282 results for University of Waikato, Report

  • Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks of New Zealand: A reference volume of lithology, age and paleoenvironments with maps (PMAPs) and database.

    Kamp, Peter J.J.; Vincent, Kirsty A.; Tayler, Michael J.S. (2015)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This volume presents descriptive geological data and text about each Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic geological unit to formation and member level (in some cases) exposed on land in New Zealand, including their lithology, stratigraphic age and inferred environment of deposition or emplacement. These data are illustrated as two types of PMAPS: a present-day paleoenvironment map of New Zealand; and as restored paleoenvironment maps, one for each million years from 65 Ma to the present. These information and data underpin the development of a new Cenozoic paleogeographical model of New Zealand.

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  • Fishing activity in the Waikato and Waipa rivers

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Allan, Dave G.; Kilgour, Jonathan T.; Watene-Rawiri, Erina M.; Stichbury, Glen; Walsh, Cameron (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this research project is to collate information regarding the recent use of fisheries resources in the Waikato River and Waipa River catchment areas. In particular, the project sought to summarise the commercial, customary, and recreational fishing activity in the catchments of the Waikato and Waipa rivers in the spatial context of recently introduced co-governance areas. These fisheries include, but are not exclusive to, the broad range of aquatic life managed under the Fisheries Act 1996. Such information is required to support management which includes a co-management framework. The research describes the commercial, customary and recreational fisheries including species and quantities taken, fishing methods, and seasonal influences.

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  • Barrett Bush management plan

    Bryan, Catherine Louise (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The current vegetation pattern of Barrett Bush is the result of complex landscape changes of both recent and historic times. The most recent natural landscape changes occurred as the Waikato River meandered across the region, changing course over many years and depositing the alluvial plain that Barrett Bush grows on. More recent landscape changes have been the result of human activity as vegetation clearance and agricultural development has occurred throughout the district. Fortunately, Barrett Bush was set aside and the reserve now provides insight into original vegetation patterns as well as a refuge for biota characteristic of forests dominated by kahikatea. Barrett Bush sits a shallow depression of an alluvial plain with a podocarp vegetation composition that is classed as a kahikatea semi-swamp forest (Clarkson et al. 2007). Clarkson et al. (2007) describe the typical natural vegetation of kahikatea semi-swamp forest: “Semi-swamp forest dominated by kahikatea grew on the poorly drained shallow depressions. Several other species were present in varying amounts, including rimu, matai, pukatea, swamp maire, tawa, pokaka, and occasional cabbage tree. Prominent in the understorey were silver fern, mapou, hangehange, Coprosma areolata, and turepo, and sedges including Hymenophyllum demissum, hen and chicken fern, Astelia fragrans, A. grandis, and Microlaena avenacea.”

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  • Lake Rotokakahi water quality update 1990-2011

    Butterworth, Joseph (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Rotokakahi is an Iwi-owned lake administered by the Lake Rotokakahi Board of Control on Behalf of lake owners who are descendants from the Ngāti Tumatawera and Tūhourangi hapū of Te Arawa. It is mesotrophic (moderate water quality) lake with an area of 4.4 km² comprised of exotic forestry (57.1%), pasture (26.3%) and regenerating indigenous forest/scrub (16.6%).

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  • Life-history of Lake Horowhenua common smelt: analysis of otolith chemistry and vertebral counts

    Tana, Raymond; Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Horowhenua is a coastal eutrophic lake on the west coast of the North Island. A recent survey of the lake found lower than expected fish diversity but comparatively abundant native fish populations, comprising mostly shortfin and longfin eels (Anguilla australis and A. dieffenbachii). A weir on the outlet of the lake was ifentified as a potential barrier to fish migrations, reducing fish diversity and abundance in the lake. However, large numbers of common smelt (Retropinna retropinna) were collected during this survey, indicating that the population was eighter successfully reproducing in the lake or diadromous, i.e., migrating from the sea. Previous studies have shown that lacustrine common smelt can be distinguished from diadromous populations by differences in counts of vertebrae and gill rakers, and otolith microchemistry. Horizons Regional Council requested that an analysis of smelt otoliths and relevant morphological characteristics be performed to ascertain if the Lake Horowhenua population was diadromous.

