133 results for University of Otago, Conference item

  • GREEN Grid Choice Modelling preliminary report

    Williams, John Richard (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

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  • Characterising relational view updates using relative information capacity

    Stanger, Nigel (2017-01)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    This item includes a version that corrects to some minor errata that appeared in the published version.

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  • The preservation of Māori textiles: Collaboration, research and cultural meaning.

    Smith, Catherine Ann; Te Kanawa, Kahutoi; White, Moira (2011)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Māori artefacts discovered in 1895 at Puketoi Station, Otago, South Island New Zealand, were re-examined using multiple methods to gather information of relevance and meaning to contemporary Māori culture. This paper discusses aspects of an interdisciplinary project including conservation treatment, plant material identification and examination of textile structure and details of cultural information thus uncovered. One artefact, the pukoro kete, or tutu-berry bag, is used as a case study to illustrate how knowledge uncovered about past material culture in collaboration with traditional owners can influence contemporary cultural practice and aid in affirmation of distinctive cultural identity.

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  • Pre-European Maori textiles from South Island New Zealand

    Smith, Catherine Ann; Laing, Raechel M; Walter, Richard (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Relating colour, chemical and physical characteristics of artificially light-aged New Zealand plant fibres

    Lowe, Bronwyn J; Smith, Catherine A; Gordon, Keith C; Hanton, Lyall R; Ford, Bruce; Korsten, Annika; Fraser, Sara J; Lomax, Bethany A (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Light ageing of naturally-dyed plant fibres can cause colour change, alteration of molecular bonds within the fibre structure and loss of mechanical integrity. Lighting guidelines seek to protect artefacts by limiting light exposure, for example by estimating the lux hours likely to cause colour change of “one just noticeable fade” (1JNF). However the extent of associated molecular or mechanical damage is rarely simultaneously assessed. This paper reports a pilot study investigating the effects of accelerated light ageing on muka (fibre extracted from the leaves of Phormium tenax), the most common fibre used in Māori textiles. Non-dyed and dyed muka were artificially light-aged and micro-faded to ascertain exposure resulting in 1JNF. Raman microscopy and tensile testing of individual fibres from the same samples were used to explore correlations among fading, molecular change and mechanical properties.

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  • Identifying the fundamental elements of learning in a simulated clinical setting using a Delphi technique.

    Young, Jessica; Williamson, Martyn; Daniel, Ben; Ross, Jim; Egan, Tony (2017-06)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Identifying fundamental elements of learning in a simulated clinical setting using a Delphi technique. Name: Jessica Young1, Martyn Williamson1, Ben Daniel Motidyang2, Jim Ross1, Tony Egan1 Origin: 1University of Otago, Dunedin School of Medicine, Dunedin, New Zealand 2University of Otago, Higher Education Development Centre, Dunedin, New Zealand Introduction/background: The Safe and Effective Clinical Outcomes (SECO) clinic simulation was designed to allow medical students to learn from adopting the doctor role in a high fidelity environment. This study was prompted by the depth of students’ reflections on their learning experiences in the SECO clinic. The data for the analysis comprise the 55 codes generated from a thematic analysis of 50% of all 4th year medical students’ reflective essays in 2011, 2012 (n=77). Aim/objectives: To use an online consensus Delphi technique to validate the student learning themes derived from previous SECO research. Methods: Eleven international faculty were provided with code definitions and asked to assign the codes to the most appropriate of the six original themes or to suggest new themes. We defined consensus as more than 50% of participants agreeing on the assignation. The second round required participants to indicate if they agreed or disagreed that the codes were a good fit within each theme. Any new themes were included in round two. Results: There was 100% agreement on the six original themes - professional identity, self-awareness, outcomes/safe practices, learning setting, clinical ability, relationships – and majority agreement on the suggested theme engagement/motivation. Discussion The themes could be regarded as educational outcomes achievable in a clinical setting or simulation. The codes under each theme could be thought about as enablers, definers or triggers for the outcome. We are interested in how these can be operationalised in other settings? Conclusions: The themes appear to us to represent some fundamentals of clinical learning.

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  • Using new technologies to capture infant sleep: protocol for the BabyCam pilot study

    Harrex, Harriet; Taylor, Rachael; Smith, Claire; Galland, Barbara (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

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  • Re-examining conservation precepts; implications for conservation education

    Scott, Marcelle; Smith, Catherine Ann (2011)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    In recognising a changing social future, this paper posits that the future relevance and sustainability of conservation is dependent on a re-evaluation of our professional pre-cepts, ethics, and working practices to more fully embrace and reflect interdisciplinary and cross-cultural ways of working. It argues that conservators must locate our practice within overarching global issues of poverty, human rights, ethics, climate change and sus-tainability. The implications for conservation pedagogy are examined, and the benefits of collaboration between universities and in-dustry partners are discussed.

