29 results for University of Otago, Book item

  • Daniel Spoerri's Carnival of Animals

    Novero, Cecilia (2012)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    This innovative, accessible, and thorough collection addresses an admirable range of historical and geographical contexts to demonstrate that the human relationship with other species is complex and overdetermined, and that human systems of knowledge and representation are crucial for negotiating this uneven terrain. An essential teaching text, Gorgeous Beasts will find a welcome home in the HAS classrooms of many disciplines.” —Sherryl Vint, author of Bodies of Tomorrow: Technology, Subjectivity, Science Fiction “With a multidisciplinary approach combining historical studies and the study of visual representations, with a period focus centered on the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries but also reaching back to the Renaissance and forward to contemporary works, and with contributions from some of the most prominent and thought-provoking scholars in the field of animal studies, Gorgeous Beasts energetically advances the current conversation about the human uses of nonhuman animals. Several essays investigate and seek to remedy the lack of representation involved in past and present silences concerning the slaughter of animals, while others investigate the problematic representations of animals as creatures of the wild, objects of scientific study, trophies, or biomass to be harvested. The attention paid to the contemporary artists Daniel Spoerri and Mark Dion makes explicit the links between the historical analyses and our current situation. Raising provocative and important questions, this volume sets the terms for future studies of the representation of other animals by humans.” —Frank Palmeri, University of Miami “This book introduces us to gorgeous beasts—creatures we yearn for, treasure, misunderstand, and mistreat. Enclosure-endangered Atlantic codfish, bloodhounds unleashed on the Maroon uprisings in Jamaica, taxidermied elephants that conferred secondhand majesty on trophy hunters, slither-painting snakes, even dog-skin gloves and civet-scented perfumes (those animal-made objects): all testify to our human co-construction of, with, and by animals. In the book’s lush illustrations, the visual representation of animals has equal footing with their material and economic histories, and the result is a thought-provoking and sense-igniting treat.” —Susan Merrill Squier, author of Poultry Science, Chicken Culture: A Partial Alphabet and Liminal Lives: Imagining the Human at the Frontiers of Biomedicine “Gorgeous Beasts is a gorgeous book. As the essays revel in the physicality of animal bodies in order to reveal why and how animals matter in history and art, so the volume celebrates the physical book. Extensively illustrated, expertly designed, and printed on sumptuous paper, it embodies the best of the exhibition catalogue and the scholarly text. Like a finely curated art exhibit, it speaks to the myriad and contradictory ways that animals matter through individual works that are a pleasure to behold, read, and contemplate.” —Amy Nelson, American Historical Review “Edited by Joan B. Landes, Paula Young Lee, and Paul Youngquist, Gorgeous Beasts brings together nine essays by some of the most sophisticated voices within animal studies to explore the histories and desires shaping human encounters with other animals, both alive and dead. . . . Gorgeous Beasts asks all the right questions. Its animal bodies are provocative, unpredictable, and potent. Meticulously researched and eloquently argued with clear, accessible language, the essays incite a knowing that grows beyond the page and into our daily lives with other animals.” —Rachel Poliquin, Humanimalia “The essays in this book explore the important, sometimes ambiguous roles that animals play in human culture.” —E. K. Mix, Choice

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  • Global Regulation of Nanotechnologies and Their Products in Medicine

    Moore, Jennifer (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Nanotechnology, an emerging technology, is creating innovative medicinal products for clinical use. The convergence of nanotechnologies with medicine is predicted to transform the health care sector, particularly pharmaceutical development. Jurisdictions, such as the European Union, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, have witnessed the launch of medical products containing nanomaterials. Many of the nanomedicines on the market, in clinical testing, or under regulatory review, promise to improve existing products and treat diseases more effectively. The purposes of this chapter are to (a) describe nanotechnology, in particular, its clinical applications; (b) analyze the application of medical products regulation in several jurisdictions (the European Union, United States, Australia, and New Zealand); and (c) assess the adequacy of this law for managing the potential risks posed by nanomedicines. There are gaps in the public health/health science evidence about the risks associated with nanomedicines, and there is concern that the novel properties of some nanomedicines will bring unforeseen human and environmental health and safety risks. Analysts project that, by 2014, the market for medical products containing nanomaterials will be US$18 billion per year. Given the predicted market for nanomedicines, and the growing evidence of their potential risks, it is important to have adequate regulation of these products to prevent adverse public health outcomes. Regulators and clinicians will need to consider the risks posed by some nanomedicines against the potential benefits to patients who are prescribed these products.

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  • The Impact of Therapeutic Jurisprudence on the New Zealand Coronial Jurisdiction

    Moore, Jennifer (2015)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Coroners in New Zealand can make recommendations that may reduce the chances of occurrence of similar deaths in the future. Coronial recommendations can have pro-therapeutic outcomes. The recommendations hold therapeutic promise for bereaved families by refocusing families towards prevention of similar deaths. However, when coroners' recommendations are not implemented, this has counter-therapeutic outcomes for the community who deserve remedial action, and for families who hoped for change. This chapter uses evidence from New Zealand's first empirical study of coroners' recommendations. An empirical approach is taken because therapeutic jurisprudence is concerned with assessing the law's impact on people, and the study of impacts often requires data about people's experiences of legal processes.