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  • Assessment of fish populations in Lake Horowhenua, Levin

    Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Horowhenua (Waipunahau) is of substantial historical, cultural and recreational value to the people of the Horowhenua region. However, water quality and biodiversity within the lake has been in decline for a number of years. As part of lake restoration efforts by Horizons Regional Council and the Lake Horowhenua Trustees, a survey of fish species in Lake Horowhenua was conducted by the University of Waikato using boat electrofishing and fyke netting. A lake restoration plan had previously identified invasive fish species such as koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) and European perch (Perca fluviatilis) as being potential barriers to rehabilitation of the lake. The purpose of this survey was to determine the abundance and diversity of fish species within the lake and to ascertain if pest fish species were present at biomasses high enough to be negatively impacting on lake ecology. Recommendations would then be made as to the potential methods and necessity for pest fish removal.

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  • Fish biomass and gonad development in the Rotopiko (Serpentine) lakes.

    Wu, Nicholas; Daniel, Adam Joshua; Tempero, Grant Wayne

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The Rotopiko (Serpentine) lake complex is one of the Waikato region’s few peat lake systems that contains primarily native aquatic plants. Retaining the natural state of the lakes has been considered a high priority by the Department of Conservation (DOC) and extensive efforts have taken place to prevent nutrient leaching and to control invasive organisms in the lakes. The University of Waikato was contracted to investigate the biomass of introduced and native fish in the Rotopiko lakes in order to determine if the fish removal with rotenone, a chemical piscicide, was required as proposed by DOC. Fish were collected using a variety of traps and nets prior to making and release. Following a dispersal period, each lake was then fished a second time and fish biomass was estimated using a capture-mark-release-recapture study design; population estimates were derived using the Lincoln-Petersen method (Nichols 1992).

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  • Preliminary analysis of boat electrofishing in the Waikato River in the vicinity of the Huntly Power Station: Part 1 - fishing on 2 September 2013

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report gives a basic summary of the first sampling of a three-part monitoring project for Genesis Power Ltd (Genesis) that the University of Waikato is undertaking in close collaboration with National Institute of Water and Environmental Research Institute Atmosphere Ltd (NIWA), Hamilton, Boat electrofishing results will eventually be combined with netting undertaken by NIWA in a final report to Genesis. The boat electrofishing survey took place on 2 September, the objective of which was to undertake the first of three surveys to estimate fish distributions and abundances over key seasons: 1. Early spring 2013 (end August/early September) to target peak trout abundances and cyprinid distributions during cooler months of the year. 2. Summer 2014 (Jan/February) to capture peak summer abundances for target indigenous and exotic species. 3. Winter 2014 (June/July) to target mullet and cyprinid distributions during cooler months of the year. At the surveyed reach is about 80 km from the sea, and at this point the Waikato River is a 7th order river with at a bed elevation of about 19.1 m above sea level. The catchment area upstream is 12,188 km², and the river has a mean flow of 352.3 m³ s⁻¹ and a mean annual low flow of 123.5 m³ s⁻¹ (Freshwater Fish Database Assistant version 6.1, I.G. Jowett).

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  • Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana = The confiscation of Tauranga lands. [Volume 1]

    Stokes, Evelyn (1990)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A report providing a historical and geographical overview on the confiscation of Tauranga lands. In two volumes, volume one comprises a narrative of the events described as the raupatu, the confiscation of lands in the Tauranga Moana tribal area under the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863. Volume two is a collection of documents, edited and annotated which were compiled in support of the report. These documents include personal accounts, tribal history, land purchases, lands returned and crown transactions.

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  • Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana : Volume 2, Documents relating to tribal history, confiscation and reallocation of Tauranga lands.

