227 results for University of Waikato, Book item

  • Implementation considerations in supervisory control

    Malik, Robi; Dietrich, Petra; Wonham, W. M.; Brandin, Bertil A. (2001-06)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    With supervisory control theory it is possible to describe controllers which influence the behaviour of a system by disabling controllable events. But sometimes it is desirable to have a controller which not only disables controllable events but also chooses one among the enabled ones. This event can be interpreted as a command given to the plant. This idea is formalized in the concept of an implementation, which is a special supervisor, enabling at most one controllable event at a time. In this paper, some useful properties are introduced, which ensure, when met, that each implementation of a given DES is nonblocking. The approach is applied to a simple chemical batch process example.

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  • From assimilation to biculturalism: Changing patterns in Maori-Pakeha relationships

    Thomas, David R.; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (1996)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter examines the changing patterns of inter-ethnic relationships among Maori and Pakeha in New Zealand, specifically the moves from assimilation towards biculturalism. The impact of recent debate about the Treaty of Waitangi is described and examples of bicultural policies and their consequences are outlined.

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  • Productivist and post-productivist conceptualizations of agriculture from a New Zealand perspective

    Jay, Grace Mairi M. (2004)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This paper considers productivist/post-productivist conceptualisations of agriculture in the light of changing New Zealand attitudes toward protection of indigenous vegetation and wildlife. It will show how the attitude of farmers toward native habitat and wildlife mirror changes in the wider New Zealand society. It will suggest that post-productivist elements vary from one part of the world to another, and thereby reflect not so much change within agriculture, or even change within rural society, but changing relationships between the wider society (of which agriculture is always a part), and the environment.

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  • Mental health and legal landscapes

    Campion, Michelle Edith (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    When it was established early in the twentieth century, Tokanui became part of a network of mental hospitals that were responsible for the care and confinement of the insane and the mentally deficient. At the time of its construction Tokanui was the first new mental hospital commissioned in over 20 years and the first to be built in the central North Island. Of those mental hospitals operating in 1912 all, except Ashburn Hall (the country's only private institution), were government controlled and funded. State dominance in the management of mental abnormality was the result of an unofficial policy which followed English precedent, favouring government intervention in the belief that it produced beneficial results and which endorsed the conviction that government responsibility for such matters could not be divested to a third party. This position was strengthened by the paucity of a prosperous philanthropic class who would otherwise have bridged the gulf between demand and supply under the auspices of charity. The essence of this philosophy was reflected in the early nineteenth and twentieth-century legislation which governed the development and management of New Zealand's mental hospitals.

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  • An introduction to ethical consideration in international environmental law

    Gillespie, Alexander (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this chapter is to give the reader an overview of where some of the ethical debates in international environmental law are currently found. This chapter builds upon my earlier work in this area, which is contained in “International Environmental Law, Policy and Ethics”.

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  • Scientific workflow management with ADAMS

    Reutemann, Peter; Vanschoren, Joaquin (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    We demonstrate the Advanced Data mining And Machine learning System (ADAMS), a novel workflow engine designed for rapid prototyping and maintenance of complex knowledge workflows. ADAMS does not require the user to manually connect inputs to outputs on a large canvas. It uses a compact workflow representation, control operators, and a simple interface between operators, allowing them to be auto-connected. It contains an extensive library of operators for various types of analysis, and a convenient plug-in architecture to easily add new ones.

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  • Engineering: good for technology education?

    Williams, P. John (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Recent curriculum changes in the educational system of Australia have resulted in study options being available in Engineering for senior secondary students to use for university entrance. In other educational systems, Engineering is playing an increasingly important role, either as a stand-alone subject or as part of an integrated approach to Science, Mathematics and Technology. These developments raise questions about the relationship between Engineering and Technology education, some of which are explored in this paper.

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  • The contructivist paradigm and some implications for science content and pedagogy

    Carr, Malcolm; Barker, Miles; Bell, Beverley; Biddulph, Fred; Jones, Alister; Kirkwood, Valda; Pearson, John; Symington, David (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Through a comparison of the widely-held traditional view of science with the constructivist view of science, we argue that the constructivist view of the content of science has important implications for classroom teaching and learning. This alternative view of science concepts as human constructs, scrutinised by application of the rules of the game of science, raises many challenges for teachers. Reconceptualisation of teachers' views of the nature of science and of learning in science is important for a constructivist pedagogy. We argue here that open discussion of the 'rules of the game' of science would contribute to better learning in the classroom, since learners would be better equipped to change their existing concepts by knowing more about the nature of science itself.

