2 results for Abbot, NC

  • Professional practices and experiences with complementary medicines: a cross-sectional study involving community pharmacists in England

    Barnes, Joanne; Abbot, NC (2007)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Objective As retailers of complementary medicines (CMs), pharmacists are well placed to advise consumers on the safe and effective use of these products; where CMs are available in pharmacies, pharmacists should be well informed about such products. This study explored the extent to which CMs are available in community pharmacies in England, and examined pharmacists' experiences, professional practices and training with regard to these products. Method A cross???sectional study was conducted, involving a structured questionnaire posted to community pharmacists. Coded follow???up mailings were sent to non???responders after 2 and 4 months, and a reminder telephone call made after 3 months. Setting All community pharmacists in six areas (Devon, Cornwall, Bradford, Leeds, Manchester, Stockport) of England (total n = 1337). Key findings The response rate was 66.5%. Overall, 92% of respondents reported that CMs (excluding vitamins/minerals) are sold in the pharmacy in which they practise, 81% had received requests from patients/consumers for specific CMs in the previous year, and 58% had recommended CMs. Around 70% of respondents rarely/never asks about CMs use when counter???prescribing conventional medicines or when receiving reports of suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with conventional medicines. In total, 40% of respondents had undertaken training in complementary/alternative medicine (CAM). Pharmacists who had undertaken training were more likely to ask patients/consumers specifically about use of CMs when counter???prescribing conventional over???the???counter (OTC) medicines (37.0% versus 23.4%, respectively; ??2 = 17.4; P = 0.0003) and when receiving reports from patients/customers of suspected ADRs associated with conventional (prescribed or OTC) medicines (35.6% versus 23.8%, respectively; ??2 = 13.0; P = 0.0003). Conclusion CMs are widely available in pharmacies in England, and pharmacists interact with users of these products. An opportunity exists for pharmacists to embrace a professional role as expert advisors on CMs. However, pharmacists' training, professional practices and competence with respect to CMs first need to improve.

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  • Hypnotherapy for smoking cessation.

    Abbot, NC; Stead, LF; White, AR; Barnes, Joanne (2000)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background Hypnotherapy is widely promoted as a method for aiding smoking cessation. It is proposed to act on underlying impulses to weaken the desire to smoke or strengthen the will to stop. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of hypnotherapy for smoking cessation. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register and the databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, SCI, SSCI using the terms smoking cessation and hypnotherapy or hypnosis. Date of most recent searches July 2010. There were no language restrictions. Selection criteria We considered randomized controlled trials of hypnotherapy which reported smoking cessation rates at least six months after the beginning of treatment. Data collection and analysis Three authors independently extracted data on participant characteristics, the type and duration of the hypnotherapy, the nature of the control group, smoking status, method of randomization, and completeness of follow up. They also independently assessed the quality of the included studies. The main outcome measure was abstinence from smoking after at least six months follow up. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence in each trial, and biochemically validated rates where available. Those lost to follow up were considered to be smoking. We summarised effects as risk ratios (RR). Where possible, we performed meta-analysis using a fixed-effect model. We also noted any adverse events reported. Main results Eleven studies compared hypnotherapy with 18 different control interventions. There was significant heterogeneity between the results of the individual studies, with conflicting results for the effectiveness of hypnotherapy compared to no treatment, or to advice, or psychological treatment. We did not attempt to calculate pooled risk ratios for the overall effect of hypnotherapy. There was no evidence of a greater effect of hypnotherapy when compared to rapid smoking or psychological treatment. Direct comparisons of hypnotherapy with cessation treatments considered to be effective had confidence intervals that were too wide to infer equivalence. Authors' conclusions We have not shown that hypnotherapy has a greater effect on six-month quit rates than other interventions or no treatment. There is not enough evidence to show whether hypnotherapy could be as effective as counselling treatment. The effects of hypnotherapy on smoking cessation claimed by uncontrolled studies were not confirmed by analysis of randomized controlled trials.

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