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  • Micro-computed tomography for plant identification in artefacts

    Smith, Catherine Ann; Lowe, Bronwyn J.; McNoughton, Andrew (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    In New Zealand the identification of materials of construction of Māori textiles has important cultural and legal connotations. However the identification of aged and processed plant material in artefacts is difficult, compounded by the need for use of nondestructive analytical methods. This paper will discuss the application, efficacy and implications of a new method that uses micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) together with an identification key as evaluative criteria for the identification of plant material in artefacts. Case studies using Māori textiles will show how plant identification using microCT can aid in ascribing cultural context to artefacts with unknown provenance, and aid in rediscovery of cultural knowledge about plant use for artefact production.

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  • On the Multi-GNSS RTK Positioning Performance in New Zealand

    Odolinski, Robert; Denys, Paul (2015-07-14)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    http://www.ignss.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=%2fKghNFHXVoI%3d&tabid=147&mid=558&forcedownload=true

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  • Context identification of sentences in related work sections using a conditional random field: towards intelligent digital libraries

    Angrosh, M. A.; Cranefield, Stephen; Stanger, Nigel (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Identification of contexts associated with sentences is becoming increasingly necessary for developing intelligent information retrieval systems. This article describes a supervised learning mechanism employing a conditional random field (CRF) for context identification and sentence classification. Specifically, we focus on sentences in related work sections in research articles. Based on a generic rhetorical pattern, a framework for modelling the sequential flow in these sections is proposed. Adopting a generalization strategy, each of these sentences is transformed into a set of features, which forms our dataset. We distinguish between two kinds of features for each of these sentences viz., citation features and sentence features. While an overall accuracy of 96.51% is achieved by using a combination of both citation and sentence features, the use of sentence features alone yields an accuracy of 93.22%. The results also show F-Scores ranging from 0.99 to 0.90 for various classes indicating the robustness of our application.

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  • Being open: timely access to NZCYES publications

    Gallagher, Sarah; Duncanson, Mavis; Simpson, Jean (2016-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Please add to the NZCYES collection

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  • Constipation: A commonly costly complex condition

    Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Adams, Judith; Gallagher, Sarah; Simpson, Jean (2016-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Please add to the NZCYES collection

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  • What's for dinner? Relative and absolute differences in food prices

    Duncanson, Mavis; Boston, Grace; Parnell, Winsome; Simpson, Jean (2016-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

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  • Communal land tenure: can policy planning for the future be improved?

    Goodwin, David (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    In developing Geomatics for Africa, communal land tenure must be among the most intractable of the issues faced. This paper seeks insights into likely communal land policy priorities in Southern Africa by contrasting issues in Zimbabwe with those of New Zealand, whose colonisation process unfolded approximately half a century earlier. Beginning with a background historical summary of the respective countries, the paper goes on to review their current communal tenure status and concludes that the comparison may be helpful at least in identifying issues to be aware of. In particular, finetuning of succession laws is likely to be an area that merits close attention, and whether state social security is ever able to deliver security comparable with kinship groups. As communal land declines in pre-eminence in the survival equation it will likely increase in symbolic importance, which could bring in its train issues such as higher accommodation densities on communal land to which people have connection. Clear thinking is needed on whether particular portions of communal land with special cultural significance (for example, graveyards and homesteads) could best be managed by a model that optimises cultural rather than productive use.

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  • Between the Lines: the spirit behind land agreements

    Goodwin, David; Strack, Mick (2009)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Land agreements negotiated between British authorities and indigenous groups were part and parcel of colonial expansion. Although current interpretations of the historical agreements which formed the basis for European settlement and rights in land acknowledge that a variety of forms of evidence (written, numerical, verbal and pictorial) are admissible in law, and generally recognise that the spirit of an agreement is paramount, special difficulties (principally those of culture and language) are associated with getting to the heart of such agreements. Typically, the written words of legal texts have been scrutinised minutely, but forms of evidence other than the written words have been neglected. This paper compares the unwritten evidence for treaties and concessions in three countries, namely Canada, New Zealand and Zimbabwe. Examples include wampum belts in Canada, and surviving verbal synopses of written documents, for example explanations by missionary translators, which were often couched in figurative or metaphorical language and, at the time, may have carried considerable weight. Despite agreements being negotiated verbally, the official version is generally the written document with appended signatures or written marks. From an indigenous point of view, the verbal agreement often carries greater weight, especially when ratified by some form of cultural protocol, for example smoking a pipe of peace. Failure to recognise such verbal covenants and protocols has at times led to misunderstandings about the spirit of land agreements. The paper concludes that legal processes today not only need to be cognisant of written law but should also pay greater attention to unwritten forms of evidence. In particular, imagery resorted to at the time of negotiation has proved itself pithy, well suited to capturing the essence of negotiating points, and capable of providing enduring mental images that should rightly be drawn on to colour legal interpretation today.