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  • ‘Framing the project’ of international human rights law: Reflections on the dysfunctional ‘family’ of the Universal Declaration

    Grear, Anna (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Full text embargoed until November 2013.

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  • To act or not to act? That is the question!

    Bruce Ferguson, Pip (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The year was 2003. I was a new Research Manager working in a Māori tertiary institution that had a history of inequitable treatment by government, through not receiving establishment funding that had gone unproblematically to non-Māori institutions. Repeating a common pattern in New Zealand, our government had decided to implement a research funding scheme, to be measured at the level of the individual academic. My institution’s decision to participate in the PBRF was not without its difficulties, and it is here that the ethics of participation become problematic. This chapter is about our ability to articulate our values, to show how we work these out in our practice, and how we are accountable to ourselves and others for that practice. Would I, with the benefit of hindsight, have encouraged my institution to enter the PBRF again?

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  • Street health: Practitioner service provision for Maori homeless people in Auckland

    Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Hodgetts, Darrin; Groot, Shiloh Ann Maree; Stolte, Ottilie Emma Elisabeth; Chamberlain, Kerry (2012-09)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Drawing insights from interviews with Maori homeless people, health professionals, and relevant local and international literatures, this chapter focuses on the provision of medical care to homeless people. In particular, we propose that health services orientate to accommodate the worldviews and circumstances of Maori homeless people. Below we consider colonialism and societal developments that have led to homelessness among Maori today. We then present a case study of ‘Grant’, which was compiled from common aspects of various Maori homeless people who access health services at the Auckland City Mission (ACM); an organisation with a long history of catering to the needs and hopes of dispossessed groups, providing food, clothing, advocacy, social and health services. The relational orientation of healthcare at the ACM is discussed, and leads to an exploration of ‘judgement-free service space’ for meeting client needs (cf., Trussell & Mair, 2010). Lastly, we focus on how health professionals can respond to the multiple healthcare needs of Maori homeless people, in partnership with social services.

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  • Wine maturation using high electric field

    Talele, Sadhana; Benseman, Mark (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Wine maturation can take a long time and consumes storage space which can be a drawback while considering commercial aspect of wine making. In the past scientists have carried out experiments on maturing wine quickly using ultrasounds or gamma radiations. This study reports about maturing wine with high electric field at different frequencies applied for a short time duration. The electric field intensity and the frequency of the field along with the exposure time of wine to this field seem to be important parameters that could affect the the treated wine. Results obtained are encouraging and have a potential for commercial interest.

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  • Drug delivery by electroporation: Review

    Talele, Sadhana (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Drug delivery is the method or process of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a therapeutic effect in humans or animals. Most common routes of administration include the preferred non-invasive peroral (through the mouth), topical (skin), transmucosal (nasal, buccal/sublingual, vaginal, ocular and rectal) and inhalation routes. Current effort in the area of drug delivery include the development of targeted delivery in which the drug is only active in the target area of the body (for example, in cancerous tissues) and sustained release formulations in which the drug is released over a period of time in a controlled manner from a formulation. This is achieved by combining electroporation with the input of drugs at a location. This paper reviews the process of electroporation and then further discusses the electrochemotherapy, one of the most upcoming application of electroporation in biotechnology.

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  • Gambling with communities

    Curtis, Bruce; Wilson, Cate (2002)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In this chapter we draw attention to spoken and unspoken aspects of government policy found in the disadvantaging of community forms of gambling. Much of the rhetoric presented by government claims to be about protecting communities from gambling, but we argue that this language is at odds with the realities of policy and of practice. Such rhetoric foreshadowed the recent Review of Gaming, but the outcomes to date are not designed to redress the balance. These outcomes include a moratorium on casino licences securing the existing monopoly, increased surveillance on gaming machines run by clubs and pubs by the Department of Internal Affairs, and a bizarre effort to check Internet-based gambling in New Zealand Department of Internal Affairs, 2001.

