719 results for University of Canterbury Library, 2007

  • Testing the usability of well scaled mobile maps for consumers

    van Elzakker, C.P.J.M.; van Oosterom, P.J.M.; Delikostidis, I. (2007)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Maps, chaos, and fractals

    Williams, Phillipa (2007)

    Discussion / Working Papers
    University of Canterbury Library

    The behaviour and properties of one-dimensional discrete mappings are explored by writing Matlab code to iterate mappings and draw graphs. Fixed points, periodic orbits, and bifurcations are described and chaos is introduced using the logistic map. Symbolic dynamics are used to show that the doubling map and the logistic map have the properties of chaos. The significance of a period-3 orbit is examined and the concept of universality is introduced. Finally the Cantor Set provides a brief example of the use of iterative processes to generate fractals.

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  • A 3-approximation algorithm for the subtree between phylogenies

    Bordewich, M.; McCartin, C.; Semple, C. (2007)

    Discussion / Working Papers
    University of Canterbury Library

    In this paper, we give a (polynomial-time) 3-approximation algorithm for the rooted subtree prune and regraft distance between two phylogenetic trees. This problem is known to be NP-complete and the best previously known approximation algorithm is a 5-approximation. We also give a faster fixed-parameter algorithm for the rooted subtree prune and regraft distance than was previously known.

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  • Selecting taxa to save or sequence : desirable criteria and a greedy solution

    Bordewich, M.; Rodrigo, A. G.; Semple, C. (2007)

    Discussion / Working Papers
    University of Canterbury Library

    Three desirable properties for any method of selecting a subset of evolutionary units (EUs) for conservation or for genomic sequencing are discussed. These properties are: spread, stability, and applicability. We are motivated by a practical case in which the maximisation of phylogenetic diversity (PD), which has been suggested as a suitable method, appears to lead to counter-intuitive collections of EUs and does not meet these three criteria. We define a simple greedy algorithm (GREEDYMMD) as a close approximation to choosing the subset that maximises the minimum pairwise distance between EUs. This method of selection satisfies our three criteria and may be a useful alternative to PD in certain real world situations. We also show that if distances between EUs are ultrametric, then GREEDYMMD delivers an optimal subset of EUs that maximises both the minimum pairwise distance and the PD. Finally, since GREEDYMMD works with distances and does not require a tree, it is readily applicable to many datasets.

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  • Exact Solution to the Averaging Problem in Cosmology

    Wiltshire, D.L. (2007)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    The exact solution of a two-scale Buchert average of the Einstein equations is derived for an inhomogeneous universe that represents a close approximation to the observed universe. The two scales represent voids, and the bubble walls surrounding them within which clusters of galaxies are located. As described elsewhere [New J. Phys. 9, 377 (2007)], apparent cosmic acceleration can be recognized as a consequence of quasilocal gravitational energy gradients between observers in bound systems and the volume-average position in freely expanding space. With this interpretation, the new solution presented here replaces the Friedmann solutions, in representing the average evolution of a matter-dominated universe without exotic dark energy, while being observationally viable.

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  • In Search of Popular Journalism in New Zealand

    Matheson, D. (2007)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper explores the discourses of popular legitimacy deployed by New Zealand journalists. It studies in particular the ways that journalists reflect upon their relationship with “the people”, through their comments in such forums as trade publications, addresses to readers in the voice of the editor and memoirs. It argues that the dominant journalistic voices in Aotearoa New Zealand provide a narrow and poorly defined set of resources to describe how journalism practice relates to those outside the elite spaces of most public debate or to describe the grounds of journalists’ legitimacy as a set of spokespeople for society. Discourses of “the people” are marked by a discomfort with the category and are rarely politicized, when they are not elided away under competing terms such as community or public. The paper argues that the weakness of a sense of popular legitimacy has consequences for the quality of both journalism and of political and cultural debate in the country.

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  • Cosmic clocks, cosmic variance and cosmic averages

    Wiltshire, D.L. (2007)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    http://stacks.iop.org/1367-2630/9/377

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  • Patman, R. and Rudd, S. (eds.), Sovereignty Under Siege? Globalization and New Zealand, (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005, pp. 234).

