1,230 results for University of Waikato, Conference item

  • Qualitative telephone interviews: Strategies for success

    Farooq, Muhammad Bilal (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The use of the telephone in qualitative interviews is discouraged by traditionalists who view it as an inferior data collection instrument. However these claims have not been supported by empirical evidence and qualitative researchers who have used and compared the telephone to the face-to-face mode of interviewing present a different story. This study attempts to build on the limited existing research comparing the issues involved and the data collected using the telephone and face-to-face interview modes. The study evaluates the criticisms of traditionalists in the light of existing research. The study then presents the observations of the researcher based on a research project that involved 43 telephone, 1 Skype and 6 face-to-face interviews. These observations as well as the limited prior research are used to develop strategies for the effective use telephone interviews in qualitative research. The study concludes that for certain studies the telephone if used with the strategies recommended here provides qualitative researchers with a sound data collection instrument.

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  • On the Matter of Kava: From the Past to the Present to the Future

    Māhina, Hūfanga ‘Ōkusitino (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Paradoxically, it is thought that people in Tonga specifically and the Moana Pacific generally walk forward (‘alu ki mu‘a) into the past (kuongamu‘a “age-in-the-front”) and, at the same timespace, walk backward (‘alu ki mui) into the future (kuongamui “age-in-the-back”), both taking place in the present (kuongaloto “age-in-the-middle”), where both the elusive, already-taken-place past and the illusive, yet-to-take-place future are constantly mediated in the ever-changing, conflicting present. Historically, it simply means that because the past (kuohili “that-which-has-come-to-pass”) has stood the test of timespace, it must be brought to the front (mu‘a) of people as guidance and because the future (kaha‘u “that-which-is-yet-to-come”) is yet to take place, it must be brought to the back (mui) of people, informed by their refined past knowledge, skills and experiences, both taking place in the present (lotolotonga “that which is the here-and-now”), where they are permanently negotiated in the social process. (Tā-Vā (Time-Space) Philosophy/Theory of Reality). This paper makes a serious attempt to critically examine the matter of kava in its multifarious dimensions from a tavaist philosophical or theoretical perspective. In doing so, it strictly calls for the systematic adoption of a logical, total rather than an illogical, partial approach to the matter of kava, justly critiquing it in the broader context of the time-space (tā-vā), form-content (fuo-uho) and functional (‘aonga) relationships between the past, present and future. Given that the matter of kava is both physical and social in nature, it therefore requires that it be reflected upon totally and not partially, focusing on the temporal-formal, spatial-substantial and functional relationships between plant (‘akau) and body (sino), specifically those relating to their bio-chemical, molecular biological, and narcotic properties. These are then projected both actually and symbolically beyond the realm of the physical to the domain of the social, where a range of lasting social institutions of immense intellectual, cultural, political, artistic and now economic significance have been established. By broadly situating the matter of kava in the plural, cultural, collectivistic, holistic and circular context of the past, present and future, by virtue of their coexistence and continuity as intersecting or connecting and separating physical and social tendencies, it is hope that we can have a clear sense of its historical and ceaseless transformation over time and space as a human concept and practice. This includes the increasing economic appropriation and exploitation of kava by multinational pharmaceutical companies on a large scale, in view of their total established physical and social attributes in reality as in nature, mind and society, where the truly controversial issue of biological, intellectual and cultural property ownership is introduced into the existing equation, theoretically and practically problematised by a sense of globalism, commercialism and legalism.

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  • Tongan men talk when the language (talanoa) and context (faikava) are Tongan

    Vaka, Sione (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    In Tongan society, Tongan males have the authority, while Tongan females hold the senior ranks in society. Other roles and responsibilities, including father, leader, provider, protector, negotiator, communicator, mentor and so forth, are also expected of Tongan males. Tongan men understand that these roles and responsibilities are to be performed effectively and held in high regard as they represent their father, grandfather, family, kāinga, village, and the Kingdom of Tonga. Despite the many tasks assumed by Tongan males, they are struggling to communicate, and have difficulty disclosing sensitive matters. Moving to New Zealand also introduces new challenges with a new environment, culture, technology, language, and ways of living. This paper focuses on talanoa with Tongan men around smoking in a faikava setting in Auckland. The information discussed in this chapter was generated by four different faikava groups that were hold at local churches in the Auckland area. During the talanoa, the men also discussed their roles and responsibilities and how these influenced their decisions.

