1,956 results for University of Otago, Doctoral

  • Evolution Made Visible: The Worlds of Thomas Jeffery Parker (1850-1897) the Noted New Zealand Zoologist

    Crane, Rosemary Helen Beatrice (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    A biographical approach to the working life of Thomas Jeffery Parker FRS (1850-1897) provides scope for an in-depth investigation of how zoological knowledge became visible in late-nineteenth century New Zealand. A noted zoologist, Parker arrived in Dunedin in 1880 to a joint appointment as Professor of Biology in the University of Otago and Curator of the Museum. He had spent eight years working as demonstrator in Thomas Henry Huxley’s (1825-1890) laboratory in London. He brought with him a conviction that evolution provided the fundamental organising principle of biology. Once in Dunedin he set about making evolution visible. This study examines the various facets of Parker’s work that achieved this goal. I explore the lively debates arising from the public lectures he gave, in which he promoted evolution. In Dunedin, founded by Scottish Free Church Presbyterians in 1848, public interest in science-and-religion remained high throughout the late-nineteenth century. This study suggests that Parker’s own religious sensibilities lay between the agnosticism of Huxley and the faith of his Wesleyan father, the anatomist William Kitchen Parker (1823-1890). I also investigate Parker’s role in disseminating popular versions of biology, from the podium and through articles, to various audiences. His roles in the sociable side of scientific activities included organizing exhibits for conversaziones and international exhibitions. Parker’s efforts are placed within the context of Dunedin’s vibrant rational entertainment scene. Parker exchanged, bought, sold and collected specimens for the Otago University Museum in order to provide a comprehensive teaching collection. I appraise Parker’s previously little-understood role in museum collection building and explore his material practices in creating objects and their display according to evolutionary principles. Parker’s embryological studies of kiwi and phylogeny of the moa formed a major contribution to New Zealand biology. Methodologically speaking, he followed a traditional path of comparative anatomy. A close-reading of his more than forty papers of technically dense work reveal a conservative mind and a dedication to developmental morphology. Aware of changing epistemologies, he incorporated a statistical approach to his analyses. In this study, I suggest Parker created knowledge through drawing. Analysis of his illustrations reveals his concern with clear exposition. I show how the he used illustrations as part of the process of visual communication not simply as an adjunct. Generations of students learnt zoology using Parker’s system of ‘types’ a pedagogy he inherited from Huxley. They assimilated evolutionary principles via A Textbook of Zoology, which organized the animal kingdom in a typically late-nineteenth century progressive fashion. This two-volume book, co-authored with William Aitcheson Haswell (1854-1925) in Sydney and published posthumously, remains in print. An analysis of its creation shows how disciplinary shifts within zoology were fixed to the page. This study also uses Parker to explore wider concerns in the history of science. These include praxis and materiality, the popularization of science, the rise of the learned journal and broader aspects of print culture, and the geographic location of knowledge creation.

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  • Effect of alcohol exposure in early gestation on brain development

