10,728 results for University of Waikato

  • Book review: Deborah H. Green: The Aroma of Righteousness: Scent and Seduction in Rabbinic Life and Literature.

    Simms, Norman (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book: "The Aroma of Righteousness: Scent and Seduction in Rabbinic Life and Literature", by Deborah H. Green.

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  • Professional learning in the lives of teachers: towards a new framework for conceptualising teacher learning

    Cameron, Sandra; Mulholland, Judith; Branson, Christopher (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This interpretative study of teachers as learners explored the continuing professional learning of teachers in a range of Australian schools. While teacher learning is regarded as a cornerstone of school reform, knowledge of how and why teachers engage in ongoing learning is scant. Research participants completed an open-ended questionnaire about their professional learning experiences and participated in semi-structured interviews in which they shared their learning narratives. The study found three sets of major influences on teachers’ engagement with professional learning and the quality of that learning. These influences were isolation (both geographic and professional), cost (both educational and emotional), and the professional and personal life stages of teachers. A new descriptive framework through which to understand the intricate interconnections between teacher-learners, professional learning and learning contexts across teaching careers is proposed.

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  • Book review: Daniel J. Goldhagen: The Devil that Never Dies: The Rise and Threat of Global Antisemitism.

    Simms, Norman (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book: “The Devil that Never Dies: The Rise and Threat of Global Antisemitism”, by Daniel J. Goldhagen.

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  • Text categorization and similarity analysis: implementation and evaluation

    Fowke, Michael; Hinze, Annika; Heese, Ralf (2013-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    This report covers the implementation of software that aims to identify document versions and se-mantically related documents. This is important due to the increasing amount of digital information. Key criteria were that the software was fast and required limited disk space. Previous research de-termined that the Simhash algorithm was the most appropriate for this application so this method was implemented. The structure of each component was well defined with the inputs and outputs constant and the result was a software system that can have interchangeable parts if required.

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  • Social interactions using an electronic rabbit

    Zaicu, Alexandru Calin; Hinze, Annika (2013-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    In this project we use an electronic rabbit called Karotz, created by French company Violet. The rabbits have the ability to connect autonomously to a WI-FI network. IN this project we use Karotz to record an audio log that will contain sounds of the environment. We also programmed a way for the rabbit to send audio to its other Karotz friend. We explored if Karotz can be used to help people stay in contact with each other and to feel less homesick.

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  • Text categorization and similarity analysis: similarity measure, architecture and design

    Fowke, Michael; Hinze, Annika; Heese, Ralf (2013-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    This research looks at the most appropriate similarity measure to use for a document classification problem. The goal is to find a method that is accurate in finding both semantically and version related documents. A necessary requirement is that the method is efficient in its speed and disk usage. Simhash is found to be the measure best suited to the application and it can be combined with other software to increase the accuracy. Pingar have provided an API that will extract the entities from a document and create a taxonomy displaying the relationships and this extra information can be used to accurately classify input documents. Two algorithms are designed incorporating the Pingar API and then finally an efficient comparison algorithm is introduced to cut down the comparisons required.

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  • Text categorization and similarity analysis: similarity measure, literature review

    Fowke, Michael; Hinze, Annika; Heese, Ralf (2013-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    Document classification and provenance has become an important area of computer science as the amount of digital information is growing significantly. Organisations are storing documents on computers rather than in paper form. Software is now required that will show the similarities between documents (i.e. document classification) and to point out duplicates and possibly the history of each document (i.e. provenance). Poor organisation is common and leads to situations like above. There exists a number of software solutions in this area designed to make document organisation as simple as possible. I'm doing my project with Pingar who are a company based in Auckland who aim to help organise the growing amount of unstructured digital data. This reports analyses the existing literature in this area with the aim to determine what already exists and how my project will be different from existing solutions.

