1,477 results for The University of Auckland Library, 2012

  • Creative Printmaking in New Zealand, 1930-2007: An Annotated Bibliography

    Ward, Fiona (2012)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    This Annotated Bibliography includes 105 references that record all available published, unpublished and digital material about the history of creative printmaking in New Zealand from 1930 to 2007. As New Zealand academics and printmakers have noted, while other visual media such as painting and photography have always been included in the discourse of art history in New Zealand, for various reasons printmaking has been gradually excluded and marginalised. There is a need to foster an academic and critical interest in printmaking to provide a framework to enable further research and scholarship. This Annotated Bibliography will support future academic and critical explorations of the topic.

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  • Prioritising International Sex Crimes before the Special Court for Sierra Leone: Another Instrument of Political Manipulation?

    Mahony, Christopher (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction Over the past two decades the prosecution of international crimes1 has be-come increasingly common, with international organisations and individ-ual States taking political positions over their legitimacy and conduct. Ef-forts to ensure impartiality and independence in the selection of cases prosecuted however, have largely failed. Independent case selection has been compromised because States have sought to impede prosecution where they view doing so as antithetical to their interests. ...

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  • Population Viability Analysis of Lear’s Macaw – Anodorhynchus leari (Análise de Viabilidade Populacional para Arara-azul-de-lear)

    Campos, Ivan; Lugarini, C; Sousa, AEB; Barbosa, AEA; Miyaki, CY; Aguilar, TM; Amaral, ACA; Linares, SFTP; Nascimento, JLX; Barros, YM; Guedes, NMR; Oliveira, KG (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A Crise

    Silva, Pedro (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • From text to pretext: An ethical turn in curriculum work

    Maheux, Jean-Francois; Swanson, D; Khan, S (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Embracing LOLitics: Popular culture, online political humor, and play 

    Tay, Geniesa Jin San (2012-10-01)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Internet, and Web 2.0 tools can empower audiences to actively participate in media creation. This allows the production of large quantities of content, both amateur and professional. Online memes, which are extensions of usually citizen-created viral content, are a recent and popular example of this. This thesis examines the participation of ordinary individuals in political culture online through humor creation. It focuses on citizen-made political humor memes as an example of engaged citizen discourse. The memes comprise of photographs of political figures altered either by captions or image editing software, and can be compared to more traditional mediums such as political cartoons, and 'green screens' used in filmmaking. Popular culture is often used as a 'common language' to communicate meanings in these texts. This thesis thus examines the relationship between political and popular culture. It also discusses the value of 'affinity spaces', which actively encourage users to participate in creating and sharing the humorous political texts. Some examples of the political humor memes include: the subversion of Vladimir Putin's power by poking fun at his masculine characteristics through acts similar to fanfiction, celebrating Barack Obama’s love of Star Wars, comparing a candid photograph of John McCain to fictional nonhuman creatures such as zombies using photomanipulation, and the wide variety of immediate responses to Osama bin Laden's death. This thesis argues that much of the idiosyncratic nature of the political humor memes comes from a motivation that lies in non-serious play, though they can potentially offer legitimate political criticism through the myths 'poached' from popular culture.

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  • Pathways to Positive Development for Muslim Immigrant Youth in Western Contexts

    Stuart, Jaime (2012)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Muslim youth growing up in Western contexts face a complex set of issues as a result of meeting the various, and often incongruent, expectations placed upon them by their family, religion, ethnic community and host national society. This group of young people is often thought to face high risks of maladaptation, as they potentially experience the negative effects of acculturation more so than host nationals or other immigrant youth. Recent research, however, has suggested that many Muslim migrant young people are successfully negotiating their experiences of cultural transition in Western societies. Therefore, the major aim of this thesis was to obtain systematic data on young Muslim migrant’s “pathways to positive development”, or how these young people achieve successful adaptation in the face of adversity.

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  • The role of culture in teaching and learning: Exploring culturally inclusive pedagogy and its possible implications for Tongan boys in secondary schools

    Fa'avae, David (2012)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study explores the role of culture in teaching and learning. It affirms the notion that culture is important in the learning and achievement of Pacific Island students. Using autoethnographic method, the educational narrative of a Tongan male secondary school teacher is articulated and critically analysed. Autoethnography is an approach used by the researcher to look deeply into his experiences as a Tongan student, and now a Tongan secondary school teacher, in understanding the role of culture and ethnicity in the teaching and learning process. Reflecting on his personal narratives is a way to “legitim[ise] [his] knowledge”(Smith, 1999, p. 2) as a minority teacher, seeking to understand possible implications of his practices in Tongan boys’ learning. Themes from the literature review highlight the various ways in which culture is attributed more or less importance in teaching and learning. Both the narrative and themes from the literature affirm that teachers in Aotearoa New Zealand must comprehensively improve their ability to implement culturally inclusive pedagogy that is developed to encompass Pacific students as diverse learners.

