging approximately 40% of the group of 31 teachers who attended one or more workshops to consider or enact change in their practice. The data was re-examined at a deeper level seeking to establish how and why the teachers responded as they did. On the basis of this a model of the processes and outcomes of teacher learning in the intervention was developed. This analysis showed that three strands of experience encouraged teachers to consider change in their practice: being re-energised for teaching through being mathematically stimulated; coming to realisations about teaching through introspection and identification with students as learners; and discussing teaching within a supportive learning community. A number of factors and contexts that impacted on teachers, responses to the intervention were identified.

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  • Phage Integrases for Mediating Genomic Integration and DNA Recombination

    Maucksch, Christof (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    φC31 integrase is a site specific recombinase derived from the Streptomyces phage. In the phage lifecycle, the enzyme mediates lysogeny by mediating recombination between specific sequences termed attB (present in the bacterial DNA) and attP (present in the phage genome). Screening the enzyme activity in mammalian cells provided positive results and also showed that the enzyme retained its property of site specific recombination into mammalian genomes. Mammalian genomes have been shown to contain sequences that are similar to the wild type attP sequence of the Streptomyces phage genome and experiments with the integrase in mammalian cells showed that it could mediate recombination and subsequent integration of any DNA bearing an attB site into these pseudoattP sites. ...

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  • Technical support to EU strategy on invasive species (IAS) - Assessment of the impacts of IAS in Europe and the EU (final module report for the European Commission)

    Kettunen, M; Genovesi, P; Gollasch, S; Pagad, Shyama; Starfinger, U; Ten Brink, P; Shine, C (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This assessment provides a picture of the different environmental, social and economic costs and benefits of invasive alien species (IAS) in Europe, constituting the first full assessment of all types of IAS impacts at the pan-European scale. The report is part of the work led by IEEP to support the development of the EU Strategy on IAS.

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  • Technical support to EU strategy on invasive species (IAS) – Policy options to control the negative impacts of IAS on biodiversity in Europe and the EU. Final report for the European Commission

    Shine, C; Kettunen, M; Genovesi, P; Gollasch, S; Pagad, Shyama; Starfinger, U (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This assessment identifies policy measures available to minimise damage of invasive alien species (IAS) to European biodiversity in an efficient and cost-effective manner. It also provides preliminary insights on the feasibility of different policy approaches in the EU context. The report is part of the work led by IEEP to support the development of the EU Strategy on IAS.

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  • Prenatal and Postnatal Nutritional Influences on Neuroendocrine Expression and Susceptibility to Diet-induced Obesity.

    Ikenasio, Bettina (2008)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • SAFDetection: Sensor Analysis based Fault Detection in Tightly-Coupled Multi-Robot Team Tasks

    Li, Xingyan (2008)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This dissertation addresses the problem of detecting faults based on sensor analysis for tightly-coupled multi-robot team tasks. The approach I developed is called SAFDetection, which stands for Sensor Analysis based Fault Detection, pronounced “Safe Detection”. When dealing with robot teams, it is challenging to detect all types of faults because of the complicated environment they operate in and the large spectrum of components used in the robot system. The SAFDetection approach provides a novel methodology for detecting robot faults in situations when motion models and models of multi-robot dynamic interactions are unavailable. The fundamental idea of SAFDetection is to build the robots’ normal behavior model based on the robots’ sensor data. This normal behavior model not only describes the motion pattern for the single robot, but also indicates the interaction among the robots in the same team. Inspired by data mining theory, it combines data clustering techniques with the generation of a probabilistic state transition diagram to model the normal operation of the multi-robot system. The contributions of the SAFDetection approach include: (1) providing a way for a robot system to automatically generate a normal behavior model with little prior knowledge; (2) enabling a robot system to detect physical, logic and interactive faults online; (3) providing a way to build a fault detection capability that is independent of the particular type of fault that occurs; and (4) providing a way for a robot team to generate a normal behavior model for the team based the individual robot’s normal behavior models. SAFDetection has two different versions of implementation on multi-robot teams: the centralized approach and the distributed approach; the preferred approach depends on the size of the robot team, the robot computational capability and the network environment. The SAFDetection approach has been successfully implemented and tested in three robot task scenarios: box pushing (with two robots) and follow-the-leader (implemented with twoand five-robot teams). These experiments have validated the SAFDetection approach and demonstrated its robustness, scalability, and applicability to a wide range of tightly-coupled multi-robot applications.

