10,728 results for University of Waikato

  • Efficient quantile regression for heteroscedastic models

    Jung, Yoonsuh; Lee, Yoonkyung; MacEachern, Steve N, (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Quantile regression (QR) provides estimates of a range of conditional quantiles. This stands in contrast to traditional regression techniques, which focus on a single conditional mean function. Lee et al. [Regularization of case-specific parameters for robustness and efficiency. Statist Sci. 2012;27(3):350–372] proposed efficient QR by rounding the sharp corner of the loss. The main modification generally involves an asymmetric ℓ₂ adjustment of the loss function around zero. We extend the idea of ℓ₂ adjusted QR to linear heterogeneous models. The ℓ₂ adjustment is constructed to diminish as sample size grows. Conditions to retain consistency properties are also provided.

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  • Enhancing Information Literacy: A Practical Exemplar

    Graham, Jeanine; Parsons, Kathryn (2003)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This case-study outlines a teaching partnership between library and academic staff at the University of Waikato. It describes the strategies adopted to develop greater student information literacy and knowledge of source materials; and demonstrates the inter-relationship between student assignments and library resourcing. Both achievements and areas of difficulty are discussed.

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  • Palaeolimnological studies on Lake Maratoto, North Island, New Zealand

    Green, John D. (1979)


    University of Waikato

    The Middle Waikato (or Hamilton) Basin is a promising area for studies of the postglacial history of Northern New Zealand. The major geomorphological features of the basin were developed in the last 40,000 years, mainly by aggradation of the ancestral Waikato River (Mccraw 1967, Hume et al 1975) and in the process a number of peat bogs and small lakes were formed which now provide suitable locations for palaeoclimatic and palaeoecological investigations. Four pollen diagrams from peats in the area have been published (Harris 1963, McGlone et al 1978) which show similar features to diagrams from elsewhere in the North Island (McGlone and Topping 1979) but there have been no comparable studies of sediments from the lakes.

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  • On the Matter of Kava: From the Past to the Present to the Future

    Māhina, Hūfanga ‘Ōkusitino (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Paradoxically, it is thought that people in Tonga specifically and the Moana Pacific generally walk forward (‘alu ki mu‘a) into the past (kuongamu‘a “age-in-the-front”) and, at the same timespace, walk backward (‘alu ki mui) into the future (kuongamui “age-in-the-back”), both taking place in the present (kuongaloto “age-in-the-middle”), where both the elusive, already-taken-place past and the illusive, yet-to-take-place future are constantly mediated in the ever-changing, conflicting present. Historically, it simply means that because the past (kuohili “that-which-has-come-to-pass”) has stood the test of timespace, it must be brought to the front (mu‘a) of people as guidance and because the future (kaha‘u “that-which-is-yet-to-come”) is yet to take place, it must be brought to the back (mui) of people, informed by their refined past knowledge, skills and experiences, both taking place in the present (lotolotonga “that which is the here-and-now”), where they are permanently negotiated in the social process. (Tā-Vā (Time-Space) Philosophy/Theory of Reality). This paper makes a serious attempt to critically examine the matter of kava in its multifarious dimensions from a tavaist philosophical or theoretical perspective. In doing so, it strictly calls for the systematic adoption of a logical, total rather than an illogical, partial approach to the matter of kava, justly critiquing it in the broader context of the time-space (tā-vā), form-content (fuo-uho) and functional (‘aonga) relationships between the past, present and future. Given that the matter of kava is both physical and social in nature, it therefore requires that it be reflected upon totally and not partially, focusing on the temporal-formal, spatial-substantial and functional relationships between plant (‘akau) and body (sino), specifically those relating to their bio-chemical, molecular biological, and narcotic properties. These are then projected both actually and symbolically beyond the realm of the physical to the domain of the social, where a range of lasting social institutions of immense intellectual, cultural, political, artistic and now economic significance have been established. By broadly situating the matter of kava in the plural, cultural, collectivistic, holistic and circular context of the past, present and future, by virtue of their coexistence and continuity as intersecting or connecting and separating physical and social tendencies, it is hope that we can have a clear sense of its historical and ceaseless transformation over time and space as a human concept and practice. This includes the increasing economic appropriation and exploitation of kava by multinational pharmaceutical companies on a large scale, in view of their total established physical and social attributes in reality as in nature, mind and society, where the truly controversial issue of biological, intellectual and cultural property ownership is introduced into the existing equation, theoretically and practically problematised by a sense of globalism, commercialism and legalism.

