958 results for University of Waikato, 2010

  • Matlab application for fitting progress curves to the Equilibrium Model

    Peterson, Michelle E.; McDowall, James; Goodhue, Nigel David; Bryan, Karin R.; Hailstone, Daniel; Monk, Colin R. (2010)

    Dataset
    University of Waikato

    The general procedures for carrying out the necessary rate determinations required for accurate determination of the Equilibrium Model parameters, and fitting this data to the mathematical model to generate the parameters, are described in "Peterson, M.E., Daniel, R.M., Danson, M.J. & Eisenthal, R. (2007) The dependence of enzyme activity on temperature: determination and validation of parameters. Biochemical Journal, 402, 331-337". It should be borne in mind that the Equilibrium Model equation contains exponentials of exponentials – quite small deviations from ideal behaviour, or a failure to obtain true Vmax values, may lead to difficulty in obtaining reliable Equilibrium Model parameters.

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  • Water governance and water use efficiency: The five principles of WUA management and performance in China

    Wang, Jinxia; Huang, Jikun; Zhang, Lijuan; Huang, Qiuqiong; Rozelle, Scott (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    In recent years China has attempted to reform water management by decentralizing water management responsibilities. The overall goal of our paper is to better understand the emergence of water user associations (WUAs) in China and assess if they are adhering to the practices spelled out by the Five Principles, a set of recommended practices that are supposed to lead to successful WUA operation. Using four sets of different types of villages to examine implementation and performance, we find that World Bank-supported WUA villages ("Bank villages") can be thought of as operating mostly according to the Five Principles. For example, the Bank villages were endowed with a more reliable water supply; were set up and were operating with a relatively high degree of farmer participation; and leaders were more consultative and the process more formal. When WUAs are run according to the Five Principals, we show that WUAs increase water use efficiency. The study also provides evidence that there is a perception in the Bank villages that water management is improving in general and that there is less conflict both within the village and among villages. Perhaps more importantly, we find that the Bank's effort to promote WUAs extended beyond their own project villages. The openness, consultative nature, and transparency found in the Bank WUAs are also found (albeit at a somewhat lower level) in the non-Bank WUA villages.

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  • Book review: The Old Creed and the New. By Don Cupitt

    Walker, Ruth (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Book review: The Old Creed and the New.

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  • The impacts of liquor outlets in Manukau City: Summary report

    Cameron, Michael Patrick; Cochrane, William; McNeill, Kellie; Melbourne, Pania; Morrison, Sandra L.; Robertson, Neville (2010-03)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    There has been significant recent debate over the impact of liquor outlets on communities in New Zealand. This report summarises the key results from a research project undertaken between 2008 and 2010. Media analysis and research with community stakeholders confirm that the issue is a focus of concern among communities in New Zealand. In Manukau City, off-licence liquor outlets tend to be located in areas of high social deprivation and high population density, while on-licence liquor outlets tend to be located in main centres and areas of high amenity value. Higher off-licence density is associated with lower alcohol prices and longer opening hours. The density of both off-licence and onlicence liquor outlets is associated with a range of social harms, including various police events and motor vehicle accidents. However, these results are context specific and care should be taken in applying them to other locations.

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  • Review: Hidden markets: the new education privatization

    Thrupp, Martin (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Book review of Hidden markets: the new education privatization.

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  • Review: Steal Away Boy: Selected poems of David Mitchell

    Locke, Terry (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    In 1985, out of a job and mouths to feed I was offered a reprieve by Jim Tully, then an editor at the Auckland Star, who suggested that I might work as a proof-reader at the newspaper. David Mitchell was one of my workmates. We exchanged few words, though we were acquainted with each other. Having read the editor’s introduction to Steal Away Boy: Selected poems of David Mitchell, I can see that he had begun a retreat into silence, into the kind of strategic withholding of self which appears to have characterised his relationship with editors who sought to pin his poems sprawling to some page or other. In this respect, Edmond and Roberts have done a superb job in enticing Mitchell out of the tomb.

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  • Book Review: Essentials of life-span development

    Stanley, Peter (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Book review of Essentials of life-span development, by John Santrock, New York, McGraw-Hill, 2008.