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  • Faikava Navigation: Space for critical discussions about identity in diaspora

    Hernandez, Daniel (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This presentation explores a broad sense of diaspora drawing from both Mayan and Tongan concepts of time and space to explore these experiences. Additionally, Lucky Dube's song, The Other Side, is used as a framework for analyzing some comments from ethnographic data of Tongan and Moana (Oceanic) people commenting on struggles for identity. Kava circles serve as significant sites of making and keeping connections to homeland as well as creating spaces of interdependent support to face economic challenges in new homelands.

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  • The cultural classroom: The faikava as an epistemological site for teaching and learning

    Fehoko, Edmond S. (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    My Masters research explored the experiences and perceptions of New Zealand-born Tongan males who participate in the faikava (kava-drinking). The faikava is a well-known ceremonial cultural practice that in recent times has been adapted as an informal and recreational activity embedded in the activities of some churches and other agencies in Tongan migrant communities in New Zealand, Australia and in the United States of America. This cultural practice includes aspects of socialising, sharing and talking, social bonding and fostering camaraderie. For my study, the faikava was the vehicle for my data collection. This presentation will argue the value of the faikava as an epistemological site which provides New Zealand- born Tongan males with the opportunity to reinforce their knowledge of the anga fakatonga (Tongan culture) protocols and language and to engage in discussion about issues of concern to Tongan people today. Drawing on this, I will share my experience in researching in a gendered, social and cultural space in a predominant male practice.

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  • My experience as a female Tongan kava drinker

    Ma’u, Ikanamoe (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This presentation explains the cultural values and social significance of faikava from a Tongan female’s perspective. Tongan woman kava use is a present although often hidden and controversial practice. Because of this, Ikanamoe’s presentation was picked up and reported on by the media (http://www.radionz.co.nz/international/pacific-news/330400/drinking-kava-becoming-popular-with-tongan-women).

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  • Kava Haus Ltd: Distributor of innovative kava products

    Hau, Koloa (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Koloa Hau presents on why and how Kava Haus Ltd was created, where he see opportunities in the marketplace and the challenges ahead. The presentation also showcases current kava products from overseas manufacturers that have innovated kava into an off-the-shelf commercial product.

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  • Sleuths and Spies: the rise of the 'Everywoman' in detective and thriller fiction of the 1920s

    Bydder, Jillene; Franks, Rachel (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The 1920s, frequently referred to as the ‘Roaring Twenties’ or the ‘Jazz Age’, are often associated with opulent lifestyles and the emergence of striking fashion and furniture trends. Themes in the history of women in crime and thriller fiction show, however, that this decade was also a difficult period in the West, one of widespread financial hardship and of living in the shadow of social turmoil: anti-Semitism, conspiracy theories and fear of the foreign dominated the mainstream press as well as popular fiction. It was also a period in which women were working to navigate their way through a society changed forever by the experience of war. This paper examines some of the well-known detective and thriller fiction writers of the 1920s – Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers, John Buchan and William Le Queux – and shows how their characters chart the sexualisation of women as well as women’s resistance to the prevailing views of the day. Fictional women of this period represent ‘Everywoman’: independent and intelligent and, most importantly, sleuths and spies in their own right.

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  • 'You can't use that bathroom': Transgendering public toilets

    Johnston, Lynda (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This presentation discusses transgender people’s experiences of public toilets. I draw on interviews from my research project ‘Gender Variant Geographies’ to consider the costs of binary gendered – male and female - bathrooms. When public space is rigidly gendered, access and use is a concern for trans and/or gender non-conforming people. There are many gender variant bodies that do not fit a two sex model. There are also people who exhibit gendered characteristics that do not align with the expected performances of their sexed body. I report on findings from interviews with over 20 participants who were asked about their experiences of public toilets. Hostile reactions towards gender transgressions in bathrooms bring into stark relief the performative and material consequences of binary gender norms. Queer and transgender theories are used to analyse: first, ‘the bathroom problem’; second, cisgender privilege; and third, acts of policing gendered bathrooms and bodies.

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  • [Keynote] Feeling in / out of place: Queer geographies of belongings

    Johnston, Lynda (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Thank you for this opportunity to be part of your day. It’s a real honour to be here. I am excited by the theme ‘welcoming diversity’ as it sums up my approach to my professional and personal life. I have a long standing research interest in gender and sexual diverse people and places. At the heart of my approach is a commitment to a politics of difference. My presentation today will highlight this diversity at the levels of our bodies, communities, regions, and globally. I am going to give you a snap shot of research I have conducted over the past couple of decades that connects welcoming (or not welcoming) diversity with embodied feelings of being in / and or / out of place.