    Li, Yuhong (2005)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), caused by maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy, has been extensively studied in the human. Animal studies show that alcohol exposure during very early development may result in severe brain damage, often incompatible with a postnatal life. However, for surviving offspring it is unknown whether they suffer long term brain damage. The final assembly of the mature brain results from a controlled balance between proliferation of glial and neuronal precursors and programmed cell death. The overall aim of the current study was to use a physiologically relevant mouse model to assess the acute and long-term effects of binge alcohol exposure on the early embryo, to simulate human pregnancy at the third week of gestation when pregnancy may be undetected. A number of paradigms were used to assess the acute dose-response effect, the blood alcohol concentration (BAC) profile and the extent of cell death following alcohol exposure on gestational day (G) 7.5. The exposure paradigms were single binge IG6.5, IG4.5, IP4.5, or an extended binge IG4.5+, IG3.0+. Two control groups were Con6.5 and Con4.5+. Acute cell death was determined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), activated caspase-3 staining, and transmission electron microscopy. Cell proliferation was investigated using S-phase immuno-labeling, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) birthdating and immuno-detection (BrdU/anti-BrdU). The long-term effects were investigated at G18.5 and postnatal day (PN) 60. Unbiased stereological methods were used to assess the effect of ethanol exposure at G7.5 on neocortical volume, cell number and density of neurons, glial cells, and capillary cells at PN60. The first principal finding of the present study was that binge ethanol exposure during gastrulation resulted in acute apoptotic cell death in the ectoderm of the mouse embryo. Cell death was dependent on both peak BAC and the duration of elevated BAC. Significant increased cell death (TUNEL labeling) was observed in groups IG6.5 (9.43 ± 2.08%) and IG4.5+ (8.97 ± 2.12%) compared with control groups Con6.5 (2.14 ± 0.09%) and Con4.5+ (2.81 ± 0.36%). There was no significant increased cell death in ethanol exposed groups IG4.5 (3.43 ± 0.45%), IP4.5 (3.68 ± 0.67%), or IG3.0+ (1.72 ± 0.24%). TEM analysis revealed that cell death exhibited characteristics of the apoptotic pathway. The second principal finding of the present study was that binge ethanol exposure during gastrulation resulted in acute arrested proliferation in the ectoderm of the mouse embryo. The S-phase proliferation was significantly decreased within the whole ectoderm in the ethanol exposed group IG6.5 (45.58 ± 2.34%) compared with control group Con6.5 (62.08 ± 3.11%). The third principal finding of the present study was that binge ethanol exposure during gastrulation induced the long term effect of laminate disorganization in the neocortex. The incidence of abnormal lamination was 87.5% in IG6.5 compared with 16.7% in IG3.0+ and 14.3% in Con6.5. Although ethanol exposure increased embryonic reabsorption, decreased litter size, and increased abnormal offspring, neocortical volume, and the total number of neurons, glial cells, and capillary cells was not affected. The total number (10⁶) of neurons, glial cells, and endothelial cells respectively was 12.221 ± 0.436, 4.865 ± 0.167, and 2.874 ± 0.234 in IG6.5; 11.987 ± 0.416, 4.942 ± 0.133, and 2.922 ± 0.130 in IG3.0+; and 11.806 ± 0.368, 5.166 ± 0.267, and 3.284 ± 0.217 in controls, at PN60. These results provide important information pertinent to fetal outcome for those women who drink heavily in early pregnancy. The results also demonstrate the importance of the pattern of ethanol exposure and blood alcohol concentration in determining the magnitude of ethanol's teratogenic impact. Ethanol exposure on G7.5 that resulted in a high transient BAC, induced disorganized neocortical lamination, indicative of a permanent structural change. This disruption may result in altered neocortical function and requires further investigation.

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  • Synthesis and characterisation of poly(acrylic acid) microspheres containing β-cyclodextrin

    Bibby, David C. (1999)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xviii, 160 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "February 1999"

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  • Analysis of fungal inteins

    Bokor, Annika Anna Maria (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xxvi, 298 leaves :col. ill ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Biochemistry. "November 1, 2010"

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  • Self-Regulation During A Reading-To-Write Task: A Sociocultural Theory-Based Investigation

    Wall, Bunjong (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Most composition studies focus on students’ writing processes and written products without integrating reading into their research activities. More recently, researchers have acknowledged the reciprocal reading-writing relationship and begun to examine reading-to-write or discourse synthesis processes. Research shows that discourse synthesis is cognitively demanding and that most second language writers lack linguistic, mental, and sociocultural resources to perform this task effectively. Existing studies have not emphasised the role of self-directed speech as a self-regulatory strategy while students read multiple texts in order to write. This thesis addresses this gap in the literature. Informed by sociocultural theoretical notions that cognition is socially mediated and that speech is instrumental in learning and development, this qualitative multiple-case-studies thesis examined how five Thai EFL tertiary students applied their knowledge and skills, following explicit concept-based instruction on discourse synthesis, textual coherence, and argumentation. The researcher designed and delivered a four-week intervention in which the learning concepts, materials, and verbalisation were instrumental in promoting conceptual understanding and reading-to-write performance. Explicitly taught verbalisation or self-directed speech, together with learning materials specifically designed as schemes for task orientation, was a key for self-regulation as participants read multiple texts in order to compose an argument essay. The study adopted an activity theoretical framework and microgenetic analysis. The analysis aimed to describe the participants as social beings and to outline their self-regulation as it unfolded during a mediated reading-to-write activity. Data from a pre-task questionnaire on strategy use and from a post-task written self-reflection form together with video-recorded data during the end-of-intervention discourse synthesis task and interview data were triangulated to examine how reading-to-write activities were mediated and regulated. Findings were organised around four main themes: participants as readers and writers of English, essay argument structure, microgenetic findings of unfolding self-regulatory behaviour during the discourse synthesis activity, and developmental gains as perceived by the participants during concept-based instruction. The findings in this study show that participants’ reading and writing difficulties and argumentation were, in part, shaped by the social, historical and cultural factors in the Thai EFL context, and that participants’ strategic application of verbalisation and learning materials mediated their developmental changes and self-regulation. During the discourse synthesis task, participants used self-directed speech as a strategy and demonstrated varying degrees of self-regulation over various task aspects. Successful task completion indicated purposeful mediated learning with strong orientation towards the task, based on conceptual understanding, specific goals, and voluntary inclusion of learning materials as psychological tools. All participants reportedly viewed verbalisation as a useful strategy and most participants were able to describe their increased theoretical understanding of the concepts explicitly taught. However, their conceptual understanding did not always translate into their actual performance. These findings raise pedagogical implications and highlight the need for human mediators to make explicit the learning concepts, materials and strategies, so that theoretical understanding and learning tools can lead to meaningful task performance. Based on the above findings, this thesis proposes a self-regulation model and calls for future research to investigate how explicit verbalisation training can be systematised.  