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  • Violations of the Rights of the Rapa Nui People and Rapa Nui Individuals according to the American Convention on Human Rights

    Tomas, Violet (2012)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    A separate report commissioned by the Observatorio Cuidadano to assess alleged violations by the Chilean government against the Rapa Nui people in 2010 and 2011 under the American Convention on Human Rights.

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  • A Simple Diversity Linker Strategy Using Immobilised Enol Phosphonates as Electrophiles for Suzuki-Miyaura Reactions

    Woods, Tom (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Report on the Human Rights of the Rapa Nui People on Easter Island

    Chartier, C; Chirif, A; Tomas, Violet (2012)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    An international Observers Report to assess human rights violations of Rapa Nui people by the Chilean government. For its preparation, the observers visited Easter Island and Santiago, the capital of Chile, in the month of August 2011, where they held meetings with traditional authorities and Rapa Nui organizations, Chilean authorities, Mapuche indigenous organizations and human rights entities. The Report was prompted by acts of police violence and criminalization of the territorial claims of the Rapa Nui peoples which occurred in the years 2010 and 2011.

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  • Adaptive Sampling Designs Inference for Sparse and Clustered Populations

    Seber, George; Salehi, MM (2012-10-22)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    This book aims to provide an overview of some adaptive techniques used in estimating parameters for finite populations where the sampling at any stage depends on the sampling information obtained to date.

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  • Review of the book Kia tangi te titi: Permission to speak - successful schooling for Maori students in the 21st century, Paul Whitinui (ed.)

    Lee, Jennifer (2012)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    While the centrality of culture in Maori education is mostly used in this book in reference to relationships between non-Mäori teachers and Maori students (and their whänau), I want to use cultural connectedness to describe the way culture is also related to and implicated in theory, research, policy and practice in some of the chapters. Hana O'Regan' s personal narrative intersects with international research, historical accounts of New Zealand schooling and decolonising critiques providing a great overview for understanding how the threat of Maori language death has occurred (and continues), and what it may mean for our survival as Maori.

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  • Power measures derived from the sequential query process

    Pritchard,; Reyhani,; Wilson, MC (2012)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    We study a basic sequential model for the discovery of winning coalitions in a simple game, well known from its use in de ning the Shapley-Shubik power index. We derive in a uniform way a family of measures of collective and individual power in simple games, and show that, as for the Shapley-Shubik index, they extend naturally to measures for TU-games. In particular, the individual measures include all weighted semivalues. We single out the simplest measure in our family for more investigation, as it is new to the literature as far as we know. Although it is very di erent from the Shapley value, it is closely related in several ways, and is the natural analogue of the Shapley value under a nonstandard, but natural, de nition of simple game. We illustrate this new measure by calculating its values on some standard examples.