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  • Radial evolution of cross helicity at low and high latitudes in the solar wind

    Breech, Ben; Matthaeus, William H.; Minnie, J.; Oughton, Sean; Parhi, S.; Bieber, J.W.; Bavassano, B. (2005)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    We employ a turbulence transport theory to the radial evolution of the solar wind at both low and high latitudes. The theory includes cross helicity, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, and driving by shear and pickup ions. The radial decrease of cross helicity, observed in both low and high latitudes, can be accounted for by including sufficient shear driving to overcome the tendency of MHD turbulence to produce Alfvénic states. The shear driving is weaker at high latitudes leading to a slower evolution. Model results are compared with observations from Ulysses and Voyager.

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  • Shape predicates allow unbounded verification of linearizability using canonical abstraction

    Friggens, David; Groves, Lindsay (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Canonical abstraction is a static analysis technique that represents states as 3-valued logical structures, and is able to construct finite representations of systems with infinite statespaces for verification. The granularity of the abstraction can be altered by the definition of instrumentation predicates, which derive their meaning from other predicates. We introduce shape predicates for preserving certain structures of the state during abstraction. We show that shape predicates allow linearizability to be verified for concurrent data structures using canonical abstraction alone, and use the approach to verify a stack and two queue algorithms. This contrasts with previous efforts to verify linearizability with canonical abstraction, which have had to employ other techniques as well.

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  • ‘If your daughters are inclined to love reading, do not check their Inclination'

    McKim, Anne M. (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This paper examines attitudes to the education of children in elite families in eighteenth-century Scotland revealed in various letters, private papers, and memoirs. It takes as its starting point Lady Mary Wortley Montagu’s famous advice to her daughter, Mary Stuart, Countess of Bute (1718-1794), on the education of her granddaughters. Lady Louisa Stuart, one of those six granddaughters, went on to become a writer as well as an avid reader, and later recalled the childhood pleasures of reading books from her grandmother’s vast library. Provision for the education of her daughters and grandchildren, at home and abroad, can also be traced in some detail in the meticulous Household Book and notebooks kept by Lady Grisell Baillie (1665-1746). Her daughter Griseld, Lady Murray (1693-1759), later commemorated her famous mother’s commitment to education. Attitudes to reading, learning languages and education through travel to Europe can be traced in the private papers of these families, and in the views of the children who went on to express their appreciation in memoirs and biographies published in honour of their mothers and grandmothers.

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  • A study of polyvinyl butyryl based binder system in titanium based metal injection moulding

    Thavanayagam, Gnanavinthan; Zhang, Deliang; Pickering, Kim L.; Raynova, Stiliana (Stella) Rousseva (2012)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Metal injection moulding (MIM) is an innovative injection moulding technique widely used to produce complex shaped components from feedstock composed of metal powders and thermosetting or thermoplastic binders. In MIM, binder selection and formulation are considered as critical processes since binder characteristics dictate the success of MIM. The purpose of this study is to determine the feasibility of polyvinyl butyryl (PVB) based binder system in Ti-6Al-4V(wt.%)/binder feedstock, as well as to understand the effects of key parameters, such as powder loading and mixing conditions on the rheological properties of a feedstock. In this study, PVB, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and stearic acid (SA) were chosen to formulate a multi-component binder system to prepare Ti-6Al-4V based feedstock with the aid of three types of mixers: a compounder, a modified mechanical mixer and a twin screw extruder. Further, morphological analysis was performed using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thermal analysis was performed using simultaneous differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. Results showed that binder formulation was reasonably successful with the aid of both mechanical mixer and a twin screw extruder under certain mixing conditions, and the critical powder loading was 68 vol.%, resulting in an optimum powder loading of 63 vol.%.

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  • New public management and employee share ownership plan in Fiji’s public sector

    Sharma, Umesh Prasad; An, Yi (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This article provides insights into the implementation of new public management (NPM) practices in Fiji Telecom and whether the use of the employee share ownership scheme was helpful in the organisational change process. The NPM practices were influenced by the World Bank and International Monetary Fund who were the lenders to Fiji government. The adoption of NPM practices was part of a political, economic and public sector reforms introduced after 1989. The paper discusses the background and obstacles of the reform and how the employee share ownership scheme practice at a privatised Telecom Company assists employees to assimilate commercial business norms. The authors finally make recommendations for policy-makers in Fiji and other developing nations.