    Stokes, Evelyn (1993)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A report providing a historical and geographical overview on the confiscation of Tauranga lands. In two volumes, volume one comprises a narrative of the events described as the raupatu, the confiscation of lands in the Tauranga Moana tribal area under the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863. Volume two is a collection of documents, edited and annotated which were compiled in support of the report. These documents include personal accounts, tribal history, land purchases, lands returned and crown transactions.

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  • Research, Analysis and Insight into National Standards (RAINS) Project. Second Report: Understanding New Zealand’s Very Local National Standards

    Thrupp, Martin (2013-04)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This is the second report of the Research, Analysis and Insight into National Standards (RAINS) project, a three-year study of the introduction of National Standards into New Zealand primary and intermediate schools.

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  • Research, Analysis and Insight into National Standards (RAINS) Project Final Report: National Standards and the Damage Done

    Thrupp, Martin; White, Michelle (2013-11)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This is the final report of the Research Analysis and Insight into National Standards (RAINS) project, a three-year study of the enactment of the National Standards policy in six diverse primary and intermediate schools. This report provides an overview discussion of the pros and cons of the National Standards policy as experienced by staff, children and parents in the RAINS schools. It summarises the policy and methodological background to the research and the findings of the two previous RAINS reports. The report is also being accompanied by online case studies and other data files.

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  • Science in the New Zealand Curriculum e-in-science

    Buntting, Catherine Michelle; MacIntyre, Bill; Falloon, Garry; Cosslett, Graeme; Forret, Michael (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This milestone report explores some innovative possibilities for e-in-science practice to enhance teacher capability and increase student engagement and achievement. In particular, this report gives insights into how e-learning might be harnessed to help create a future-oriented science education programme. “Innovative” practices are considered to be those that integrate (or could integrate) digital technologies in science education in ways that are not yet commonplace. “Future-oriented education” refers to the type of education that students in the “knowledge age” are going to need. While it is not yet clear exactly what this type of education might look like, it is clear that it will be different from the current system. One framework used to differentiate between these kinds of education is the evolution of education from Education 1.0 to Education 2.0 and 3.0 (Keats & Schmidt, 2007). Education 1.0, like Web 1.0, is considered to be largely a one-way process. Students “get” knowledge from their teachers or other information sources. Education 2.0, as defined by Keats and Schmidt, happens when Web 2.0 technologies are used to enhance traditional approaches to education. New interactive media, such as blogs, social bookmarking, etc. are used, but the process of education itself does not differ significantly from Education 1.0. Education 3.0, by contrast, is characterised by rich, cross-institutional, cross-cultural educational opportunities. The learners themselves play a key role as creators of knowledge artefacts, and distinctions between artefacts, people and processes become blurred, as do distinctions of space and time. Across these three “generations”, the teacher’s role changes from one of knowledge source (Education 1.0) to guide and knowledge source (Education 2.0) to orchestrator of collaborative knowledge creation (Education 3.0). The nature of the learner’s participation in the learning also changes from being largely passive to becoming increasingly active: the learner co-creates resources and opportunities and has a strong sense of ownership of his or her own education. In addition, the participation by communities outside the traditional education system increases. Building from this framework, we offer our own “framework for future-oriented science education” (see Figure 1). In this framework, we present two continua: one reflects the nature of student participation (from minimal to transformative) and the other reflects the nature of community participation (also from minimal to transformative). Both continua stretch from minimal to transformative participation. Minimal participation reflects little or no input by the student/community into the direction of the learning—what is learned, how it is learned and how what is learned will be assessed. Transformative participation, in contrast, represents education where the student or community drives the direction of the learning, including making decisions about content, learning approaches and assessment.

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  • Matamata Piako District: Demographic Profile 1986 - 2031

    Jackson, Natalie; Pawar, Shefali (2013-03)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report outlines the demographic changes that have occurred in Matamata -Piako District, as well as what trends are expected in the future.