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  • Tongan men talk when the language (talanoa) and context (faikava) are Tongan

    Vaka, Sione (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    In Tongan society, Tongan males have the authority, while Tongan females hold the senior ranks in society. Other roles and responsibilities, including father, leader, provider, protector, negotiator, communicator, mentor and so forth, are also expected of Tongan males. Tongan men understand that these roles and responsibilities are to be performed effectively and held in high regard as they represent their father, grandfather, family, kāinga, village, and the Kingdom of Tonga. Despite the many tasks assumed by Tongan males, they are struggling to communicate, and have difficulty disclosing sensitive matters. Moving to New Zealand also introduces new challenges with a new environment, culture, technology, language, and ways of living. This paper focuses on talanoa with Tongan men around smoking in a faikava setting in Auckland. The information discussed in this chapter was generated by four different faikava groups that were hold at local churches in the Auckland area. During the talanoa, the men also discussed their roles and responsibilities and how these influenced their decisions.

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  • Faikava Navigation: Space for critical discussions about identity in diaspora

    Hernandez, Daniel (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This presentation explores a broad sense of diaspora drawing from both Mayan and Tongan concepts of time and space to explore these experiences. Additionally, Lucky Dube's song, The Other Side, is used as a framework for analyzing some comments from ethnographic data of Tongan and Moana (Oceanic) people commenting on struggles for identity. Kava circles serve as significant sites of making and keeping connections to homeland as well as creating spaces of interdependent support to face economic challenges in new homelands.

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  • The cultural classroom: The faikava as an epistemological site for teaching and learning

    Fehoko, Edmond S. (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    My Masters research explored the experiences and perceptions of New Zealand-born Tongan males who participate in the faikava (kava-drinking). The faikava is a well-known ceremonial cultural practice that in recent times has been adapted as an informal and recreational activity embedded in the activities of some churches and other agencies in Tongan migrant communities in New Zealand, Australia and in the United States of America. This cultural practice includes aspects of socialising, sharing and talking, social bonding and fostering camaraderie. For my study, the faikava was the vehicle for my data collection. This presentation will argue the value of the faikava as an epistemological site which provides New Zealand- born Tongan males with the opportunity to reinforce their knowledge of the anga fakatonga (Tongan culture) protocols and language and to engage in discussion about issues of concern to Tongan people today. Drawing on this, I will share my experience in researching in a gendered, social and cultural space in a predominant male practice.

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  • My experience as a female Tongan kava drinker

    Ma’u, Ikanamoe (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This presentation explains the cultural values and social significance of faikava from a Tongan female’s perspective. Tongan woman kava use is a present although often hidden and controversial practice. Because of this, Ikanamoe’s presentation was picked up and reported on by the media (http://www.radionz.co.nz/international/pacific-news/330400/drinking-kava-becoming-popular-with-tongan-women).

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  • Libation and sacrifice in the Samoan ‘ava ceremony

    Refiti, Albert L. (2017)


    University of Waikato

    This presentation is an analysis of Samoan oral stories connected to the ‘ava ceremony. These foundational stories have an important connection to the role blood sacrifice played in pre ‘ava and post ‘ava Samoa. Dr Refiti argues that the ‘ava ceremony replaced the actual killing of people in religious ceremonies that were required in former times to make sacred important communal spaces. This he shows relates to libation as an offering to the memories of the dead by spilling ‘ava on the ground as a sacrificial prayer or aso that mark and re-memorialise the past in honouring the bones of the dead and sacrificed victim. ‘Ava foundational stories also provide us with clues that the ‘ava plant was brought to Samoa by brothers from Fiti (Fiji) and later the ‘ava ceremony as we know it today was brought to Samoa by the Tagaloa clan which included the aumaga (kava chewers), the tauaga strainer and the use of the taupou (village maiden) as the stand-in for the old priest to distribute the ‘ava. The roles of the aumaga and taupou mirror that of the sacrificer and sacrificial victim. Sacrifice and the ‘ava ceremony, Dr Refiti I contends, was required to mark, command and bring the passage of time and space to a stop so that people and roles can be redistributed allowing the community to grow and extend (tupu). The main role of sacrifice, as Valeri states, is “the transformation of the community from a lesser state which is indexed by disorder and pollution to a higher more complete state associated with order and purity” (Valeri, V. (1985). Kingship and Sacrifice: Ritual and society in ancient Hawaii (P. Wissing, Trans.). Chicago, ILL: University of Chicago Press).

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  • Kava Haus Ltd: Distributor of innovative kava products

    Hau, Koloa (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Koloa Hau presents on why and how Kava Haus Ltd was created, where he see opportunities in the marketplace and the challenges ahead. The presentation also showcases current kava products from overseas manufacturers that have innovated kava into an off-the-shelf commercial product.