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  • Everyday gambling in New Zealand

    Curtis, Bruce; Wilson, Cate (2001)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    There is a sizeable body of statistics on gambling in New Zealand which points albeit unintentionally - to the everyday status of this activity. Max Abbott and Rachel Volberg, two leading figures in the rapidly growing discipline of gambling studies, note that in 15 short years there have been no less than seven surveys on gambling in New Zealand (not including a large number of university theses). These include three assessments of people's participation in gambling by the Department of Internal Affairs, plus two surveys funded by the department focusing on problem gambling. To these can be added one conducted by a regional health authority, North Health, under contract to the Committee on Problem Gambling Management and one conducted on behalf of the Casino Control Authority. This much research on gambling should suggest to the reader that there is something about gambling that piques the interest of government bureaucrats and agencies. Here the frequency of the phrase `problem gambling' is the giveaway. In this section we will review some of the findings of this research and cover its more pathological rationale later.

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  • Revisioning the Pacific: Bernard Smith in the South Seas

    Ryan, Tom (2005)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    BORN IN Sydney in 1986, Bernard Smith is today widely considered to be Australia's preeminent art historian and a major cultural theorist.¹ While working as a school teacher and artist during the late 1930S and early 1940s, he came under the influences of surrealist aesthetics and communist politics, especially as mediated by refugee intellectuals from Hitler's Europe. During this period his principal literary inspirations were the Bible, Marx, and Toynbee; it was their different takes on history, especially of its unfolding over long durations, that most impressed him.² As an academic and writer through the next half century, Smith produced numerous historically oriented studies of Australian and modernist art, which broadly can be divided into two periods of publishing activity.³ His most acclaimed achievement, however, is European Vision and the South Pacific 1768-1850: A Study in the History of Art and Ideas, first published in 1960 and a work that has continued to grow in stature and influence in the four decades since its original appearance. It is the history of this text, and of its companion-piece, Imagining the Pacific: In the Wake of the Cook Voyages, published in 1992, and the contexts in which they were produced and have been consumed, that are the main concerns of the present essay.⁴

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  • Huw Price

    Legg, Catherine (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    A review of the life and work of Australian philosopher, Huw Price.

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  • Addressing diversity: Race, ethnicity, and culture in the classroom

    Bishop, Russell (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The widely accepted educational goals for Maori, established at the first Hui Taumata Matauranga held in 2001, are that Maori ought to be able to live as Maori, actively participate as citizens of the world, and enjoy both good health and high standards of living (Durie, 2001). Together with the government goals of equipping learners with twenty-first century skills and reducing systemic underachievement in education, these goals inform the new 2008-2012 Maoni Education Strategy, Ka Hikitia Managing for Success (Ministry of Education, 2007), which has as its main strategic outcome: Maori students enjoying education success as Maori. Within this frame, there are four student outcomes for Maori: learning to learn, making a distinctive cultural contribution, contributing to Te Ao Maori, and contributing to Aotearoa/New Zealand and the world.

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  • Education leaders can reduce educational disparities

    Bishop, Russell (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter is about how education leaders can act to reduce educational disparities for indigenous and other minoritized peoples through strategic goal setting, supporting effective pedagogies of relations, promoting distributed leadership, enacting inclusivity, using evidence and owning the need for reform. Examples are drawn from a large-scale, theory-based education reform project called Te Kotahitanga which is currently running in 50 secondary schools in New Zealand. Developing a model for effective leadership needs to commence with the understanding that the key to change is teacher action supported by responsive structural reform (Elmore 2004). In our earlier work (Bishop et al. 2003, 2007) we investigated what effective teacher action looks like. This chapter presents a model of what “responsive structural reform” looks like in practice and what leaders need to do to implement and sustain gains made in student performance at the classroom, school and system-wide levels.

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  • Three feminist critiques of varying feminist capitulations to crisis-hegemony

    Grear, Anna (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The seemingly intractable pull between the Scylla of 'resistance' and the Charybdis of 'compliance' and the agonistic dilemmas presented by the complexity and difficulty of positioning feminism in relation to them both is well-traced in these chapters by Dianne Otto, Julie Mertus and Maria Grahn-Farley. While a range of themes emerges from reflection on these nuanced and thoughtful chapters, at the heart of each, in different ways, the colonisation of certain emancipatory feminist projects and agendas by the crisis-driven post 9/11 international legal discourse emerges as a central concern, along with a set of related sub-themes: The traction (and inequality) of hegemonic and counter-hegemonic thought-worlds and actions; the pernicious effects of decontextualisation (either the transcendence or the 'emptying out' of context (including,worryingly, lived experience of violation)); the fragile potency of ground level viewpoint, action and perspective; the false totality of the securityhegemon; its liquid propagandism, and related concerns circling around co-opted feminist responses.

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