    Moses, J. (2007)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    This edited collection is an ambitious but ultimately unsatisfying attempt to examine the impact of globalisation upon the sovereignty of New Zealand. The volume begins with a basic introduction to the issues of sovereignty and globalisation and lays out the rationale for focusing on New Zealand in this context, with the argument that ‘New Zealand’s response to globalization should shed some light on both the intensity and extent of global integration’ and that the ‘New Zealand case study also promises to illuminate the role of the small state in the new global context.’ To these ends, the collection is presented in three parts, the first dealing with ‘Political and Economic Engagement,’ the second with ‘National Identity,’ and the third with ‘Security and Foreign Policy Directions.’

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  • Information Sharing During Emergency Response and Recovery: A Framework for Road Organizations

    Dantas, A.; Seville, E.; Gohil, D. (2007)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Road organizations are involved in a wide range of emergency response and recovery activities. Information sharing is a critical element in deploying road organization resources during such activities. This paper presents an information-sharing framework for road organizations. On the basis of a study of response and recovery activities, information needs were identified and a geographic information system–based information-sharing framework was created. The framework is applied to a desktop case study in the South Island of New Zealand to establish the magnitude of potential benefits. Results indicate that a reduction in time and cost of emergency response activities could be achieved if the conceptual framework was implemented through reduced response times, faster access to relevant information, and therefore enhanced decision making

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  • A MATLAB implementation of elliptic curve cryptography

    Silverwood, Hamish (2007)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    The ultimate purpose of this project has been the implementation in MATLAB of an Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) system, primarily the Elliptic Curve Diffie-Hellman (ECDH) key exchange. We first introduce the fundamentals of Elliptic Curves, over both the real numbers and the integers modulo p where p is prime. Then the theoretical underpinnings of the ECDH system are covered, including a brief look at how this system is broken. Next we develop the individual elements that will be needed in the implementation of ECDH, such as functions for calculating modular square roots and the addition of points on an EC. We then bring these elements together to create a working ECDH program, and discuss the limitations of the MATLAB environment in which it was created. Finally we look at the real world application of ECC and its future in the realm of cryptography.

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  • Fast algorithms for model based therapeutics

    Lawrence, Piers (2007)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    In critical care tight control of glucose has been shown to lead to better clinical outcomes and reductions in length of stay. The need arises to develop new protocols for maintaining tight control of patients' glucose. The current hindrance to developing new protocols is the large amount of computational time and resources that are needed. This paper is based on finding fast analytical based methods for the insulin-glucose model. Exploiting the structure and partial solutions in a subset of the model was the key in finding accurate solutions to the full model. This successfully reduced the computing time compared to the numerical methods used currently by a factor of 6000 whilst introducing minimal error. This will allow new protocols to be rapidly developed leading to better clinical outcomes for patients in critical care.

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  • Integral based identification for physiological models

    MohdNor, NoorHafiz (2007)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    Recently a model-based protocol has been developed for controlling glucose in the Christchurch ICU which has already had a significant clinical impact. A major part of the development involved an integral-based parameter identification method. This paper addresses the importance of an integral formulation for stability in glucose control. The method is compared to a standard derivative based method which is shown to be unstable. The integral method is shown to be highly robust to both modelling and measurement error.

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  • The application of the support vector machine to the classification

    Son, Olivia (2007)


    University of Canterbury Library

    A classification technique, known as Support Vector Machine (SVM) is applied to tobacco data from the SYFT technologies Ltd. The SVM is used to classify illegal from others. Decision tree is performed prior to SVM and these two classification methods are compared by misclassification rate for the accuracy of classification performance.