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  • Diabetes Management by Primary Health Care Nurses in Auckland: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Daly, Barbara (2012)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aim: The main aim of this thesis is to investigate the role of primary health care (PHC) nurses and their impact in the clinical management of diabetes patients in the largest city in New Zealand. Specific aims include, identifying and describing PHC nurses demographic and workplace details, education and training needs, their diabetes knowledge and factors associated with best practice. Methods: A total of 287 PHC nurses, 26% of the total number working in Auckland, the largest urban area in New Zealand, were randomly sampled in a cross-sectional survey. The nurses completed a self-administered questionnaire and telephone interview – (86% response rate). All three groups of PHC nurses (practice, district and specialist diabetes) involved in the management of diabetes patients in a community setting were included in the survey. In addition, details were collected for 265 diabetes patients, who had been consulted by 41% of the nurse participants on a randomly selected day. Results: Almost half of the practice nurses (PNs) and specialist nurses (SNs) were aged over 50 years and tended to be older than district nurse (DNs), of whom 46% were 41 to 50 years old. A greater proportion of SNs had post-graduate qualifications and specific diabetes education and experience compared with PNs and DNs, while more DNs (35%) and PNs (32%) had worked in their current workplace for >10 years compared with SNs (14%, p=0.004). DNs had the least administrative facilities available, particularly regarding access to computers and patient information, and also felt the least valued in the management of diabetes. Most nurses (96%) were able to identify excess body weight as a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes and elevated blood glucose levels or glycosylated haemoglobin (86%) for diabetes-related complications. In contrast, cardiovascular risk factors were less well identified, particularly smoking, although more by SNs (43%) than PNs (14%) and DNs (12%, p=0.0005). Cardiovascular complications, especially stroke, were less well known than microvascular complications, and by significantly fewer PNs (13%) and DNs (8%) than SNs (36%, p=0.002). In general, stronger associations were found between nurse’s knowledge of elevated glycosylated haemoglobin as a risk factor for diabetes-related complications and management activities related to blood glucose levels and medication, compared with knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors, which was not associated with assessment of blood pressure or knowledge of patient’s total cholesterol or smoking status. PNs consulted almost 60% of the patients sampled, while patients consulted by DNs tended to be older and were more likely to be European New Zealanders, tobacco users, have diabetes-related complications and co-morbidities; while SNs consulted more Māori and Pacific patients and those with co-morbidities. The proportion of patients smoking (16%) was over double that of diabetes patients reported in international studies, and patients who were consulted by DNs were more likely to smoke, OR=3.53 (1.49, 8.37, p=0.005), compared with those who consulted PNs, and those consulted by SNs OR=1.69 (0.75, 3.78); while older patients (>67 years) were less likely to smoke compared with those aged < 50 years, OR=0.23 (0.08, 0.62, p=0.004). Most patients had a systolic blood pressure (62%) and total cholesterol (71%) above recommended levels. Māori and Pacific ethnicity were positively associated with glycosylated haemoglobin, while being aged over 66 years was negatively associated. Male gender and Asian ethnicity were positively associated with total cholesterol which was negatively associated with systolic blood pressure. Conclusion Although the majority of nurses targeted elevated blood glucose levels or glycosylated haemoglobin, more effective management is required to reduce cardiovascular risk factors, particularly smoking. Education, training and support is vital for PNs because they consult the majority of diabetes patients, and for DNs (who consult patients with their families or Whānau) to adopt cardioprotective lifestyles, including easy access to nicotine replacement therapy, so that both groups of nurses have a greater impact in the primary prevention of diabetes. The PNs consulted almost 60% of the patients sampled, while patients consulted by DNs tended to be older and were more likely to be European New Zealanders, tobacco users, have diabetes-related complications and co-morbidities; while SNs consulted more Māori and Pacific patients and those with co-morbidities. The proportion of patients smoking (16%) was over double that of diabetes patients reported in international studies, and patients who were consulted by DNs were more likely to smoke, OR=3.53 (1.49, 8.37, p=0.005), compared with those who consulted PNs, and those consulted by SNs OR=1.69 (0.75, 3.78); while older patients (>67 years) were less likely to smoke compared with those aged < 50 years, OR=0.23 (0.08, 0.62, p=0.004). Most patients had a systolic blood pressure (62%) and total cholesterol (71%) above recommended levels. Māori and Pacific ethnicity were positively associated with glycosylated haemoglobin, while being aged over 66 years was negatively associated. Male gender and Asian ethnicity were positively associated with total cholesterol which was negatively associated with systolic blood pressure. Conclusion Although the majority of nurses targeted elevated blood glucose levels or glycosylated haemoglobin, more effective management is required to reduce cardiovascular risk factors, particularly smoking. Education, training and support is vital for PNs because they consult the majority of diabetes patients, and for DNs (who consult patients with their families or Whānau) to adopt cardioprotective lifestyles, including easy access to nicotine replacement therapy, so that both groups of nurses have a greater impact in the primary prevention of diabetes.

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  • O Contributo do E-Government para a Promoção da Paz e Estabilidade

    Silva, Pedro (2012)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    We argue that e-Government can significantly contribute to international peace and security, since it is a tool that has an impact on the empowerment of States. In fact, initial studies on the importance of e-Government were focused OECD states, and didn’t address its use in developing countries, and particularly in conflit states. With this article we intend to contribute to the debate about the benefits e-Government to fragile states, and consequently, to international peace and security. We started out paper by analysing failed states, and its implications for international peace and security. Then we focused on the ways to empower the role of the state. After this analysis, we addressed e-Government, observing it’s objectives and capabilities. We then defined the dimensions to present our argument, using the multidimensional analysis model typologies, and we also used a tool for the demonstration of causal relationships. We conclude that e-government contributes to the increase of state capa - city, either at central level, whether at the local level. We also argued that the implementation of e-Government in failed states directly contributes to good government of public assets and public finance, increases the investment in human capital, as well as improves the administrative control of the territory by increasing transparency, while establishing the rule of law. By impact State capacities, e-Government acts on the causes of state’s weakness, contributing to state’ functioning and empowerment. Thus, by dealing with the causes, it reduces the sovereignty gap that characterizes failing states. This is why we argue that e-Government has a significant a role in international peace and security.