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  • Hawke's Bay Region: Demographic Profile 1986 - 2031

    Jackson, Natalie (2012-02)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report outlines the demographic changes that have occurred in Hawke's Bay Region, as well as what trends are expected in the future.

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  • Bay of Plenty Region and its Territorial Authorities: Demographic Profile 1986 - 2031

    Jackson, Natalie; Rarere, Moana; Pawar, Shefali (2013-12)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report outlines the demographic changes that have occurred in Bay of Plenty Region, as well as what trends are expected in the future.

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  • 2014 Fieldays in Hamilton: Economic impacts for the Waikato Region and New Zealand

    Hughes, Warren (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The 2014 Fieldays event over 11 –14 June attracted 119,892 gate entries which was 4.2% lower than in 2013. For the 2014 event, a total of 942 firms exhibited their goods and services (up 4.9% over 2013) including 71 overseas firms (+109%) using a total of 1366 exhibitor sites (+4.8%).

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  • Te Ao Hurihuri population: Past, present & future

    Kukutai, Tahu; Rarere, Moana (2014-07)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The NIDEA Te Ao Hurihuri series uses data from the New Zealand Census of Population and Dwellings to examine key aspects of Maori population change.

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  • Western Bay of Plenty District: Demographic Profile 1986 - 2031

    Jackson, Natalie; Rarere, Moana (2014-05)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report outlines the demographic changes that have occurred in Western Bay of Plenty District, as well as what trends are expected in the future.

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  • Aquatic ecology of Lake Rotokare, Taranaki, and options for restoration

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Bell, Dudley G.; Duggan, Ian C.; Wood, Susanna A.; Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Rotokare is a 17.8-ha natural lake in eastern Taranaki, located 12 km east of Eltham in the 230-ha Rotokare Scenic Reserve. In 2008, the Rotokare Scenic Reserve Trust completed construction of an 8.2-km predator proof fence around the reserve. Frequent algal blooms in summer have led to long periods of lake closure to boating and contact recreation. As there are few lakes in the Taranaki region, these closures are a nuisance to the local community. The objectives of this study were to quantitatively survey the fish community of the lake and to evaluate the lake water quality for the Rotokare Scenic Reserve Trust for the purpose of advising on options for lake restoration. Water quality has not deteriorated since 1976-1980, and, if anything, has improved. Secchi disc depth in 2013 (1.95 m) was very similar to measurements in summer 1980 (mean 1.93 m on 30 January 1980). Mean dissolved reactive phosphorus (± 95% confidence interval) was greater in 1976 (190±50 mg/m³) than mean phosphate concentration in 2013 (93±31 mg/m³, p < 0.05, Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample test). The thermocline was deeper in 2013 at 6-7 m compared to 3-4 m in 1977. This indicates that a much greater volume of the lake was oxygenated in February 2013 than in February 1977. Also, the intensity of stratification was less in 2013, as the dissolved oxygen concentration below the thermocline was 21027% compared to just 3% in 1977. This suggests that an improvement in water quality has occurred, probably as a result of stock exclusion. To sample the fish community, boat electrofishing was used at the total of six sites. The total length fished was 1,656 m, which was 6,624 m² in area. Eighty minutes of boat electrofishing caught 234 fish (217 perch, 16 shortfin eels, and 1 longfin eel). Fishing at night showed a 16-fold increase in the catch rate of perch (125 fish/10 min of fishing) compared to fishing during the day (8 fish/10 min of fishing). Perch dominate the fish community in Lake Rotokare and the biomass and density of eels are low, which is unusual for Taranaki water bodies. The mean density of perch was 4.49 fish/100 m², and the mean density for eels was 0.29 fish/100 m². The lower eel density may be a result of impaired access for eels or may be the result of predation by perch on migrant juvenile eels. There have been changes in the zooplankton community since 1980. The North American invader Daphnia galeata was not found in 1980, and appears to have now replaced the cladoceran Bosmina meridionalis and copepod Boeckella sp. We also found a diverse rotifer community.

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