1 results for Unitec, Report, Factors affecting the uptake of building information modelling (BIM) in the Auckland architecture, engineering & construction (AEC) industry

  • Factors affecting the uptake of building information modelling (BIM) in the Auckland architecture, engineering & construction (AEC) industry

    McCartney, Christian (2010)

    Report
    Unitec

    Building Information Modelling (BIM) is seen as the next big paradigm shift in the building design and construction industry since the move from traditional drafting to 2D computer aided design systems, but although it has been available for a number of years, its adoption and use in the New Zealand, and specifically Auckland Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry has been relatively limited. During the course of this study, a number of interviews were held with industry professionals from the architecture, structural engineering, services engineering, and construction contractor industry sectors, to gain an insight into how they currently use BIM, and what benefits and barriers they encountered in its use and implementation. The interview participants were selected using purposive sampling based on what was already known about the participant’s use of BIM. Interviews were semi-structured and semiformal in nature. The findings of this research showed that most industry sectors are currently using BIM as a three dimensional coordination tool for coordinating the various design disciplines, as well as for 3D clash detection and 2D document production. Other reasons for BIM use included producing 3D and 4D visualizations and virtual walkthroughs to help nontechnical people understand the design intent. Although the literature describes training and cost of implementation as major factors affecting the uptake of BIM, most of the research participants downplayed these issues, explaining that adopting BIM was a commercial decision made to stay ahead of their competitors, and that the extra training involved actually improved the skill base of their organizations. Ultimately, what was found by this study is that to progress with the use of BIM, changes must be made to the whole process of design and construction. A truly integrated and collaborative approach must be adopted where the various designers and contractors involved in a construction project work closely together using BIM to achieve gains in coordination, productivity, cost management, and overall project outcomes.

    View record details