119 results for University of Canterbury Library, Journal article

  • Seismic vulnerability assessment of residential buildings using logistic regression and geographic information system (GIS) in Pleret Sub District (Yogyakarta, Indonesia)

    Saputra A; Rahardianto T; Revindo MD; Delikostidis I; Hadmoko DS; Sartohadi J; Gomez C (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Background: The Southeast of Yogyakarta City has had the heaviest damages to buildings in the 2006 of Yogyakarta Earthquake disaster. A moderate to strong earthquake of 6.3 Mw shook the 20 km southeast part of the Yogyakarta City early in the morning at 5:54 local time. On top of extensive damage in Yogyakarta and Central Java, more than 5700 people perished; 37,927 people were injured in the collapse of more than 240,396 residential buildings. Furthermore, the earthquake also affected the infrastructure and local economic activities. The total damages and losses because of the earthquake was 29.1 trillion rupiahs or equal to approximately 3.1 million US dollar. Two main factors that caused the severe damages were a dense population and the lack of seismic design of residential buildings. After reconstruction and rehabilitation, the area where the study was conducted grew into a densely populated area. This urbanistic change is feared to be potentially the lead to a great disaster if an earthquake occurs again. Thus, a comprehensive study about building vulnerability is absolutely needed in study area. Therefore, the main objective of this study has been the provision of a probabilistic model of seismic building vulnerability based on the damage data of the last big earthquake. By considering the relationship between building characteristics, site conditions, and the damage level based on probabilistic analysis, this study can offer a better understanding of earthquake damage estimation for residential building in Java. Results: The main findings of this study were as follows: The most vulnerable building type is the reinforced masonry structure with clay tile roof, it is located between 8.1-10 km of the epicentre and it is built on young Merapi volcanic deposits. On the contrary, the safest building type is the houses which has characteristics of reinforced masonry structure, asbestos or zinc roof type, and being located in Semilir Formation. The results showed that the building damage probability provided a high accuracy of prediction about 75.81%. Conclusions: The results explain the prediction of building vulnerability based on the building damaged of the Yogyakarta earthquake 2006. This study is suitable for preliminary study at the region scale. Thus, the site investigation still needs to be conducted for the future research to determine the safety and vulnerability of residential building.

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  • Risk-based structural fire design

    Abu, A. (2014)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    To date, structural fire design has been largely based on extreme fire scenarios. Now the University of Canterbury is investigating using probabilistic assessment to improve building performance during fires.

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  • Respiratory mechanics assessment for reverse-triggered breathing cycles using pressure reconstruction

    Major, V.; Corbett, S.; Redmond, D.; Beatson, A.; Glassenbury, D.; Chiew, Y.S.; Pretty, C.G.; Desaive, T.; Szlávecz, A.; Benyo, B.; Shaw, G.M.; Chase, J.G. (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Monitoring patient-specific respiratory mechanics can be used to guide mechanical ventilation (MV) therapy in critically ill patients. However, many patients can exhibit spontaneous breathing (SB) efforts during ventilator supported breaths, altering airway pressure waveforms and hindering model-based (or other) identification of the true, underlying respiratory mechanics necessary to guide MV. This study aims to accurately assess respiratory mechanics for breathing cycles masked by SB efforts. A cumulative pressure reconstruction method is used to ameliorate SB by identifying SB affected waveforms and reconstructing unaffected pressure waveforms for respiratory mechanics identification using a single-compartment model. Performance is compared to conventional identification without reconstruction, where identified values from reconstructed waveforms should be less variable. Results are validated with 9485 breaths affected by SB, including periods of muscle paralysis that eliminates SB, as a validation test set where reconstruction should have no effect. In this analysis, the patients are their own control, with versus without reconstruction, as assessed by breath-to-breath variation using the non-parametric coefficient of variation (CV) of respiratory mechanics. Pressure reconstruction successfully estimates more consistent respiratory mechanics. CV of estimated respiratory elastance is reduced up to 78% compared to conventional identification (p < 0.05). Pressure reconstruction is comparable (p > 0.05) to conventional identification during paralysis, and generally performs better as paralysis weakens, validating the algorithm’s purpose. Pressure reconstruction provides less-affected pressure waveforms, ameliorating the effect of SB, resulting in more accurate respiratory mechanics identification. Thus providing the opportunity to use respiratory mechanics to guide mechanical ventilation without additional muscle relaxants, simplifying clinical care and reducing risk.

