26 results for University of Waikato, Unclassified

  • Review: The Intricate Art of Actually Caring

    Houlahan, Mark (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    It was a cold and rainy week. Two boys from Wellington bought their stylish road play to Hamilton. Meanwhile, back in Wellington, Ian McKellen bought his own fame back to Wellywood to stage Waiting for Godot, the biggest road play of them all.

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  • Review: Salon

    Houlahan, Mark (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Salon was a welcome local attempt at exploiting the theatre potential of non-traditional theatre spaces. A salon is a great choice: so much potential for narcissism and display. The hot lights, the big mirrors. Everything is on display.

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  • Pest Fish Control - Fact Sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Collier, Kevin J.; Hicks, Brendan J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Due to their negative impacts on water quality and native biodiversity in New Zealand, regional councils have included a number of introduced freshwater fish species such as koi carp, rudd, brown bullhead catfish, goldfish, tench, gambusia (mosquitofish) and European perch (Figure 1) in their pest management plans. The Department of Conservation and regional councils undertake control and eradication programmes around New Zealand every year in order to contain their spread and reduce their impacts. Nearly all regions of mainland New Zealand have at least one of these species but they are most prevalent in the Auckland and Waikato regions. LERNZ has been researching the population ecology and capture methods of pest fish populations in order to develop efficient methods for their control.

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  • New Zealand pest fish species: Koi carp and Gambusia – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    New Zealand has a total of about 36 native freshwater fish species, and a further 22 (39% of all freshwater fish) have been introduced from overseas. Like all introduced species, they have some impact on New Zealand's native ecosystems, but some cause more problems than others.

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  • Flocculation and sediment capping – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Paul, Wendy J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Sediment capping and flocculation are in-lake techniques designed to reduce internal nutrient loads from the bottom sediments of lakes. These loads are roughly equivalent in magnitude to external loads. Case studies of the Rotorua lakes (Figure 1) show that with careful design and management, sediment capping and flocculation can reduce nutrient concentrations and the likelihood of algal blooms. Relevant actions can include: (i) reducing bioavailable phosphorus in stream inflows through continuous addition of the active material to the stream, (ii) removing bioavailable phosphorus, and flocculation and sedimentation of nutrients, and (iii) altering sediment composition so that nutrients are more efficiently retained within the bottom sediments

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  • Exclusion and removal of pest fish from Lake Ohinewai – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Ling, Nicholas; Daniel, Adam Joshua (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Many of the shallow lakes in the lower Waikato River floodplain have significantly degraded water quality as a result of nutrient and sediment enrichment from non-point sources. Pest fish species such as koi carp, goldfish, and catfish have exacerbated lake decline by resuspending lake sediments and uprooting submerged macrophytes. This this resulted in a collapse of submerged macrophytes and progression from clear-water oligotrophic state to a eutrophic (algal-dominated) state.

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  • Destratification – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Paul, Wendy J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    During summer, the surface waters of lakes warm and become less dense than the colder bottom waters. This process is known as stratification and prevents surface and bottom water mixing. Stratification can occur intermittently in shallower lakes or for up to 9 months in deeper lakes (Figure 1). Under natural conditions stratification normally breaks down during the winter months when surface temperatures equilibrate with the bottom of the lake.

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  • Legal status of Rudd, Catfish, Goldfish – fact sheet

    Collier, Kevin J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    New Zealand has a total of about 36 native freshwater fish species, and a further 22 species (equivalent to 38% of all freshwater fish species) have been introduced from overseas. Like all introduced species, they have some impact on New Zealand's native ecosystems, but some cause more problems than others.

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  • LERNZdb Freshwater Database – fact sheet

    Parshotam, A. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    The LERNZdb Freshwater Database is a repository for freshwater quality data and biodiversity measurement data for lakes, rivers and wetlands in New Zealand. It was developed as part of the Lake Ecosystem Restoration New Zealand (LERNZ: LERNZ.co.nz) programme in co-operation between the Information & Technology Services Division (ITS) and LERNZ researchers at the University of Waikato. LERNZdb has the ability to store a wide variety of freshwater data in a consistent format, it also scores the quality of the data based on the provided quality controlled information. This allows the user to filter data based on the standard of data collection and encourages the provision of high quality data for use in modelling applications.

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  • Invasive fish and nutrients – fact sheet

    Hicks, Brendan J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Invasive fish such as koi (or common) carp (Cyprinus carpio) are large fish as adults (typically 1-3 kg) and can exist at high biomass (commonly 1000-2000 kg/ha). Because of their large size, high biomass, and suctorial feeding behaviour that disturbs the lake bed, koi carp have the potential to contribute a significant amount of plant nutrients (nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)) to lake waters. To estimate the potential of koi carp to inhibit lake restoration, we estimated the rates of excretion relative to other processes contributing nutrients to lakes.

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  • Remote sensing of water quality – fact sheet

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Allan, Mathew Grant (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Evaluating water quality is a key tool in lake management. Typically water quality samples are restricted to a limited number of point samples collected in situ in the field, which can be time consuming and costly. Also, the few in situ points sampled fail to capture the spatial variability, e.g., for the large Lake Waikare (3,400 ha; Figure. 1).

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  • Genetic tools – fact sheet

    Hogg, Ian D. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Morphological identification of organisms can be challenging and often requires specialist knowledge to ensure accurate identifications especially, if specimens are microscopic, as is the case with zooplankton (Figure 1). It can also be challenging to know what species of fish or other taxa are in a lake or waterway without extensive surveys. For these reasons, LERNZ has been developing the use of genetic tools for species identification.

