9 results for Unitec, Report, 2010

  • Factors influencing the ownership and management structure decision making in hotel investments

    Krivosheev, Antonia (2010)

    Report
    Unitec

    Hotel properties constitute a relatively small percentage out of the commercial property investment sector in New Zealand due to two main factors. One is the significant amount of capital required for the development of such properties while the second factor is the direct relationship between the developer and the specialized tourism industry. The ownership and management structures of such property investment activities are crucial as they determine the risk and financial performance associated with such investments in the long term. The purpose of the research is to assess the hotel development process in terms of ownership and management structures by identifying the common ownership and management structures and factors influencing on the decision making of such structures. The research reports on the findings of a multi-method methodology approach. Firstly, a survey participated in by major hotel developers within New Zealand has been conducted to assess the common ownership and management structures and the factors influencing the decision making of such structures. Mainly multi-criteria and some open questions have been used to assess the weight attached to each structure. Secondly, in-depth open-ended interviews have been conducted in order to fully clarify and support the data obtained from the survey results. The research develops the contention that the most commonly used ownership structure in the New Zealand hotel investment market is the Strata Title, while the contractual relationship with the hotel operator is the most commonly used management structure. Furthermore, the study argues that financial factors have a significantly higher influence on the decision making of the ownership and management structures compared with non-financial factors that cannot directly be measured in dollar terms.

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  • Factors affecting the uptake of building information modelling (BIM) in the Auckland architecture, engineering & construction (AEC) industry

    McCartney, Christian (2010)

    Report
    Unitec

    Building Information Modelling (BIM) is seen as the next big paradigm shift in the building design and construction industry since the move from traditional drafting to 2D computer aided design systems, but although it has been available for a number of years, its adoption and use in the New Zealand, and specifically Auckland Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry has been relatively limited. During the course of this study, a number of interviews were held with industry professionals from the architecture, structural engineering, services engineering, and construction contractor industry sectors, to gain an insight into how they currently use BIM, and what benefits and barriers they encountered in its use and implementation. The interview participants were selected using purposive sampling based on what was already known about the participant’s use of BIM. Interviews were semi-structured and semiformal in nature. The findings of this research showed that most industry sectors are currently using BIM as a three dimensional coordination tool for coordinating the various design disciplines, as well as for 3D clash detection and 2D document production. Other reasons for BIM use included producing 3D and 4D visualizations and virtual walkthroughs to help nontechnical people understand the design intent. Although the literature describes training and cost of implementation as major factors affecting the uptake of BIM, most of the research participants downplayed these issues, explaining that adopting BIM was a commercial decision made to stay ahead of their competitors, and that the extra training involved actually improved the skill base of their organizations. Ultimately, what was found by this study is that to progress with the use of BIM, changes must be made to the whole process of design and construction. A truly integrated and collaborative approach must be adopted where the various designers and contractors involved in a construction project work closely together using BIM to achieve gains in coordination, productivity, cost management, and overall project outcomes.

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  • Property development on Auckland's Hauraki Gulf islands

    Sutton, James (2010)

    Report
    Unitec

    The Hauraki Gulf consists of ninety two islands that are contained within the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park. This report aims to explain why property development occurs more on certain islands, rather than others, within the Hauraki Gulf. This is achieved by identifying the key drivers and barriers to property development and determining the perceptions that influence these factors. The research commenced with a comprehensive literature and document analysis from which key themes and ideas were extracted. From these key themes and ideas, ten interview questions were developed. Face to face interviews with ten industry professionals involved in property development on the Hauraki Gulf islands were then carried out. The aim of the interviews was to evaluate real life examples and perceptions to compare with the results of the literature and document analysis. The research identified a wide range of factors affecting property development on the Hauraki Gulf Islands. Overwhelming evidence from the interview participants suggests that Auckland City Council has the greatest affect on property development followed by island accessibility & transport. The research also identified that there is a need for the Gulf Islands to be treated independently from one another, and what is a significant factors affecting property development on one island may not be a driver or barrier for another.

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  • Employee preferences for work-life balance initiatives in a large New Zealand construction company

    Morrison, Emily Jane (2010)

    Report
    Unitec

    Work-life balance initiatives are often provided by companies to counter the prevalence of work-life conflict stemming from today‟s societal pressures. The construction industry can be a high pressure, high stress industry demanding long working hours, and it is posited that work-life balance initiatives are important for the future sustainability of the industry. Relatively little is known regarding the types of initiatives employees within the New Zealand construction industry prefer. The study‟s objectives are to (1) rank and compare preferences for work-life balance initiatives of employees within a large New Zealand construction company and compare these results with those of a similar Australian study (Lingard and Francis, 2005) and (2) use the demographic information gathered to define typical working hours. The survey method incorporating an electronic questionnaire enabled the collection of a cross-section of wide-ranging, empirical data from a large number of respondents in a relatively short amount of time. Elicited data included demographic information, employee preference ratings for work-life balance initiatives and two, qualitative, open ended questions. The results show that employees are interested in a variety of work-life balance initiatives and do have concerns regarding different issues around work-life balance. Findings support the notion that there is no „one-size-fits-all‟ policy appropriate for all companies or group of employees and that the provision of a wide variety of initiatives from which employees can choose during different stages in their life and career is ideal. Furthermore, it was found that a significant portion of employees work very long hours and that working hours vary significantly depending on job role and location. Qualitative results suggest that there is some work-life conflict associated with working long hours and weekend work. In order to attract and maintain valuable employees, it is important that the industry continually strives to provide useful work-life balance initiatives, reasonable working hours for its employees, and supportive workplace cultures in line with such initiatives. Further study could address whether or not employees feel organisational culture, supervisors and managers support the initiatives provided within their company. A sub-research question could investigate whether employees are aware of all available initiatives and how they are used.