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  • Hostility in the House of God: An "Interested" Investigation of the Opponents in 1 and 2 Timothy

    Thornton, Dillon T. (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    To my knowledge, Pietersen’s study (2004) is the only monograph published in the last twenty years that has focused on the opponents in the Pastoral Epistles, but his work is not exegetical. In this thesis, I concentrate on 1 and 2 Timothy, the two letters purportedly dispatched to Ephesus. I assemble the relevant pericopae of the letters and offer an exegetical analysis of them, with the intention of providing, first, a composite sketch of the ideology of the opposing group and, second, an in-depth account of the way the faithful Pauline community was to engage these opponents. The first chapter of the thesis is devoted to preliminary issues and methodology. I argue that 1 and 2 Timothy constitute two types of letter, both dispatched in the late first century to the Christian community in Ephesus, each addressing a stage of the conflict in which the community was engaged. I further argue that the polemical portions of the letters reveal specific information about this conflict. I then formulate a stringent method for the study of Paul’s opponents. I summarize and critique historical-critical methodologies and bring the most recent work on theological interpretation of Scripture into dialogue with these methodologies. The result is a new approach to the study of opponents, one that remains rigorously tethered to the primary text and that is characterized by ecclesial concern. In chapters two to six, I apply this method to 1 and 2 Timothy. In chapter two, I offer an exegetical analysis of the explicit units of 1 Timothy, those units where we have clear and certain reference to the opponents (1:3-7, 18-20; 4:1-5; 6:2b-5, 20-21a). Chapters three and four focus on the implicit units in 1 Timothy, those units where we have highly probable reference to the opponents (1:8-11; 2:9-15; 4:6-10; 5:9-16; 6:6-10). In chapter five, I turn to 2 Timothy, analyzing the three explicit units (2:14-26; 3:1-9; 4:1-5) and the one implicit unit of the letter (2:8-13). In chapter six, I bring together the full gamut of data uncovered in the exegetical chapters, offering overall conclusions about the opponents in 1 and 2 Timothy. As a follow-up to this, I enumerate what I perceive to be the most important implications of the findings for the house of God today. My findings may be summarized as follows. I conclude that the opponents came from within the Christian community in Ephesus and that their teaching is best described as an erroneous eschatological position that derived from the complexity of Paul’s views. Each doctrinal and ethical issue raised in the explicit and implicit units of the letters can be explained as a distortion of Pauline doctrine. Additionally, I contend that the opponents had an active “didactic/evangelistic ministry” in Ephesus, for which they received remuneration. They likely set out to recruit as large a following, and as large an income, as possible, but found a particularly fruitful field among the women in Ephesus. As I formulate my view of the opponents, I critique a number of the extant theories, including “Gnostic,” Jewish, and Proto-Montanist identifications. I also conclude that the author engages with the false teachers in significant ways throughout the letters. I draw attention to a number of literary and theological maneuvers that are intended to counteract the opponents’ influence and/or to bolster the faithful community’s confidence as they struggle against the opponents. These include the way the author turns features of the opponents against them, his use of the faithful saying formula, the way he relates the Triune God and the principal adversary, Satan, to the opponents, and the way the author portrays the gospel as an unstoppable force in his own ministry. Though the author pictures the opponents as enemies of God, he also highlights the fact that the opponents are not beyond the reach of God’s grace; thus, Timothy is called to minister the saving word to them. In the explicit and implicit units, the author instructs Timothy to occupy himself with five specific activities: reflection on his commissioning and on the apostolic gospel, rejection of the opponents’ claims, proclamation of the healthy teaching, demonstration of the gospel in actions that are pleasing to God, and correction of the false teachers themselves. The wider faithful community is at least implicitly included in the activities of rejection, demonstration, and correction.