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  • Catching and displaying memory cues for a mobile augmented memory system

    Bellamy, Jake; Hinze, Annika (2013-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    This report goes over and details the progress of the 2013 COMP477 project “Augmenting Memory: The Digital Parrot on Mobile Devices” undertaken by Jake Bellamy and supervised by Annika Hinze at the University of Waikato. The report begins with an overview on the problem with remembering events in people’s lives and details the background information on the Digital Parrot system. It also describes the previous project that preceded this one, which began to conceptualize the Digital Parrot on mobile devices. It analyses problems with the current design of the system and addresses them. The report then goes on to conduct an in depth user study with the functioning version of the software. The user study finds design flaws and incorrect functionality in the application that would not have otherwise been apparent. Finally, the report concludes with a proposed user interface concept that addresses all of the issues found in the user study and describes how the system would work. It describes the initial implementation that has begun in building this system.

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  • Life-history of Lake Horowhenua common smelt: analysis of otolith chemistry and vertebral counts

    Tana, Raymond; Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Horowhenua is a coastal eutrophic lake on the west coast of the North Island. A recent survey of the lake found lower than expected fish diversity but comparatively abundant native fish populations, comprising mostly shortfin and longfin eels (Anguilla australis and A. dieffenbachii). A weir on the outlet of the lake was ifentified as a potential barrier to fish migrations, reducing fish diversity and abundance in the lake. However, large numbers of common smelt (Retropinna retropinna) were collected during this survey, indicating that the population was eighter successfully reproducing in the lake or diadromous, i.e., migrating from the sea. Previous studies have shown that lacustrine common smelt can be distinguished from diadromous populations by differences in counts of vertebrae and gill rakers, and otolith microchemistry. Horizons Regional Council requested that an analysis of smelt otoliths and relevant morphological characteristics be performed to ascertain if the Lake Horowhenua population was diadromous.

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  • Assessment of fish populations in Lake Horowhenua, Levin

    Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Horowhenua (Waipunahau) is of substantial historical, cultural and recreational value to the people of the Horowhenua region. However, water quality and biodiversity within the lake has been in decline for a number of years. As part of lake restoration efforts by Horizons Regional Council and the Lake Horowhenua Trustees, a survey of fish species in Lake Horowhenua was conducted by the University of Waikato using boat electrofishing and fyke netting. A lake restoration plan had previously identified invasive fish species such as koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) and European perch (Perca fluviatilis) as being potential barriers to rehabilitation of the lake. The purpose of this survey was to determine the abundance and diversity of fish species within the lake and to ascertain if pest fish species were present at biomasses high enough to be negatively impacting on lake ecology. Recommendations would then be made as to the potential methods and necessity for pest fish removal.

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  • Fish biomass and gonad development in the Rotopiko (Serpentine) lakes.

    Wu, Nicholas; Daniel, Adam Joshua; Tempero, Grant Wayne

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The Rotopiko (Serpentine) lake complex is one of the Waikato region’s few peat lake systems that contains primarily native aquatic plants. Retaining the natural state of the lakes has been considered a high priority by the Department of Conservation (DOC) and extensive efforts have taken place to prevent nutrient leaching and to control invasive organisms in the lakes. The University of Waikato was contracted to investigate the biomass of introduced and native fish in the Rotopiko lakes in order to determine if the fish removal with rotenone, a chemical piscicide, was required as proposed by DOC. Fish were collected using a variety of traps and nets prior to making and release. Following a dispersal period, each lake was then fished a second time and fish biomass was estimated using a capture-mark-release-recapture study design; population estimates were derived using the Lincoln-Petersen method (Nichols 1992).