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  • Minimally invasive, patient specific, beat-by-beat estimation of left ventricular time varying elastance

    Davidson S; Pretty C; Pironet A; Kamoi S; Balmer J; Desaive T; Chase JG (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Background: The aim of this paper was to establish a minimally invasive method for deriving the left ventricular time varying elastance (TVE) curve beat-by-beat, the monitoring of which's inter-beat evolution could add significant new data and insight to improve diagnosis and treatment. The method developed uses the clinically available inputs of aortic pressure, heart rate and baseline end-systolic volume (via echocardiography) to determine the outputs of left ventricular pressure, volume and dead space volume, and thus the TVE curve. This approach avoids directly assuming the shape of the TVE curve, allowing more effective capture of intra- and inter-patient variability. Results: The resulting TVE curve was experimentally validated against the TVE curve as derived from experimentally measured left ventricular pressure and volume in animal models, a data set encompassing 46,318 heartbeats across 5 Piétrain pigs. This simulated TVE curve was able to effectively approximate the measured TVE curve, with an overall median absolute error of 11.4% and overall median signed error of -2.5%. Conclusions: The use of clinically available inputs means there is potential for real-time implementation of the method at the patient bedside. Thus the method could be used to provide additional, patient specific information on intra- and inter-beat variation in heart function.

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  • What Does Feminism Want?

    Horbury, Alison (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Like Freud’s famous inquiry ‘what does a woman want?’, this paper asks a similar question of the signifier ‘feminism’ for if one aims to (re)imagine feminism for the new millennium one must first ask: what does Feminism want? This (imperfect) reference to Freud’s question hopes to draw attention to the particular and the universal underpinning the signifier feminism, a slipperiness that works idiosyncratically at the threshold of public and private politics which, though it is perhaps the most unifying aspect of feminism, nevertheless undermines it. To politicize the personal one must question the signifier that comes to universalize an indefinite article for, as I argue in this paper, what ‘a’ woman wants is beneath the bar of what Feminism wants when it is mounted in public discourse. To continue to invest publically in a signifier of personal politics––as Jacqueline Rose advocates (2014)––then, one must rephrase the question: of what does this signifier Feminism speak when it is mounted in public discourse? This paper considers some mechanisms by which this signifier generates and mobilizes desire, fantasy, and phobia in public politics where feminism’s knowledge product covers over or, in Rose’s terms, “sanitizes” those “disturbing insight[s]” (2014: x) of experience, “everything that is darkest, most recalcitrant and unsettling” (2014 xii), in the “furthest limits of conscious and unconscious life” (2014: x). Here, where this signifier constitutes an ideal-ego, its effects are inhibiting. In short, this paper argues that before any future of feminism can be imagined, those occupying a feminist position—discourse, politics, or identity—must ask what their unconscious investment in this signifier is. In Lacanian terms, one must relinquish feminism’s discourse of protest and complete the circuit through the analyst’s discourse to ask: what does a woman want in feminism? What does Feminism want?

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  • Nasty Feminism, Nasty Feminists

    Thomas, Nicol

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The question “what does a woman want?” has been asked by psychoanalysts in the past—particularly by Freud and Lacan—and is a question that has been taken up by feminist scholarship and epistemology. This essay addresses this complex question via both feminist research and enquiry and a Lacanian psychoanalytic praxis. The issue of women’s very speech is crucial, which is a cornerstone element of the feminisms of Spender, Steinem, Hanisch, Irigaray, Cixous, Felski, Jane and Ford. Lacan makes the point that feminine jouissance stands outside the phallic order and thus must be incorporated in the psychoanalytic consideration of what is the sexed position, woman. This essay argues that Lacan’s psychoanalytic considerations have great political and practical import for contemporary feminist practices and epistemology, via the positioning of women’s very speech outside of—but apposite to—a provably violent misogynistic patriarchy.

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  • Feminism in the Logic of Late Capitalism

    Kunkle, Sheila (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    This essay considers how Feminism might become a force for radical change as construed through two perspectives: the Marxist vision of Kathi Weeks and the Hegelian logic of Slavoj Žižek. I begin by enumerating the antinomies of late capitalism and the ways it has subsumed our identities and commodified our social relations. I then elucidate how Weeks’ Marxist utopia (her demands of basic income and less work) require a “hopeful subject” and positive freedom, while Zizek’s Hegelian logic and vision of a communist future require the negativity of freedom, a divided subject, and hopelessness. Weeks’ feminism posits a direct opposition to capitalism, setting boundaries to its external limits, while Zizek’s Hegelian logic would require the reconfiguration of capitalism’s internal limits. Finally, I propose how a feminism geared towards its own extinction might make a Marxian move by way of Hegelian logic, through the consideration of Fredric Jameson’s “An American Utopia.”

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  • “White Women Elected Trump”: Feminism in ‘Dark Times,’ Its Present and Future

    Faulkner, Joanne (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Women-centred social movements are currently undergoing a period of intense self-reflection and -criticism following the election of Donald J. Trump as President, and in the context of the large degree of support he received from white women. This paper analyses the event of the ‘women’s marches’ that took place globally the day following Trump’s presidential inauguration for its significance for the present and future of feminism. The consequence of the marches has been debated both by participants and non-participants, due to the broad range of issues, interests, and demands present at the events. While there was a diversity of participants in the marches, a common criticism from non-participants was that the march was insufficiently political in its goals and manifestation, too novice and too disparate to constitute real political action. This paper responds to this concern and its implications by staging an exchange between Hannah Arendt and Jacques Rancière, in order to clarify the possibilities of movements such as the marches for the future of feminism.