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  • Dissolved organic matter in New Zealand natural waters

    Gonsior, Michael (2008)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xi, 186 leaves :ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "1st of April 2008". University of Otago department: Chemistry.

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  • Public Theology, Core Values and Domestic Violence in Samoan Society

    Ah Siu-Maliko, Mercy (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The purpose of this research is to formulate a theologically coherent perspective on the complex social and moral questions facing contemporary Samoan society. It does so by constructing a contextual Samoan public theology, based on the core Samoan-Christian values of alofa (love), fa’aaloalo (respect), soalaupule (consensual dialogue), tautua (selfless service) and amiotonu (justice). Drawing on scholarship on public theology, as well as relevant interdisciplinary sociological, cultural and religious studies, the thesis examines the nature and constituent elements of public theology, both in the West and in Samoa. To construct a framework for a public theology for Samoa based on its core values, the study examines the significance of the fa’asamoa (Samoan way of life) and its value system. Key to this framework is an understanding of the fusion between Samoan values and Christian values. Because ‘the public’ are the subjects of public theology, a crucial element of the construction of a Samoan public theology is the incorporation of the views of representative voices within Samoan society. Using constructivist grounded theory and talanoa Pacific research methodologies, seventy-five interviews from representatives of government, civil society, churches and villages garner valuable information on Samoans’ core values and their relevance for a public theology. The information on core values gleaned from research participants and other scholarship reveals how they can be brought to bear on social issues in the Samoan public sphere – the ‘why, who, what and how’ of a Samoan public theology. This collective knowledge suggests concrete ways of shaping theological discourse and moral action in contemporary Samoan society. The thesis ends with a contextual application of core Samoan-Christian values, as a public theology response to the social problem of domestic violence in Samoa.

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  • El camino se hace caminando: Using Participatory Action Research to evaluate and develop Peace Education practice in a Secondary School in Northern Nicaragua

    Kertyzia, Heather (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Peace education (PE) is included in the cross-curricular themes of the Nicaraguan curriculum, yet in the Secondary School in Northern Nicaragua (SSINN) where this research was conducted there was varied implementation by teachers. The SSINN was selected for this research due to particular problems with violence. Based on a critical and post-development theory perspective and using participatory action research (PAR) methodology, teachers, school psychologists and administrators were led through a facilitated process of reflection upon the culture of peace/violence in the SSINN and teacher practice. This was guided by the concepts of education about (content), for (skills and behaviours) and by peace (pedagogy). PAR is guided by a series of principles that allow for flexibility and response to participant needs. In this case SSINN educators and I engaged in a process of building trust, gathering reconnaissance data, developing action plans and taking action. This was guided by our unofficial motto ‘the path is made by walking’ (el camino se hace caminando), implying that we were learning as we worked together and the process had to be adaptable to new circumstances. Through workshops and coffee chats we evaluated staff definitions of a culture of peace, priorities in relation to peace values, behaviours and content, and teacher practice in regards to peace principles. As part of the reciprocal process, educators gave feedback and directed the research, which was designed to emphasize educator voice and minimize the neo-colonial imposition of values from outside actors. In this way I sought to balance critical theory’s need to take action for positive change with post-development theory’s prioritizing of local educator voice. The primary goals of the research were to develop an understanding of how PE was practised in the SSINN and, if the educators requested it, to provide support in taking positive action for change, while assessing the effectiveness of the PAR methodology. In the beginning the educators had differing definitions of a culture of peace, but they were very consistent in their ideas of what content, skills and values should be included in PE. Although they regularly mentioned problems that were directly relevant to students’ lives that should be addressed in the classroom, not all of the teachers were actively doing this. Due to a lack of resources, time, teacher stress and overcrowding, many teachers were unable to translate those ideas into action. Also due to those factors, many teachers fell into habits of traditional teaching practice that were inconsistent with peace pedagogy. Recognizing these issues, the teachers requested workshops on non-violent communication and conflict transformation in the hope that that knowledge would aid them to more positively manage behaviour. They also created and implemented an action plan. Although positive steps were taken, this was the first stage of a long-term process of change. Partnering with local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) has provided the possibility of the continuation of the process; nevertheless those NGOs have stated that they need continued external support. This flexible PAR methodology was effective at exploring and developing PE practice in the SSINN, and has the potential, if continued, to lead to fundamental positive change.