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  • Preliminary analysis of boat electrofishing in the Waikato River in the vicinity of the Huntly Power Station: Part 1 - fishing on 2 September 2013

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report gives a basic summary of the first sampling of a three-part monitoring project for Genesis Power Ltd (Genesis) that the University of Waikato is undertaking in close collaboration with National Institute of Water and Environmental Research Institute Atmosphere Ltd (NIWA), Hamilton, Boat electrofishing results will eventually be combined with netting undertaken by NIWA in a final report to Genesis. The boat electrofishing survey took place on 2 September, the objective of which was to undertake the first of three surveys to estimate fish distributions and abundances over key seasons: 1. Early spring 2013 (end August/early September) to target peak trout abundances and cyprinid distributions during cooler months of the year. 2. Summer 2014 (Jan/February) to capture peak summer abundances for target indigenous and exotic species. 3. Winter 2014 (June/July) to target mullet and cyprinid distributions during cooler months of the year. At the surveyed reach is about 80 km from the sea, and at this point the Waikato River is a 7th order river with at a bed elevation of about 19.1 m above sea level. The catchment area upstream is 12,188 km², and the river has a mean flow of 352.3 m³ s⁻¹ and a mean annual low flow of 123.5 m³ s⁻¹ (Freshwater Fish Database Assistant version 6.1, I.G. Jowett).

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  • Sleuths and Spies: the rise of the 'Everywoman' in detective and thriller fiction of the 1920s

    Bydder, Jillene; Franks, Rachel (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The 1920s, frequently referred to as the ‘Roaring Twenties’ or the ‘Jazz Age’, are often associated with opulent lifestyles and the emergence of striking fashion and furniture trends. Themes in the history of women in crime and thriller fiction show, however, that this decade was also a difficult period in the West, one of widespread financial hardship and of living in the shadow of social turmoil: anti-Semitism, conspiracy theories and fear of the foreign dominated the mainstream press as well as popular fiction. It was also a period in which women were working to navigate their way through a society changed forever by the experience of war. This paper examines some of the well-known detective and thriller fiction writers of the 1920s – Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers, John Buchan and William Le Queux – and shows how their characters chart the sexualisation of women as well as women’s resistance to the prevailing views of the day. Fictional women of this period represent ‘Everywoman’: independent and intelligent and, most importantly, sleuths and spies in their own right.

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  • Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana = The confiscation of Tauranga lands. [Volume 1]

    Stokes, Evelyn (1990)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A report providing a historical and geographical overview on the confiscation of Tauranga lands. In two volumes, volume one comprises a narrative of the events described as the raupatu, the confiscation of lands in the Tauranga Moana tribal area under the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863. Volume two is a collection of documents, edited and annotated which were compiled in support of the report. These documents include personal accounts, tribal history, land purchases, lands returned and crown transactions.

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  • Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana : Volume 2, Documents relating to tribal history, confiscation and reallocation of Tauranga lands.

    Stokes, Evelyn (1993)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A report providing a historical and geographical overview on the confiscation of Tauranga lands. In two volumes, volume one comprises a narrative of the events described as the raupatu, the confiscation of lands in the Tauranga Moana tribal area under the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863. Volume two is a collection of documents, edited and annotated which were compiled in support of the report. These documents include personal accounts, tribal history, land purchases, lands returned and crown transactions.

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  • Research, Analysis and Insight into National Standards (RAINS) Project. Second Report: Understanding New Zealand’s Very Local National Standards

    Thrupp, Martin (2013-04)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This is the second report of the Research, Analysis and Insight into National Standards (RAINS) project, a three-year study of the introduction of National Standards into New Zealand primary and intermediate schools.

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  • Research, Analysis and Insight into National Standards (RAINS) Project Final Report: National Standards and the Damage Done

    Thrupp, Martin; White, Michelle (2013-11)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This is the final report of the Research Analysis and Insight into National Standards (RAINS) project, a three-year study of the enactment of the National Standards policy in six diverse primary and intermediate schools. This report provides an overview discussion of the pros and cons of the National Standards policy as experienced by staff, children and parents in the RAINS schools. It summarises the policy and methodological background to the research and the findings of the two previous RAINS reports. The report is also being accompanied by online case studies and other data files.