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  • Whole-lake fish removal – fact sheet

    Hicks, Brendan J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    A central objective of our lake restoration research was to remove invasive fish from 5 lakes of >5 ha in area to restore indigenous biodiversity. We chose a variety of lakes with dominant invasive fish species ranging from goldfish to perch and koi carp (Figure 1 and Table 1). Because of the priority accorded to Lower Karori Reservoir by end users we relaxed the original criterion of> 5 ha lake area. We fished with a variety of fishing methods (boat electrofish ing, fyke and seine netting, and feeder (pod) trapping).

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  • Effects of introduced fish on zooplankton – fact sheet

    Duggan, Ian C. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Zooplankton are small animals that feed on algae and bacteria in lakes, and are in turn food for small fish. Three major zooplankton groups exist in lakes; the cladocerans and copepods, which are both small crustaceans, and the rotifers (Figure 1). Like other animals, many zooplankton species have naturally distinct geographies, meaning New Zealand has species that are not known from other parts of the world. Many zooplankton species are sensitive to changes in water quality and fish introductions.

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  • Pest fish detection using environmental DNA – fact sheet

    Banks, Jonathan C.; Hogg, Ian D. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Molecular tools using DNA sequencing can improve pest fish management by ensuring accurate identification of fish, especially larval fish, without the need for specialist taxonomic knowledge. DNA is made of four chemicals; guanine (G), adenine (A), thymine (T), or cytosine (C), joined together as a string (Figure 1). The order of the chemicals is unique to each species and can be used as a DNA "barcode" to identify organisms. It is relatively simple to obtain DNA sequences for a reference gene such as the widely accepted "barcode gene" cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1, and compare the sequence to a voucher specimen sequence in genetic databases such as GenBank and the Barcode of Life database BOLD.

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  • Tales of the unexpected: halloysite delivers surprises and a paradox

    Lowe, David J.; Churchman, G. Jock (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Despite being first described nearly 200 years ago, halloysite still has the capacity to surprise. We report here the remarkable discovery in New Zealand of two new morphologies for this 1:1 Si:Al layered aluminosilicate member of the kaolin subgroup. One discovery was entirely serendipitous, thus lending validity to the famous phrase attributed to scientist Isaac Asimov: The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not “Eureka” but “That’s funny...”. Moreover, the recognition of one of the new morphologies of halloysite helped enable a long-standing problem regarding the geotechnical property of sensitivity and its impact on landsliding in the Tauranga region, eastern North Island, to be solved. Such landsliding has commonly been attributed (possibly erroneously) to the dominance of nanocrystalline allophane, the clay commonly associated with halloysite in many weathered pyroclastic sequences and volcanogenic soils in North Island. In this article, we briefly summarise the circumstances and implications of the two discoveries relating to halloysite morphology, one published in Clay Minerals and the other in Geology, and a third study (also in Clay Minerals) relating in part to the formation of halloysite.

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  • On the foreigner

    Arndt, Sonja Kathrina (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Who is ‘the foreigner’? What does it mean, to be a foreigner, and how does foreignness feel, look, or smell? A concrete definition of the foreigner would perhaps belie the very term, so I attempt here to illustrate the notion, calling forth some conceptions, within and around which each of us must continually construct an understanding of foreignness, for ourselves and for those around us. According to the Oxford Dictionary (Oxford Dictionaries, 2015), a foreigner is a person coming from another country, who does not belong to a particular place or group, a stranger, an outsider. Julia Kristeva (1991), in her book Strangers to ourselves, elaborates on these ideas, and says that the foreigner can cause “a choked up rage deep down in my throat”, and be seen as “a black angel clouding transparency” (p. 1). Following this view, the foreigner, stranger, outsider that comes from a very different place, could be seen as someone who causes an unwanted disturbance, or anxiety, in our everyday comfort and routine. While Kristeva’s conception is laden with emotion, both notions identify a foreigner as somebody unfamiliar, unpredictable. The foreigner then, is a stranger, an unknown, an Other.

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  • LERNZ: Lake Ecosystem Restoration New Zealand – Fact Sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Hamilton, David P. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Based at the University of Waikato (Figure 1), the aim of the LERNZ research programme is to provide end-users such as community groups, regional councils and governmental agencies with practical tools and expertise for restoring indigenous biodiversity and water quality in lakes. The research programme is centred around two main themes: • New models and technologies to effectively manage harmful algal blooms • New pest fish management and control technologies LERNZ is based at the University of Waikato, Hamilton New Zealand, and has established a number of collaborations with domestic and international research organisations since its inception in 2005.

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  • Nutrient and sediment loads from farm drains – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Hamilton, David P. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Runoff from intensive agriculture has been identified as a major contributor to the decline of New Zealand's freshwater ecosystems. Excessive nutrient and sediment losses to lakes and rivers lead to reduced water clarity and quality, which in turn leads to reductions in biodiversity and amenity and aesthetic values.

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  • Applying citizen science to freshwater ecosystem restoration – fact sheet

    Peters, Michael A.; Hamilton, David P. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Citizen science describes the diverse ways in which the public participates in scientific investigations. Participation covers a spectrum from sending observations to a project coordinator to designing, implementing protocols, analysing and sharing findings. The popularity of citizen science both for educational and scientific purposes has grown in recent decades. Community volunteers now participate in diverse programmes that investigate the effects of climate change on biota, evolutionary processes, invasive species ecology, and changes in water and air quality (Figure 1).

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