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  • Social support and social undermining as explanatory factors for health-related quality of life in people living with HIV/AIDS

    Oetzel, John G.; Wilcox, Bryan; Archiopoli, Ashley; Avila, Magdalena; Hell, Cia; Hill, Ricky; Muhammad, Michael (2014)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This study aimed to examine the influence of social support (from personal networks and health care providers) and social undermining (from personal networks) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL; general health perceptions, physical functioning, and depression). Specifically, the authors aimed to identify the nature of the effects (direct, mediating, or moderating) of social support and social undermining on HRQOL. A total of 344 people living with HIV/AIDS and who were patients in a federally funded clinic in New Mexico completed a self-report survey questionnaire. The major findings of this study are the following: (a) social support and social undermining had direct and indirect effects on HRQOL—there was no evidence of a moderating effect of social support and social undermining; (b) for direct effects, social undermining was a stronger predictor of HRQOL than social support with social support variables having positive relations and social undermining variables having negative relations with HRQOL; and (c) for indirect effects, providers' social support partially mediated the influence of unstable employment/unemployment and social undermining on HRQOL.

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  • Modelling and simulation: An overview

    McAleer, Michael; Chan, Felix; Oxley, Les (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The papers in this special issue of Mathematics and Computers in Simulation cover the following topics: improving judgmental adjustment of model-based forecasts, whether forecast updates are progressive, on a constrained mixture vector autoregressive model, whether all estimators are born equal: the empirical properties of some estimators of long memory, characterising trader manipulation in a limit-order driven market, measuring bias in a term-structure model of commodity prices through the comparison of simultaneous and sequential estimation, modelling tail credit risk using transition matrices, evaluation of the DPC-based inclusive payment system in Japan for cataract operations by a new model, the matching of lead underwriters and issuing firms in the Japanese corporate bond market, stochastic life table forecasting: a time-simultaneous fan chart application, adaptive survey designs for sampling rare and clustered populations, income distribution inequality, globalization, and innovation: a general equilibrium simulation, whether exchange rates affect consumer prices: a comparative analysis for Australia, China and India, the impacts of exchange rates on Australia’s domestic and outbound travel markets, clean development mechanism in China: regional distribution and prospects, design and implementation of a Web-based groundwater data management system, the impact of serial correlation on testing for structural change in binary choice model: Monte Carlo evidence, and coercive journal self citations, impact factor, journal influence and article influence

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  • Authenticity: A macromarketing perspective

    Kadirov, Djavlonbek; Varey, Richard J.; Wooliscroft, Ben (2014-03)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This investigation argues that authenticity is inherently a macromarketing concept that is linked to how marketers and consumers view themselves and their own status in society. We show that authenticity refers to the marketer’s marketplace condition (mindset) that can be best described as sincere concern for another. We argue that micromarketing as a general phenomenon is rooted in inauthenticity due to the fact that micromarketing practices represent (distressed, decomposed) overreaction to the marketers’ self-embraced narrow view of their own social status (as maximiser of self-interest, profit, growth) that is largely irrelevant – even contradictory – to the crucial goals of society.

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  • Effect of high pressure processing on the conversion of dihydroxyacetone to methylglyoxal in New Zealand mānuka (Leptospermum scoparium) honey and models thereof

    Grainger, Megan N.C.; Manley-Harris, Merilyn; Fauzi, Noor A.M.; Farid, Mohammed M. (2014)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The effect of high pressure processing (HPP) on the conversion of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) to methylglyoxal (MGO) was examined in New Zealand mānuka honey and models thereof. The objective was to confirm that previously reported increases of MGO with HPP treatment originated from conversion of DHA. RP-HPLC was used to quantify DHA, MGO and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) after derivatisation with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA) or (in the case of MGO) separately with o-phenylenediamine (OPD). Fresh and stored mānuka honey, clover honey with DHA added and artificial 26 honey with DHA added were subjected to nine different pressures and holding times and compared to untreated samples. There was no consistent trend of decrease in DHA or increase in MGO for any of the samples with any treatment. Samples showed random change generally within 5–10% of an untreated sample for MGO, DHA and HMF. HPP does not accelerate the conversion of DHA to MGO in honey.

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  • Fishing activity in the Waikato and Waipa rivers

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Allan, Dave G.; Kilgour, Jonathan T.; Watene-Rawiri, Erina M.; Stichbury, Glen; Walsh, Cameron (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this research project is to collate information regarding the recent use of fisheries resources in the Waikato River and Waipa River catchment areas. In particular, the project sought to summarise the commercial, customary, and recreational fishing activity in the catchments of the Waikato and Waipa rivers in the spatial context of recently introduced co-governance areas. These fisheries include, but are not exclusive to, the broad range of aquatic life managed under the Fisheries Act 1996. Such information is required to support management which includes a co-management framework. The research describes the commercial, customary and recreational fisheries including species and quantities taken, fishing methods, and seasonal influences.