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  • The impact of immigration on international trade: a meta‐analysis

    Genc, Murat; Gheasi, Masood; Nijkamp, Peter; Poot, Jacques (2011)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Since the early 1990s many studies have been conducted on the impact of international migration on international trade, predominantly from the host country perspective. Because most studies have adopted broadly the same specification, namely a log‐linear gravity model of export and import flows augmented with the logarithm of the stock of immigrants from specific source countries as an additional explanatory variable, the resulting elasticities are broadly comparable and yield a set of estimates that is well suited to meta‐analysis. We therefore compile and analyze in this paper the distribution of immigration elasticities of imports and exports across 48 studies that yielded 300 estimates. The results confirm that immigration boosts trade, but its impact is lower on trade in homogeneous goods. An increase in the number of immigrants by 10 percent increases the volume of trade by about 1‐2 percent The migrant elasticity of imports is on average similar to that of exports. The estimates are affected by the choice of some covariates, the nature of the data (cross‐section or panel) and the estimation technique. Elasticities vary between countries in ways that cannot be explained by study characteristics; host country differences in immigration policies do apparently matter for the trade impact. The trade‐enhancing impact of migration appears to be greater for migration between countries of different levels of development than between developed countries.

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  • Towards a TCT-inspired electronics concept inventory

    Scott, Jonathan B.; Harlow, Ann; Peter, Mira (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This study reports on the initial work on the use of Threshold Concept Theory (TCT) to develop a threshold-concept inventory – a catalogue of the important concepts that underlie electronics and electrical engineering (EE) – and an assessment tool – to investigate the depth of student understanding of threshold and related concepts, independent of students’ numerical ability and knowledge mimicry in the first-year course in electrical engineering. This is both challenging and important for several reasons: there is a known issue with student retention (Tsividis, 1998; 2009); the discipline is relatively hard for students because it concerns invisible phenomena; and finally it is one that demands deep understanding from the very start (Scott, Harlow, Peter, and Cowie, 2010). Although the focus of this research was on electronic circuits, findings regarding teaching and learning of threshold concepts (TCs) will inform lecturers in three other disciplines who are part of our project on threshold concepts.

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  • Pinch Analysis of an Industrial Milk Evaporator with Vapour Recompression Technologies

    Walmsley, Timothy Gordon; Walmsley, Michael R.W.; Neale, James R.; Atkins, Martin John (2015-08-24)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The present study focuses on applying Pinch Analysis to an industrial milk evaporator case study. Modern milk evaporators are typically integrated using both mechanical and thermal vapour recompression technologies as the primary means for attaining a high level of energy efficiency. A significant step change in energy efficiency for milk evaporators is achieved in this study by modifying the set-up of the concentration processing pathway in combination with an improved heat exchanger network design. To effectively perform the Pinch Analysis, a validated mass and energy balance model of the milk evaporator case study has been implemented in an Excel spreadsheet from which appropriate stream data may be extracted. In particular the Grand Composite Curve plays a critical role in identifying where vapour recompression units, which are a type of heat pump, may be applied to reduce thermal energy use by as much as 67%, which represents an annual utility cost saving between $640 – 820k /y.

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  • He rongo i te reo rauriki, i te reo reiuru – Discourse analysis and conversations of historical conservation in New Zealand newspapers

    Whaanga, Hēmi; Wehi, Priscilla M. (2015-11-23)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Biocultural conservation encompasses all forms of diversity: biological, cultural and linguistic. This requires the nurturing of human cultures, customs, languages, knowledge, and the plants and animals on which they depend. The current biodiversity crisis in Aotearoa and worldwide has led to wide ranging debate about environmental management and the cost of conservation. For Māori, however, much more than species diversity is at stake. In Te Ao Māori, people are linked directly to flora and fauna through whakapapa (ancestry). As such, conservation can be viewed, not in terms of preserving ‘otherness’, but in terms of preserving ‘us-ness’: our very selfhood. We use discourse analysis to examine the concept of ‘conservation’ in 19thC Aotearoa, and how this is perceived by Māori communities in particular. To investigate these relationships, we deconstruct and re-examine the notion of conservation and the range of interpretations associated with it that are evident in both Māori and English language newspapers published between 1840s and the early part of the 20thC. We highlight discussion of species that we have identified as culturally significant from an analysis of whakataukī, ancestral sayings that are an important part of Māori oral tradition. Our analyses focus on the complex inter-relationships between language, society and changing conservation thought in Aotearoa in the late 19th century, and how Māori society engaged with this concept.

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  • Māori Astronomy and Matariki

    Whaanga, Hēmi (2015-12-02)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Presented at the Māori Astronomy and Matariki to Year 10 Hamilton Girls’ High School Camp.

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