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  • Feminist theories and practices of lawyering: Legal representation for women who are survivors of domestic violence

    Seuffert, Nan Marie (1995)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The image of a spiral represents the relationship between theory, practices and the experiences of women in the continual project of developing feminist theories. Feminists create tentative theories to explain the experiences of women. These theories inform feminist practices. The practices then lead to new experiences and new interpretations of experiences, which may require new or revised theories. Feminist theories are therefore subject to constant testing in the light of the diverse experiences of women. Each turn on the spiral may require revisiting the same issues; each movement upward on the spiral also represents development of feminist theories towards the goal of more accurately reflecting the diverse experiences of women. The first goal of this project was to consider how feminists develop feminist theories from the experiences of women, considering the relationship between theory and practice in gathering the experiences of women, and in the interpretation and presentation of those experiences. The second goal was to develop feminist theories of lawyering in the area of domestic violence from the experiences of women who are survivors of domestic violence, thereby moving feminist theories of lawyering a full turn on the theory-practice spiral. The theoretical component of the first goal of the project required using feminist theories to inform the gathering and interpretation of the experiences of women with their legal representation. The theoretical component of the second goal required testing current feminist theories of lawyering in light of these experiences. The experiences of women are therefore central to the theoretical aspects of the project. They also provide a focus for the practical aspects of the project: recommendations for lawyers about representing women who are survivors of domestic violence. Perhaps the most significant finding of the research is the frequency with which the women felt that their lawyers did not believe them, especially with respect to the level of danger in which they lived and the severity of the abuse that they endured. Focusing on the disbelief of the lawyers with respect to these aspects of the women's experiences revealed the lawyers' lack of understanding of the dynamics of domestic violence. This finding alone virtually precludes the possibilities for truly ethical lawyer-client relationships in which power is shared and the twoway process of lawyer translation takes place in the context of mutual understanding, respect and a willingness to listen which are required for dialogue. These findings also provide a backdrop to the other issues raised by the research, especially the lack of involvement of the women in decision-making and the lack of advocacy provided to the women. Effective legal representation requires that lawyers be aware of the context in which women seek protection from the legal system, and that lawyers be prepared to assist the women in ensuring their safety by advocating for protection by the legal system throughout the legal process. Lawyers should also be prepared to confront and expose gender bias as it operates in particular cases in a manner that furthers the interests of their clients, and to assist in ensuring that women receive adequate support in using the legal process. The development of feminist theories builds on what we know about women's experiences by producing tentative theories which are tested in light of further experiences. In this project, feminist theories concerning the gathering and interpretation of women's experiences provided the basis for the development of the research methods. The experiences gathered were used to test the recent developments in feminist theories of lawyering. Attention to the situated aspects of experiences resulted in the development of situated theories of feminist lawyering: theories that are relevant to non-Maori women in New Zealand, and that provide a lens through which other women might consider their own theories, practices and experiences.

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  • 'You can't use that bathroom': Transgendering public toilets

    Johnston, Lynda (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This presentation discusses transgender people’s experiences of public toilets. I draw on interviews from my research project ‘Gender Variant Geographies’ to consider the costs of binary gendered – male and female - bathrooms. When public space is rigidly gendered, access and use is a concern for trans and/or gender non-conforming people. There are many gender variant bodies that do not fit a two sex model. There are also people who exhibit gendered characteristics that do not align with the expected performances of their sexed body. I report on findings from interviews with over 20 participants who were asked about their experiences of public toilets. Hostile reactions towards gender transgressions in bathrooms bring into stark relief the performative and material consequences of binary gender norms. Queer and transgender theories are used to analyse: first, ‘the bathroom problem’; second, cisgender privilege; and third, acts of policing gendered bathrooms and bodies.

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  • [Keynote] Feeling in / out of place: Queer geographies of belongings

    Johnston, Lynda (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Thank you for this opportunity to be part of your day. It’s a real honour to be here. I am excited by the theme ‘welcoming diversity’ as it sums up my approach to my professional and personal life. I have a long standing research interest in gender and sexual diverse people and places. At the heart of my approach is a commitment to a politics of difference. My presentation today will highlight this diversity at the levels of our bodies, communities, regions, and globally. I am going to give you a snap shot of research I have conducted over the past couple of decades that connects welcoming (or not welcoming) diversity with embodied feelings of being in / and or / out of place.

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