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  • Aspects of the biology of some New Zealand echinoderms : feeding, growth and reproduction in the asteroids, Patiriella regularis (Verrill, 1867) and Coscinasterias calamaria (Gray, 1840).

    Crump, Robin (1969)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    192 leaves :illus. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: p.138-147. The author's "The flight response in Struthiolaria papulosa giges Sowerby", reprinted from the New Zealand journal of marine and freshwater research, v.2, no.3, Sept., 1968, in pocket. University of Otago department: Zoology

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  • A Transcriptomic Examination of Sexual Differentiation in Zebrafish, Danio rerio

    Lee, Stephanie Ling Jie (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Zebrafish sex determination and sexual differentiation is complex. Neither sex chromosomes, major sex-determining genes nor universal sex-linked markers have been identified, and a variety of environmental factors can influence sex ratios. It is thus unsurprising that the molecular pathways underpinning zebrafish sexual development remain poorly understood. A few key genes such as, SRY-box containing gene 9a (sox9a), anti-Müllerian hormone (amh), cytochrome P450, family 19, subfamily A, polypeptide 1a (cyp19a1a) are known to play roles in zebrafish gonadal differentiation. However, at this time, there are many more questions than answers about sex determination and differentiation in this ubiquitious, and immensely well-studied, species. As with many other vertebrates, sex hormone treatment can induce sex reversal of gonadal phenotype and sexual behaviour in zebrafish. In this study, we take advantage of hormonal manipulation of sex in developing zebrafish and RNA-Seq to unravel the unknown genetic pathways that underlie sex determination and sexual differentiation. We conducted global transcriptomic profiling of juvenile zebrafish brains and gonads at two important developmental stages in gonadal differentiation: (1) juvenile ovary-to-testis transformation (40 days post fertilization) and (2) the completion of testicular and ovarian differentiation (60 days post fertilization). Gene expression profiles from 17α-methyltestosterone masculinised juvenile zebrafish were also compared with untreated zebrafish to improve understanding of androgenic effects on zebrafish sexual differentiation pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first study profiling transcriptome-wide sex dimorphic gene expression in teleost brains during gonadal differentiation. We identified modest sex differences in developing zebrafish brains; 33 and 185 sex dimorphic genes were identified in the brains of 40 dpf and 60 dpf zebrafish respectively. Methyltestosterone treatment significantly altered expression patterns at both timepoints. We observed a total of 1,554 genes differentially expressed between control female brains and MT-treated brains at 40 dpf. 1,379 genes were differentially expressed between 40 dpf male brains and 40 dpf MT-treated brains. At 60 dpf, 728 genes exhibited differential expression between control female brains and MT-treated brains. Interestingly, significantly fewer genes (269) were differentially expressed between control male brains and MT-treated brains at 60 dpf. In contrast, we observed extensive sex differences in zebrafish gonadal transcriptomes. A total of 5,039 genes were sexually dimorphic at 40 dpf. 2,502 and 2,537 genes were up-regulated in transforming testes and juvenile ovaries respectively. At 60 dpf, we identified 4,190 testis-biased genes and 4,267 ovary-biased genes. Many of the sex dimorphic genes identified have no previous links with gonadal differentiation. Despite accelerated testicular development in MT-treated zebrafish, the numbers of differentially expressed genes identified when control ovaries were compared to control testes or MT-treated testes were similar. We identified 5,237 differentially expressed genes between 40 dpf juvenile ovaries and 40 dpf MT-treated testes. 7,513 genes were differentially expressed between ovaries and MT-treated testes at 60 dpf. There were considerably fewer differences between control testes and MT-treated testes. While 1,222 genes were differentially expressed between control testes and MT-treated testes at 40 dpf, only 20 genes separated the transcriptomes of 60 dpf control testes and MT-treated testes. It appears that androgen-induced masculinization shares key molecular regulators with normal testicular differentiation. A pair of rec8 genes were up-regulated in control testes and MT-treated testes. Testis-biased Rec8 expression was previously reported in mammals. Rec8 is required for sister chromatid cohesion, formation of synaptonemal complexes and homologous recombination during meiosis. To elucidate the functional significance of rec8 genes in testicular development, we characterized rec8 genes in adult zebrafish. Sequence homology, synteny and phylogenetic relationships between the zebrafish rec8 genes were explored in silico. Analysis of rec8a and rec8b gene expression in adult zebrafish confirmed testis-biased expression. Our work sets up a framework for which we can explore further functional testing of zebrafish rec8 genes using morpholino knockdown and CRISPR/Cas knockout technologies.