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  • Resilience Management: A Framework for Assessing and Improving the Resilience of Organisations

    McManus, S.; Seville, E.; Brunsden, D.; Vargo, J. (2007)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    Resilient Organisations Research Report 2007/01

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  • Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFL) - Implications for Distribution Networks

    Watson, N.R.; Scott, T.; Hirsch, S. (2007)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    The desire to reduce electrical loading by using energy efficient lighting has resulted in a high level of interest in replacing conventional incandescent lamps with Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFL). CFLs are however, a nonlinear load hence inject harmonics into the electrical network. The CFL use electronic ballasts and the design of these have an enormous impact on the electrical performance of the CFL. In the past the harmonics injected into the network by CFLs has been ignored as each is very small as the typically CFL is only 20 Watts. However if widespread adoption of CFLs occurs the combined effect of all these small sources can be just as detrimental as one large source, and is even harder to mitigate due to their distributed nature. This paper presents the results of a study to quantify the effect widespread adoption of CFLs will have on a typical distribution network. The two aspects investigated were harmonic distortion and system losses.

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  • Teaching as an Ethical and Political Process: A Freirean Perspective

    Roberts, P. (2007)

    Oral Presentations
    University of Canterbury Library

    Teaching is often conceived in terms of methods and skills. When different approaches to teaching are discussed, the focus is commonly on teaching techniques; on the methods believed to be most effective in enabling students to learn. It is not always clear what students are expected to learn, but hopes of improved performance on standardised tests of student achievement usually figure prominently in such discussions. Considerable resources are devoted to researching and implementing schemes for producing better methods and better teaching. The hope is that not only individual test scores but national performances in surveys of international educational achievement (e.g., comparisons between OECD countries) will be boosted as a result of this investment of time, money and effort. The assumption is that if we change the methods, or ‘fix’ the teacher, or increase the funding, some of our most important educational problems will be solved. Teaching, on this view, becomes a largely technical process. It is taken as given that if we ‘get the methods right’ – and these may be not only methods of teaching, but also of training teachers – all will be well. This chapter offers an alternative view – one based on the work of the Brazilian educationist Paulo Freire. Freire was one of the most influential educationists of twentieth century, and his work continues to attract attention across the globe today. Freire argued that teaching is never merely about skills and methods. From a Freirean perspective, both teaching and learning are always non-neutral, political and ethical processes. For Freire, methods and skills are not unimportant, but their role in teaching must be considered in relation to a broader understanding of human beings and the world. The first part of this chapter outlines key elements of Freire’s educational philosophy, while the second considers some of the implications of Freirean theory for teacher education and teaching practice. The chapter concludes with brief reflections on strengths and weaknesses in Freire’s work, and with some final comments on the significance of teaching in changing lives.

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  • Conversations about Writing: The journey from practitioner to writer

    Maidment, J.; Milner, V. (2007)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    The following contribution is written as a series of letters which reflect the process of email communication between the two authors. While this genre is not one normally used in an academic journal, for the purpose of conveying the iterative nature of this unfolding communication the letter format has been retained. Numerical referencing has been used in this work to minimise the interruption of in-text author/date referencing in the letter communications.

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  • An investigation of IQ movement in early childhood

    Henley, Lisa (2007)


    University of Canterbury Library

    The aim of this work is to investigate whether there is movement over time in early childhood IQ, and if so whether this movement differs between pre-term and full term children. Movement was indeed observed for both pre-term and full term children, however the 'type' of movement differed significantly between pre-term and full term children only for those categorised as normal. The analysis also examines the factors which may influence the movement. Various techniques are employed to contend with issues including small sample sizes, aligning independent IQ measurement scales and variable selection.

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  • Constructive approximation theory

    Hendtlass, Matthew (2007)


    University of Canterbury Library

    We consider the fundamental Theorem of Approximation Theory from a constructive viewpoint, revealing that the theorem itself is fundamentally non-constructive. We subsequently present a development of a constructive alternative to the Fundamental Theorem, under the hypothesis that there is at most one best approximation in our linear space. Basic applications of this theorem are discussed and brief mention made regarding alternative additions to the hypothesis of the Fundamental Theorem.

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  • Fibonacci numbers and some applications to digital image scrambling

    Williams, Benjamin (2007)


    University of Canterbury Library

    An analysis of some recently proposed methods of digital image scrambling that use Fibonacci numbers. This report describes the mathematics required to understand why these methods work.

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