3 results for Fielding, David, Torres, Sebastian, Working or discussion paper

  • Does Aid Work for the Poor?

    McGillivray, Mark; Fielding, David; Torres, Sebastian; Knowles, Stephen (2011-12-01)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper econometrically examines the impact of aid on the well-being of population sub-groups within 48 developing countries. This is a radical departure from previous empirical research of aid effectiveness at the country level, which has looked mainly at the relationship between aid and national aggregates, per capita GDP growth in particular. A specific concern of the paper is the impact of aid on the wealth, education and health of the poorest. Results indicate that while aid improves the well-being of the poorest groups, it is the richer groups that benefit the most.

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  • Health, wealth, fertility, education and inequality

    Fielding, David; Torres, Sebastian (2005-05)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper uses a new cross-country dataset to estimate the strength of the links between different dimensions of social and economic development, including indicators of health, fertility and education as well as material wellbeing. The paper differs from previous studies in employing data for different income groups in each country in order to provide direct evidence on factors driving inequality, and in using a unique measure of material wellbeing that does not rely on PPP comparisons.

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  • Cows and conquistadors: a comment on the colonial origins of comparative development

    Fielding, David; Torres, Sebastian (2005-05)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Robust estimation of the impact of political institutions on economic development requires the identification of valid instruments for institutional quality. Acemoglu et al. [2001] introduced the use of colonial settler mortality rates as such an instrument. Our paper develops a more eclectic theory of colonial development, and compares the performance of the settler mortality model to alternatives incorporating instruments reflecting the production structure of colonial economies. Ceteris paribus, colonies with a natural comparative advantage in pastoral agriculture were more likely to experience European settlement that led to non-extractive institutions. Some – but not all – of Acemoglu et al.’s conclusions are robust to the use of a wider set of instruments.

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