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  • Age, growth and feeding ecology of five co-occurring fishes in southern New Zealand

    Jiang, Weimin (2002)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 340 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Marine Science

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  • The cultural transmission of cookery knowledge : from seventeenth century Britain to twentieth century New Zealand

    Inglis, Raelene (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xv, 354 leaves :ill., map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Anthropology.

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  • Feeding the lambs : the influence of Sunday Schools in the socialization of children in Otago and Southland, 1848-1901

    Keen, David Stuart (1999)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 250 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • 'The danger of vertigo' : an evaluation and critique of Theōsis in the theology of Thomas Forsyth Torrance

    Habets, Michael (2006)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 387 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Theology and Religious Studies

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  • ICTs and Rural Development in South India: Problematising Empowerment, Social Capital and Volunteering

    Chatbar, Rakhee (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis examines the deployment of Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D) in rural India. It seeks to contribute to scholarly discussions in the field of ICT4D by examining one particular project, the M. S. Swaminathan Research Foundation’s Village Knowledge Centres (VKCs) and the Village Resource Centres (VRCs) initiative in rural South India. Drawing from substantive field research conducted in the state of Tamil Nadu and the Union Territory of Pondicherry, this thesis examines the three key developmental outcomes of the VKCs initiative — empowerment, social capital, and volunteering. The thesis argues that the VKCs initiative has not successfully met the key development objectives as the opportunities offered are not transformative and do not alter existing structural conditions. This is because the micro-contextual variations within and across rural communities are not adequately integrated into the design and implementation of the project. The thesis also argues that the VKCs initiative in rural India is significantly impacted by larger global and national structures. A more robust engagement by the NGO that considers the inter-connectedness of institutional, social and cultural structures and micro-contexts is central to harness the potential of ICTs to deliver development objectives. In undertaking this study, the thesis makes the following research contributions. First, the thesis responds to scholarly demand for empirically based engagements as a key means to ascertain the potential of ICTs for development. Secondly, the thesis broadens the theoretical and empirical understanding of empowerment, social capital and volunteering in ICT4D. Finally, the thesis proposes a number of practical recommendations for policy makers. The thesis aims to contribute to research in ICT4D, studies on rural development in India, and to future strategies for incorporating ICTs more effectively in development planning and practice.

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  • The son enthroned in conflict : a socio-rhetorical interpretation of John 5.17-23

    Huie-Jolly, Mary R (1994)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xviii, 333 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Theology

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  • Actions of attention, and attention to action: investigating the relationship between visual attention, episodic representation, and language

    Webb, Andrew (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Cognitive representations of episodes are likely to play an important role in the neural mechanisms representing the syntactic and semantic structure of natural language sentences. However, there is little consensus on how observed episodes are represented in the brain, and how those episode representations can be transformed to and from corresponding sentence descriptions. This work investigates the theory that there is a direct structural relationship between the representation of episodes and sentences describing those episodes, and that the underlying mechanism which informs the representation of an episode is based upon the sequence of sensorimotor actions involved in observing that episode. This gives rise to two predictions: firstly that there is a canonical sequence of sensorimotor actions involved in observing actions, and secondly, that changing that sequence leads to systematic changes in descriptions of those actions. Experimental results confirm that there is a strong default sensorimotor sequence involved in the observation of a range of transitive actions. However, in part due to the robustness of the default sensorimotor sequence, the second prediction was not confirmed.

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  • Taxonomy and phylogeny of industrial solvent-producing clostridia

    Keis, Stefanie (1996)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xii, 314 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "June 1996". Includes previously published material by the author. University of Otago department: Microbiology.

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  • Dr Edward Shortland and the politics of ethnography

    Lousberg, Marjan Marie (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xi, 321 leaves :col. port., map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: History.

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