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  • Review: Extrusion processing and properties of protein-based thermoplastics

    Verbeek, Casparus Johan R.; van den Berg, Lisa E. (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Increasing interest in competitive, sustainable, and biodegradable alternatives to petroleum-based plastics has encouraged the development of protein-based plastics. The formation of a homogeneous protein melt during extrusion occurs through: denaturation, dissociation, unraveling, and alignment of polymer chains. The presence of covalent cross-links is unfavorable, decreasing chain mobility, increasing viscosity and preventing homogenization. Proteins have high softening temperatures, often above their decomposition temperatures. To avoid degradation, the required chain mobility is achieved by plasticizers. By understanding a protein's physiochemical nature, additives can be selected that lead to a bioplastic with good processability. The final structural and functional properties are highly dependent on the protein and processing conditions.

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  • Is there a lack of science resources and specialists for kaiako at Kura reo o Waikato?

    Hopkins, Aareka (2010-08)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The New Zealand debates on culture and science education for Maaori are grounded in the concern for the under-achievement of tauira in science. In 1995, a lack of subject experts, specialists and resources to implement the Ministry of Education’s science curriculum was identified. I investigated the concept of a mobile science laboratory to provide subject experts, specialists and resources to Kura Reo o Tainui as a way of improving and enhancing tauira literacy and engagement in puutaiao. This study used a semi-structured survey to elicit the whakaaro and perceptions of kaiako puutaiao from four Wharekura, three Kura Kaupapa Maaori, and three Rumaki Total Immersion classes in Waikato-Tainui, using registered participants in the inaugural Kura Reo o Tainui Waananga in 2008 to select survey participants.

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  • An introduction to ethical consideration in international environmental law

    Gillespie, Alexander (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this chapter is to give the reader an overview of where some of the ethical debates in international environmental law are currently found. This chapter builds upon my earlier work in this area, which is contained in “International Environmental Law, Policy and Ethics”.

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  • Book review: Emperor Qianlong: Son of Heaven, Man of the World

    Beattie, James John (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book: “Emperor Qianlong: Son of Heaven, Man of the World”, by Mark C. Elliott.

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  • Determination of EDTA in dairy wastewater and adjacent surface water

    Xie, Congmin Zoe; Healy, Terry R.; Robinson, Peter; Stewart, Kevin (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    An HPLC-UV analytical method was developed to determine ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in dairy wastewater and surface water. The optimizing separation was achieved by reversed–phase ion-pair liquid chromatography on a C18 column using methanol as mobile phase solvent, tetrabutylammonium bromide as the ion-pair reagent in pH 3.3 formate buffer solution at a flow rate of 0.9 mL min⁻¹ with a UV detector at 265 nm. No interference of Ca, Mg or NO₃⁻ was detected. Method performance was evaluated in terms of linearity, repeatability and reproducibility. The method detection limit was 5 µg L⁻¹. The contents of EDTA in dairy effluents were 72 ~ 261 µg L⁻¹ at a large dairy site. A change of EDTA concentration was observed downstream of the dairy effluent discharge, but this was well under the predicted no effect concentration for aquatic ecosystem

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  • Can the goldfish see the water? A critical analysis of ‘good intentions’ in cross-cultural practice

    Ferguson, Bruce; Bruce Ferguson, Pip (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    We claim to hold values that our students are responsible and autonomous adults whose success in our courses is best facilitated by our understanding of and respect for their specific backgrounds. We wish to be judged on these values by feedback provided by our students and those with whom we work. However, how well, if ever, are we able to ‘see the water,’ the cultural conditioning that leads us to act in ways that seem supportive of our students to us, but may be perceived differently by them? In this paper, we present conflicting evidence around perceptions of our practice. We discuss where things have gone well, and where interventions have possibly been traumatic for the recipients. We question whether, and how, our practice cross-culturally can be safe. We challenge ourselves and others to think carefully about our responsibilities to our students, whether our privileged positioning obliges us to share and if so, how that sharing can occur in ways that validate and equally respect the values of those with whom we work.

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  • Maori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2009

    Rua, Mohi; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2010)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Annual report of the Maori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2009. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community.