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  • Position and direction finding for exploration and mapping

    Goodwin, David (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Work Related Musculoskeletal Pain and It’s Management

    McBride, David; Harcombe, Helen (2012-10)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    This is an ongoing project, your comments are welcome! david.mcbride@otago.ac.nz

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  • Using Insights from Interactions Research to Improve Policy and Practice in Early Childhood Education

    Gunn, Alexandra C. (2017)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Uncorrected, pre-publication proof.

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  • Shaping gender relations in early childhood education: Children's interactions and learning about gender

    Gunn, Alexandra C. (2017)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    There are many theories about how one gets their gender and what this may mean for how people live their lives. Developmental texts typically present a range of psychological theories for sex differences, gender, or sex stereotyping and are replete with explanations for why children do the gendered things they do. In the West and until the late twentieth century and the rise of feminism, psychologists regarded the development of quite strictly governed gender roles and beliefs in children as a healthy expression of the so-called normal gender development. With renewed interest in the study of genders however and an increased awareness that in fact, at the extremes of the so-called gender appropriateness, social expectations are not necessarily healthy and supportive of an individual’s development, views on concepts of gender roles and gender development have begun to change. A diversity of explanations for why children do their gender the ways they do now sits alongside each other and gives rise to people’s conceptions of gender and its development in early childhood.

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  • Practice and Performance as Research in the Arts

    (2011)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Building professionals and elevating the profession? The work of university-based teacher educators in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Berg, David. A. G.; Gunn, Alexandra C.; Hill, M. F.; Haigh, M. (2017)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Pre-Publication PROOF

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  • The spectre of standards in Aotearoa New Zealand early childhood education and care.

    Gunn, Alexandra C.; Gasson, N. Ruth (2017-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Please do not cite - this version of the chapter is an uncorrected proof.

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  • Children's Use of Objects in Their Storytelling

    Bateman, A; Carr, M; Gunn, Alexandra C. (2017)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Uncorrected Pre-Publication Proof

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  • Land Tenure: The Wide View

    Goodwin, David (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Ethics and practice: Australian and New Zealand conservation contexts

    Smith, Catherine Ann; Scott, Marcelle (2009-01)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • The Logic of Terror

    Hokowhitu, Brendan (2008)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Permission kindly granted to reproduce this chapter from Huia Publishers.

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  • Graphical displays in eco-feedback: a cognitive approach

    Ford, Rebecca; Karlin, Beth (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Psychological research indicates that the provision of feedback is a key element in reinforcing and/or changing behavior, and whilst results from empirical studies on eco-feedback are positive, variation in findings suggests that its effectiveness may depend on both what information is provided and how it is presented. The design of graphical displays is an important component, but past display research has been primarily qualitative and exploratory. This paper introduces and tests a cognitive model of visual information processing applied to eco-feedback to evaluate differences in interpretation and preference between images. Participants were shown images that varied by number of data points as well as display features and were asked to interpret the images and report on image usability. Findings support the cognitive model, suggesting that eco-feedback displays appear to be more successful when they: (1) contain fewer data points; (2) employ data chunking; and/or (3) include pictures.

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  • Assessing movement coordination

    Lamb, Peter; Bartlett, Roger (2017-12)

    Book item
    University of Otago

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  • The potential of queer theorising in early childhood education: Disrupting heteronormativity and practising for inclusion

    Gunn, Alexandra C. (2015)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Bear Images: Human Performativity and Animal Touch in Grizzly Man

    Novero, Cecilia (2015-12)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Animal Life and the Moving Image is the first collection of essays to offer a sustained focus on the relations between screen cultures and non-human animals. The volume brings together some of the most important and influential writers working on the non-human animal's significance for cultures and theories of the moving image. It offers innovative analyses of the representation of animals across a wide range of documentary, fiction, mainstream and avant-garde practices, from early cinema to contemporary user-generated media. Individual chapters consider King Kong, The Birds, The Misfits, The Cove, Grizzly Man and Microcosmos, the work of Sergei Eisenstein, Robert Bresson, Malcolm Le Grice, Peter Greenaway, Carolee Schneemann and Isabella Rossellini, and YouTube stars Christian the lion and Maru the cat.

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  • Grandparents who Care for Grandchildren

    Henaghan, Mark (2014)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Both in New Zealand and abroad, a social trend is emerging of grandparents taking on the responsibility of parenting their grandchildren. This chapter examines the different ways in which grandparents can come to be legally involved in their grandchildren’s lives and their position under New Zealand’s legislative and common law regimes. By way of contrast, the somewhat different position of grandparents in the United States is analysed with reference to the United States Supreme Court decision of Troxel v Granville. The chapter also discusses the fundamental importance of children’s voices and concludes with an examination of the practical support available to grandparents who find themselves raising their grandchildren.

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  • Neuroscience and the Law in New Zealand

    Henaghan, Mark; Rouch, Kate (2012)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    The New Zealand Court of Appeal has rejected evidence of neuroimaging to help juries assess the capacity of the accused in an insanity plea. This chapter says the Court of Appeal was right to do so because neuroimaging should not replace the role of the jury. The chapter explains; that neuroscience will help us better understand how the brain functions and what relationship there is between that functioning and how we make decisions. The chapter concludes that neuroscience will be helpful for insight into the human condition but cannot replace the moral choices of what we think is right or wrong or whether we should be culpable or should not be.

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