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  • Biblical Scholarship, Jews and Israel: On Bruce Malina, Conspiracy Theories and Ideological Contradictions

    Myles, Robert; Crossley, JG (2012-12)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Comparing Stories - How Textual Structure Shapes Affective Experience in New Media

    Veale, Kevin (2012)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stories told through different media forms feel very distinctive from each other, to such an extent that there are stories which can only be told through one media form -- at least, if preserving the distinctive affective quality of the experience is a priority. Is this due to something innate to the story which makes it hard to translate outside of its context, or is it the context itself that sets the experience apart? Phenomenology provides a way of understanding how the media-specific structures of textual storytelling can shape the experience of negotiating that text, through altering the affective processes associated with its navigation. This project argues that it is possible to distinguish amongst storytelling in multiple media forms by analysing how differences in textual structure (and the processes required to engage with them) shape the phenomenological experience of those texts. I apply an analytical framework of affective phenomenology to case-study forms of textual storytelling, including videogames, hypertext fiction, webcomics, and Alternate Reality Games. All of these case studies share a new media context, and so their outward similarities will highlight the differences in the experiences they present. I argue that hypertext fictions provide environments for readers to engage with, either as explorers negotiating unfamiliar territory, or detectives seeking connections between disparate material. The webcomic is distinguished from other forms of mediated storytelling by the amount of time spent engaging with characters within the text, which leads to a perception of intimacy as part of the experience. Videogames are set apart by the sense of responsibility felt by the player for events and their consequences within the Heideggerian world-of-concern established with the text and its characters. Alternate Reality Games are texts which function at the level of the community rather than the individual, are experienced as phenomenologically real, and are further distinguished by their textual boundaries functioning at the level of affective investment rather than the specific processes involved in negotiating the text. I argue that the definition of media texts should include how we engage with their textual structures, rather than focus purely on the textual structures themselves. Affective phenomenology and the process of analytical juxtaposition presented in this project provide the beginnings of a map for negotiating this new conceptual territory, and will become particularly relevant as texts and textual forms migrate across platforms.

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  • China’s Bids for International Events: A Study of Central - Local Relations

    Chu, Pok (2012)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Chinese cities have bid for international events since the 1980s. To increase their odds of success, central and local executive elites as well as central and local Party elites all participate in bids. The central and local executive elites are senior officials of the State Council, ministries and their affiliated units, and local governments. Their duty is to implement official bid tasks on behalf of the Chinese candidate cities. The central and local Party elites are members of the Chinese Communist Party Politburo Standing Committee and chairpersons of the local Party Committees. Their participation is to give support to the Chinese candidate cities. The pattern of division of labour between the central and local executive elites in implementing official bid tasks and the attitudes of both central and local Party elites in giving support are found to vary from case to case. This thesis intends to understand what factors have significant influence to shape the division of labour between the central and local executive elites in implementing each bid and the attitudes of both central and local Party elites in supporting each bid. Through reviewing Beijing's bid for the 2008 Olympic Games; Shanghai's bid for the 2010 World Expo; Guangzhou's bid for the 2010 Asian Games; and Shenzhen's bid for the 2011 Summer World University Games, the stipulations of international organisations are confirmed as a factor that has significant influence to shape the pattern of division of labour between the central and local executive elites in implementing each bid, and Factionalism is refuted as a factor that has significant influence to shape the attitudes of both central and local Party elites in supporting each bid. This thesis hence concluded that (1) China is a rule-abiding and effective international bidder, and (2) international norms have replaced local factionalism in shaping the behaviour of the Chinese officials in dealing with the duties assigned by international bodies. These findings imply that the Chinese government uses international bids to demonstrate its willingness and competence to bear the responsibility as a member in the international society.

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  • Satu Dekade Kondisi Hutan Mangrove di Teluk Ambon, Maluku (A Decade of Mangrove Forest Condition in Ambon Bay, Matuku)

    Suyadi, Suyadi (2012)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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