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  • Missing men and unacknowledged women: Explaining gender disparities in New Zealand’s prime adult age groups 1986 – 2006

    Bedford, Richard; Callister, Paul; Didham, Robert (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Questions concerning the widening disparity in numbers of males and females in the prime working age groups in New Zealand’s population have attracted attention from researchers and the media in recent years. This paper reviews some of the findings from research for a FRST-funded programme that has been investigating several inequalities based on gender and ethnicity in New Zealand’s population. The analysis here complements and extends that in our paper published in the New Zealand Population Review in May 2006. Our main finding is that a complex combination of issues related to the way our stock (census) and flow (arrival/departure) data are used to compile population estimates (the base for population projections), have contributed to exaggerating apparent gender disparities in the 20-49 year age groups at successive censuses. There is no single explanation for this, and the main new finding from our analysis is that gender disparities in the prime adult age groups in New Zealand’s population are as much a function of ‘unacknowledged women’ as of ‘missing men’.

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  • Teacher-researcher relationships and collaborations in research.

    Cowie, Bronwen; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Moreland, Judy; Jones, Alister; Cooper, Beverley; Taylor, Merilyn (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    To understand the complexity of the classroom in ways that might inform teaching research in needed that explains both why and how something works. Teacher-researcher collaboration is essential if this is to happen. Collaborative work can ensure that research builds on from what teachers know and can do. Researchers working with teachers to address their current concerns are more likely to generate insights into what teachers might do and where they might go next. Collaboration can contribute a warrant for relevance for research findings. At the same teachers deepen and enhance their own practice through engaging in the research process. This paper describes and discusses some approaches to collaboration that have enables researchers and teachers to access a diversity of ideas and expertise to their mutual benefit.

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  • Introduction to special edition.

    McGee, Clive; Cooper, Beverley (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This special issue of the Waikato Journal of Education arose from a symposium held at The University of Waikato in June, 2009. The symposium, Initial Teacher Education and the New Zealand Curriculum–Te Marautanga o Aotearoa Symposium, was attended by delegates from all major initial teacher education (ITE) providers in New Zealand. ITE refers to pre-service teacher education, that is, programmes that prepare student teachers to become beginning teachers. Curriculum includes the school and the ITE curriculum.

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  • Editorial

    Bell, Beverley (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The article discusses various reports published within the issue including one by Beverley Bell on the use of theorizing in data analysis, the views on cross cultural research, and the collaboration between teachers and their students.

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  • Leader aspirations and job satisfaction: The moderating effect of leadership position

    Roche, Maree A.; Haar, Jarrod M. (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Self Determination Theory (SDT) asserts aspirations (life goals) of personal growth, relationship and community (intrinsic aspirations) support wellbeing, whereas aspirations for wealth, image and fame (extrinsic aspirations) is detrimental. The following study explores aspirations on a sample of 386 leaders towards job satisfaction, and also testing the differences by leadership position (senior and junior). Findings show that all aspirations are related to job satisfaction, with extrinsic aspirations negatively related and intrinsic aspirations positively. Regression analysis showed that significant predictors were image aspirations (negatively) and personal growth aspirations and relationships aspirations (positively). In addition, the majority of interaction effects were significant showing that senior leaders enjoyed greater job satisfaction than junior leaders, regarding most aspirations. This study is important as it highlights the positive nature of intrinsic aspirations and the negative influence of extrinsic aspirations. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of a senior leadership position for leveraging aspirations towards superior job satisfaction.

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  • Social capital and regional social infrastructure investment: Evidence from New Zealand

    Roskruge, Matthew James; Grimes, Arthur; McCann, Philip; Poot, Jacques (2010)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    In this paper we link unique data on local social infrastructure expenditure with micro-level individual survey data of self-reported social capital measures of trust and participation in community activities. We use both probit and tobit models to estimate the impact of social infrastructure expenditure on social capital formation. Our results imply that the links between social capital, demographic characteristics, human capital, geography and public social infrastructure investment are rather more subtle and complex than much of the literature implies. While we find evidence in support of many of the hypothesized relationships discussed in the social capital literature, our results also suggest that the impact of public social infrastructure investment is affected by both selection effects and free rider processes.

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