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  • Barrett Bush management plan

    Bryan, Catherine Louise (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The current vegetation pattern of Barrett Bush is the result of complex landscape changes of both recent and historic times. The most recent natural landscape changes occurred as the Waikato River meandered across the region, changing course over many years and depositing the alluvial plain that Barrett Bush grows on. More recent landscape changes have been the result of human activity as vegetation clearance and agricultural development has occurred throughout the district. Fortunately, Barrett Bush was set aside and the reserve now provides insight into original vegetation patterns as well as a refuge for biota characteristic of forests dominated by kahikatea. Barrett Bush sits a shallow depression of an alluvial plain with a podocarp vegetation composition that is classed as a kahikatea semi-swamp forest (Clarkson et al. 2007). Clarkson et al. (2007) describe the typical natural vegetation of kahikatea semi-swamp forest: “Semi-swamp forest dominated by kahikatea grew on the poorly drained shallow depressions. Several other species were present in varying amounts, including rimu, matai, pukatea, swamp maire, tawa, pokaka, and occasional cabbage tree. Prominent in the understorey were silver fern, mapou, hangehange, Coprosma areolata, and turepo, and sedges including Hymenophyllum demissum, hen and chicken fern, Astelia fragrans, A. grandis, and Microlaena avenacea.”

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  • Lake Rotokakahi water quality update 1990-2011

    Butterworth, Joseph (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Rotokakahi is an Iwi-owned lake administered by the Lake Rotokakahi Board of Control on Behalf of lake owners who are descendants from the Ngāti Tumatawera and Tūhourangi hapū of Te Arawa. It is mesotrophic (moderate water quality) lake with an area of 4.4 km² comprised of exotic forestry (57.1%), pasture (26.3%) and regenerating indigenous forest/scrub (16.6%).

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  • Book review: Seeds of Empire: The Environmental Transformation of New Zealand

    Beattie, James John (2012)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book: “Book review: Seeds of Empire: The Environmental Transformation of New Zealand”, by Tom Brooking and Eric Pawson.

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  • Observations of wave energy fluxes and swash motions on a low-sloping, dissipative beach

    Guedes, Rafael M. C.; Bryan, Karin R.; Coco, Giovanni (2013-07)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Field observations of swash and ocean waves show that runup saturation at infragravity frequencies (0.025–0.035 Hz) infragravity waves, where typically less than 5% of the (linear) energy flux was reflected from the beach and where, similar to the sea swell band, the swash energy was independent of offshore wave energy. The infragravity frequency range of saturation was determined by the tide, with saturation extending to lower frequencies at low tide when the local beach face slope over the concave-shaped profile was gentler. Runup was strongly dominated by infragravity frequencies, which accounted on average for 96% of the runup variance, and its energy levels were entirely consistent with strong infragravity wave dissipation observed in the surfzone, particularly when including the nonlinear contributions to the wave energy fluxes. The infragravity wave dissipation was strongly associated with breaking of sea swell waves, which abruptly decreased nonlinear transfers to infragravity frequencies and made infragravity dissipation prevail over forcing within the breaking region. Our observations show evidence of nonlinear interactions involving infragravity and high-frequency, harmonic waves and suggest that these harmonics could play a role in the wave energy balance near the shoreline on low-sloping, dissipative beaches.

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  • Chinese Public Attitudes Toward Epilepsy (PATE) scale: translation and psychometric evaluation

    Lim, Kheng Seang; Choo, Wan Yuen; Wu, Cathie; Hills, Michael; Tan, Chong Tin Tan (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    None of the quantitative scale for public attitudes toward epilepsy was translated to Chinese language. This study aimed to translate and test the validity and reliability of a Chinese version of the Public Attitudes Toward Epilepsy (PATE) scale. Methods: The translation was performed according to standard principles and tested in 140 Chinese-speaking adults aged more than 18 years for psychometric validation. Results: The items in each domain had similar standard deviations (equal item variance), ranged from 0.85-0.95 in personal domain and 0.75-1.04 in general domain. The correlation between an item and its domain was 0.4 and above for all, and higher than the correlation with the other domain. Multitrait analysis showed the Chinese PATE had a similar variance, floor and ceiling effects, and relative relationship between the domains, as the original PATE. The Chinese PATE scale showed a similar correlation with almost all demographic variable except age. Item means were generally clustered in the factor analysis as hypothesized. The Cronbach’s α values was within acceptable range (0.773) in the personal domain and satisfactory range (0.693) in the general domain. Conclusion: The Chinese PATE scale is a validated and reliable translated version in measuring the public attitudes toward epilepsy.

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