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  • BIM 2010: The benefits and barriers for construction contractors in Auckland

    Morrison, Callum (2010)

    Report
    Unitec

    Building Information Modelling (BIM) is the process of using computer software to create object-oriented, parametric models of buildings from which useful data can be retrieved. BIM can be used either collaboratively or under a traditional procurement structure, however collaboration is required to realise the full potential of the process. Building Information Modelling represents an opportunity for main contractors in Auckland to counter the productivity losses that have been experienced in the New Zealand construction industry. Despite this, the adoption of BIM technologies by main contractors in Auckland appears to be much slower than in the United States or Europe where a large number of benefits have been documented as stemming from the use of the process. Further adoption of BIM in Auckland will be dictated both by real benefits and barriers and perceived benefits and barriers. By conducting seven semi-structured interviews with medium to large commercial main contractors operating in Auckland this exploratory research has allowed a comparison between the benefits and barriers experienced by foreign contractors with the experiences and perceptions of medium to large main contractors operating in the Auckland construction industry towards BIM. Although a number of the surveyed main contractors were already using BIM technologies, the research has found that their level of engagement with the Building Information Modelling process has been relatively low. This has meant that the intensity of both the benefits and the barriers is lower than those documented in the predominantly foreign literature. All the surveyed contractors felt that the use of BIM technologies would grow within the Auckland market, but also that the drive towards this growth will not come from main contractors.

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  • Implementing web-based project management systems in the New Zealand construction industry

    Goodhue, James (2010)

    Report
    Unitec

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  • Sustainable retrofit in the New Zealand residential sector

    McKechnie, Stuart (2010)

    Report
    Unitec

    A large proportion of New Zealand’s existing housing stock performs poorly, particularly in terms of energy efficiency. As homeowners tend to be reluctant to invest in sustainable retrofit activities, policy interventions or initiatives are often introduced in an attempt to improve uptake. The aim of this research was to identify a range of strategies that could be implemented to improve the uptake of sustainable retrofit activities in existing homes in New Zealand. Data was collected from government, industry and homeowners to establish each group’s preferences for different types of sustainable retrofit strategies. The overall objective was to integrate these findings in an attempt to determine whether there was any consensus of opinion. The findings indicate that there was no clear consensus of opinion. In terms of preference for different types of strategies, government appears to prefer market mechanisms and “other” interventions; as evidenced by their support of initiatives such as the residential rating tool, the provision of information and the sponsorship of education and research. Industry believes that regulation and financial incentives have the most potential to improve uptake. Preferred strategies include minimum performance standards and mandatory environmental performance ratings; plus providing subsidies and interest free loans for homeowners undertaking sustainable retrofit. Homeowners appear to favour strategies that are not regulatory, onerous or inequitable. Preferred strategies include financial incentives like interest-free loans; and other initiatives such as fast-tracking building consent processes. As government appears to be willing to let the market decide - and homeowners do not want to be burdened with additional cost - it will be “business-as-usual” unless market transformation occurs. Ultimately, government needs to explicitly realise the benefits of sustainable retrofit, and then proceed to take extensive measures to incentivise it. Homeowners also need to be convinced that the benefits of sustainable retrofit can offset the costs of implementation. Only then will the uptake of sustainable retrofit activity really take off.

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  • Risk analysis of public private partnerships in the development of new schools in New Zealand

    Rothery, Mark (2010)

    Report
    Unitec

    The following report has been compiled for Industry Project, a paper within Unitec’s Bachelor of Construction (CM). This report intends to evaluate the influence of risk in the procurement of a new school in New Zealand under a Public Private Partnership. Senior Unitec Lecturer Roger Birchmore will be supervising and grading this report.

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  • Engaging SME subcontractors on alliance delivered infrastructure projects

    Wieneke, Karl (2010)

    Report
    Unitec

    This research report is aimed at identifying the issues that are encountered by an Alliance when engaging SME subcontractors on a major infrastructure project. It also aims to investigate how these issues are compounded when additional SME subcontractors are engaged to work on an Alliance delivered infrastructure project in New Zealand. To investigate this topic, the research question was defined as: What are the issues with engaging SME subcontractors in a conventional manner on an Alliance project? The findings of this report were gathered from the analysis of documentation and opinions of interview participants from the Victoria Park Tunnel Project (VPT). This project is currently under construction and is being delivered through an Alliance procurement methodology. The key issues identified from this report have indicated that the use of SME subcontractors leads to additional management and associated risks to an Alliance team. To optimise the use of SME subcontractors, additional support needs to be provided to them to aid their development and capability for use on future Alliance delivered projects in New Zealand.

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