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  • Trends and age profile of 0–24 year olds hospitalised with gastroenteritis

    Oben, Glenda; Simpson, Jean (2015-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Background Hospitalisations for gastroenteritis have been increasing internationally. New Zealand rates were 6.0 per 1,000 0–14 year olds in 2006–2010. Yet hospitalisation for gastroenteritis is potentially avoidable. For example, rotavirus is one of the main causes of gastroenteritis hospitalisation of under 5 year olds. In New Zealand, rotavirus accounted for 1 in 52 children being hospitalised before they were three years. The introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in the US reduced the hospitalisation rate of children. Aim To determine overall and age-specific rates of gastroenteritis hospitalisation of 0–24 year olds in New Zealand and identify the ages at greater risk. Methods A retrospective analysis of acute and semi-acute in-patient hospitalisations of 0–24 years with a primary diagnosis of gastroenteritis extracted, for the period 2000–2014, from the National Minimum Dataset. Results During 2000–2014, the gastroenteritis hospitalisation rate increased from 3.6 per 1,000 0–24 year olds (n=5,028) in 2000 to 5.3 per 1,000 (n=8,151) in 2014. The highest rates were for 0–4 year olds, and in particular those under two years of age. Non-specific gastroenteritis (45.7%), viral enteritis (32.9%), and nausea and vomiting (presumed non-infectious; 15.5%) were the predominant forms of gastroenteritis diagnosed as the reason for hospitalisation. Those aged under one year had the highest hospitalisation rates for the various forms of gastroenteritis, with the exception of rotavirus where the highest rates were for one year olds. Conclusion In New Zealand, hospitalisation rates of gastroenteritis have been increasing since 2000, particularly for 0–4 year olds. The high rates for those under two years is consistent with other research. The highest hospitalisation rates were associated with non-specific diagnoses, particularly notable within viral diagnoses, where‘other viral enteritis’ increased while the rotavirus and norovirus rates appeared stable.

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  • Prevalence of congenital anomalies typically requiring surgery in New Zealand

    Oben, Glenda; Craig, Elizabeth; Gardner, R. Mac (2014-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Background: The indicator “congenital anomalies typically requiring surgery” (CARS) has not previously been documented for New Zealand, yet such anomalies place considerable burden on families and the health sector, for example, from lengthy stays in hospital or high fiscal costs. If treated with cost-effective surgical procedures, children with these anomalies have an improved long-term prognosis. This study describes the prevalence of CARS among total births (livebirths and fetal deaths) in New Zealand for the years 2000–2011. Methods: Information held in the National Minimum Dataset and the National Mortality Collection was used to identify cases of CARS. The selection comprised babies born live in hospital or fetal deaths with an ICD-10-AM diagnosis of: craniosynostosis, gastroschisis, omphalocele, severe congenital heart disease, digestive system malformations, or orofacial cleft. These anomalies were defined by EUROCAT (European network for the surveillance of congenital anomalies) for having a high pregnancy survival rate and a high requirement for surgery before the age of one year. Results: The birth prevalence of CARS was 4.11 per 1,000 births for 2000–2011. The most common CARS were orofacial clefts, severe congenital heart disease, and digestive malformations. The temporal trend was essentially stable for CARS, and only gastroschisis was significantly higher in 2011 than in 2000. Conclusion: The prevalence of CARS in New Zealand is comparable to rates observed for the English EUROCAT registers; however, the stable trend contrasts to the decreases seen for Europe. The requirement for paediatric surgical services is not presently monitored for New Zealand. This study highlights the continued need for these services; in particular, the increasing need for urgent post-delivery surgery for babies born with gastroschisis. This study reports CARS as diagnosed at birth, and consequently may underestimate prevalence. Extension of the indicator criteria from birth to diagnosis up to one year of age, and identification of terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly, warrant further investigation.

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  • Libraries and wellbeing in post-earthquake Christchurch

    Gallagher, Sarah K.J.; Adams, Andrew; Howard, Anna; Robertson, Donna; Reynolds, Ryan; Winn, Coralie (2013-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    References are available in a separate document.

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  • Bayesean Analysis as a Predictor of outcome rate.

    Gale, Christopher; Glue, Paul; Gallagher, Sarah; Gray, Andrew (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Attaching the electronic copy of the abstract book.

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