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  • Decolonizing Democratic Education: Marxian Ruminations

    McLaren, Peter (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Learning Theories and Practice in Translation Studies

    (2008)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Kluwer Law International, International Encyclopaedia of Laws, Corporations and Partnership, New Zealand

    Williams, Gordon (2008)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The social ecology of new technologies and haemophilia in New Zealand: "A bleeding nuisance" revisited

    Park, Juliet; York, Deon (2008)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bosnian or Bosniac: Aspects of a Contemporary Slavic Language Question

    Greenberg, Robert (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Targeted delivery of polypeptides to antigen presenting cells by a modified bacterial superantigen

    McIntosh, Julie (2008)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Introduction

    Carpenter, VM; Jesson, Jocelyn; Roberts, Peter; Stephenson, Maxine (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Positive development: from vicious circles to virtuous cycles through built environment design

    Birkeland, Janis (2008-07-01)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    This book challenges everyone working in or studying the areas of sustainable development, planning, architecture or the built environment to rethink their ...

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  • Taking a sociocultural approach: What does it really mean?

    Hill, Edite (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cross-Cultural Natural Sanctuaries: Exploring New Paths Towards Sacred Secularity

    Sunde, Charlotte (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Positive Development: From Vicious Circles to Virtuous Cycles through Built Environment Design

    Birkeland, Janis (2008)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Our current methods for addressing sustainability challenges are shaped by institutional and intellectual frameworks that reflect negative, defensive attitudes towards the environment. Negative impacts are seen as inevitable, so we only aim to slow the pace of environmental destruction. The belief that we have no option but to ‘trade off’ nature for social and economic gain is deeply engrained. We assume the best that sustainable development can do is provide (short-term) social benefits that compensate for long-term ecological losses. Traditionally, policymakers and environmental managers have thought they were dealing with sustainable development issues by merely monitoring, measuring, managing and mitigating the predicted negative impacts of future plans, policies and designs. However, creating environments that are socially and ecologically productive requires breaking out of our mental cubicles and undoing what has already been done. Towards that end, this book provides: • New paradigms and design concepts that enable us to expand future options, increase resource security, increase human and ecological health, and improve life quality for all. • New design criteria, review processes, assessment tools and design methods that shift from narrow ‘input–output thinking’ to design that supports natural systems and communities. • New approaches to analysis, assessment and management systems that move from mitigating negative impacts to multiplying positive ecological and social synergies. • New approaches to futures planning methods, strategies and incentives that do not just prepare for a grim future, but increase the means of survival and meaningful life choices.

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  • Women’s Understandings of Sexuality, Sex and Sexual Problems: An Interview Study

    Bellamy, Gary (2008-10)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background There are a paucity of studies that address women’s own understandings of sexuality and sexual problems. Much of the research and theory which underpin current diagnostic criteria for sexual problems is based upon a set of sexual norms which are predicated upon male experience. Moreover, these dominant understandings, entrenched in a perspective that favours the material body, fail to take account of contextual factors of women’s experiences. Objectives Within a diverse sample of women: to examine understandings of sexuality and sexual problems; explore the importance of sexual activity using their own definitions; and identify the influence of wider socio-cultural factors upon understandings of sexuality and sexual problems. Methods In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with thirteen women recruited from the general public and ten women recruited from a psychosexual clinic aged 23-72 years. Data analysis Data were analysed thematically using the conventions of template analysis within a material-discursive framework. Findings The findings of this study suggest that women’s understandings of sexuality, sex and sexual problems should be understood as bodily ‘experienced’ and socially and psychologically mediated. Participants also appear to be influenced by the relational context of their experience and draw upon a patriarchal explanatory framework to make sense of their own sexual functioning and satisfaction. Conclusions This study poses a challenge to the recent drive to medicalise women’s sexual problems via the Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD) label. The findings dispute current diagnostic criteria for sexual problems which presuppose a highly individualized framework and take very little account of contextual factors. Consequently, this study concludes that such criteria need to consider biological, social, psychological as well as patriarchal and historical factors in determining the meaning and importance of sexuality, sex and sexual problems to women.

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