3 results for Abbas, Saleh

  • Hollow viscus injury in children: Starship Hospital experience

    Abbas, Saleh; Upadhyay, Vipul (2007)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Starship Children's Hospital in Auckland, New Zealand, serves a population of 1.2 million people and is a tertiary institution for pediatric trauma. This study is designed to review all cases of abdominal injury (blunt and penetrating) that resulted in injury of a hollow abdominal viscus including the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, large intestine and urinary bladder. The mechanism of injury; diagnosis and outcome were studied. This was done by retrospective chart review of patients admitted from January 1995 to December 2001. Thirty two injuries were found in 29 children. The age ranged from 7 months to 15 years with boys represented more commonly. Small bowel was the most frequently injured hollow viscus. Computerized Tomography (CT scan) is an extremely useful tool for the diagnosis of HVI.

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  • Prostatic sarcoma after treatment of rectal cancer

    Abbas, Saleh; Hill, Andrew (2007)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. BACKGROUND:The relationship between radiation exposure for treatment of cancer and occurrence of a second primary cancer at the irradiated site is well known. This phenomenon is however rare in prostate.CASE PRESENTATION:A 75-year-old farmer was treated for rectal cancer with preoperative 45 Gy of radiotherapy and abdominoperineal resection. Four years later he developed symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction and acute urinary retention. He underwent a transurethral resection of the prostate. Histological examination of the removed prostate tissue and immunohistochemistry revealed it to be a poorly differentiated sarcoma.CONCLUSION:We believe this to be the first reported case of radiation-induced sarcoma following radiotherapy treatment for rectal cancer. Since radiotherapy plays a pivotal role in the contemporary treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma, it is relevant to be aware of the potential long-term carcinogenic complications of radiotherapy of the pelvis.

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  • The role of water-soluble contrast in the management of adhesive small bowel obstruction

    Abbas, Saleh (2013)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Adhesions are the most common cause of small bowel obstruction (SBO) in western countries. Ninety-three per cent of adhesions are caused by a previous abdominal operation. They are particularly common after colorectal resection and ileal-anal pouch reconstruction. In recent years water soluble media have been demonstrated to help in the diagnosis of bowel obstruction and also in predicting the likely success of nonoperative resolution. Some authors have also suggested a therapeutic value for water-soluble contrast. This aim of this thesis is to investigate the role of water-soluble contrast media in the management of adhesive SBO. An attempt to quantify the burden of adhesive SBO in New Zealand was made by retrospectively reviewing the experience at a major teaching hospital. This was followed by a systematic review and meta-analysis of the published literature. A randomised controlled trial to evaluate the therapeutic role of water-soluble contrast (Gastrografin) in adhesive SBO was then conducted. This was followed by assessment of the impact of routine use of Gastrografin on the management of adhesive SBO. The retrospective review showed that the New Zealand experience is similar to that overseas. The systematic review showed that Oral administration of Gastrografin was safe and when followed by abdominal X-ray helps to triage patients to surgical and no-operative management. It also suggested a therapeutic role in this setting. The randomised controlled trail confirmed that Gastrografin has therapeutic value in adhesive SBO. The final study showed that the routine administration of Gastrografin did not shorten hospital stay probably related to significant breaches of protocol. In conclusion, SBO is a common problem. Gastrografin has an important triage role and hastens resolution of SBO. If Gastrografin is to make an overall difference to SBO management in a hospital then breaches in protocol need to be addressed.

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