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  • Book Review - Althusser and Theology by Agon Hamza (Ed)

    McGowan, Todd (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Feminism, Finance and the Work of Reproduction

    Daellenbach, Shanti (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    This article begins to think the groundwork for a revolutionary feminist politics in an era shaped by contemporary finance capital and the increasing financialisation daily life. Conceiving of financialisation as a strategic response to a threat that must be brought under capital’s control through reorganising the exploitation of labour-power, it provides a reading of the seemingly abstract sphere of financial circulation as fundamentally dependent upon the very material and primary labour of reproduction. The article undertakes an analysis of how social reproduction is increasingly financialised today, in ways that play on and reinforce the persistently gendered reality of this work for the purpose of financial accumulation and increasing the profitability of labour. From the gendered targeting of financial instruments, to discursive tropes of women’s pathologies and responsibilities in household financial management, financialisation both creates new terrains of reproductive work and deepens households’ and women’s entanglement with financial markets to ensure their survival. Drawing on the critical writings and political strategies of autonomist feminism, this paper argues that women’s reproductive labour is central to the continued ascendancy of finance capital and, consequently, that feminist struggle’s for autonomy, self-valorisation and socialisation of reproduction are central to its destruction. Understanding what finance means to feminism and, in turn, what feminism might mean to finance today is imperative for a relevant contemporary feminist politics and to effective anti-capitalist strategy alike. This begins with a critical re-examination of the emergence of the hierarchical sexual division of labour particular to capital relations and its status in contemporary finance capital.

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  • Tending for Necessity: Reclaiming feminism on the left

    Fielder, Anna (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    In light of the feminist response to the presidential victory of Donald Trump, this piece draws upon the work of critical left thinkers such as Alain Badiou, Nancy Fraser and Fredric Jameson in order to advocate a future for feminism that is based on the radical left. Taking inspiration from Fredric Jameson’s suggestion that History is marked by “the collective struggle to wrest a realm of Freedom from a realm of Necessity” this piece argues for a feminism that does not individualise or commodify people’s relationships with Necessity, but that has as one if its central tenets a collective caring and tending for those inescapable aspects of living. This does not require a move away from contemporary feminist concerns for signification and language. How Necessity is brought (if only partially) into signification and collectively tended for, now constitute vital points of discussion in a left politics that feminists have little choice but to engage with.

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  • Book Review - Capitalism and Desire: The Psychic Cost of Free Markets by Todd McGowan

    Zupancic, Alenka

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The Power of O

    Jöttkandt, Sigi (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Here I propose that a Lacanian feminist undertaking today requires the assertion of two sets of rights: the positive rights of a traditional feminist agenda, together with the rights of the not-all. To illustrate this, I draw on the contemporary political events of Donald Trump's inauguration and the Women's March on Washington.

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  • Notes on Contributors

    Zeiher, Cindy; Grimshaw, Mike

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Book Review - The Trouble With Pleasure: Deleuze and Psychoanalysis by Aaron Schuster

    Crockett, Clayton (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • New Realisms, Materialisms, (Post-)Philosophy and the Possibility for a Feminist Internationalism

    Kolozova, Katerina (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The new forms of feminist realism and materialism could have significant political ramifications that should be owned by feminist scholars and activists as a way to create new possibilities for an internationalist political language and action that would be geographically, economically and in terms of nation-state politics as varied and as multi-centered as possible. Such a new universalism must emerge at the economic and academic margins, move concentrically toward the center seeking to provide the grounds for uncompromising comradeship worldwide. The universe it will establish is one in which power will be measured in materialist or realist terms and its chief categories will also be the most robust ones: economy and the power of the nation-state as the main means of women’s subjugation.

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  • Old and New Constraints and Resistances of Feminism: the Role of Past Experiences in Rethinking of Class, Oppression and Patriarchy

    Toffanin, Tania (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    In this paper, I try to highlight some key issues involving feminism, its potentials and the obstacles it has been facing from the 1970s onwards. I stress the attention of the enduring left-wing patriarchy and its damaging consequences for feminist movements. I point out the need for to recover the past experiences of struggle, with particular reference to Lotta Femminista and the Wage for Housework network to emphasize, the role of black feminism in the practice of intersectionality as a structural point of reference. Also, I underline the need to debate the results of state feminism and women’s activity within organizations. As well as these, I call attention to the need to analyse the system of oppression within a revolutionary project which aims at overcoming both capitalism and patriarchy, as well as the key role that feminism has to play on the elaboration and implementation of this project. In this way, as feminism cannot be a sporadic commitment, women are asked to articulate every day, wherever they are and whatever they do to produce and reproduce subversion.

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  • Book Review - An Insurrectionist Manifesto: Four New Gospels for a Radical Politics by Blanton, Ward, Clayton Crockett, Jeffrey W. Robbins, and Noëlle Vahanian

    McKay, Niall (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Book Review - Capitalism and Desire: The Psychic Cost of Free Markets by Todd McGowan

    Zupancic, Alenka (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Notes on Contributors

    Zeiher, Cindy; Grimshaw, Mike (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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