4 results for Abbott, William

  • Chronic hepatitis B virus infection in Polynesians

    Abbott, William (1994)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Genetic differences between Polynesians and Europeans may contribute to the many differences in disease frequency that occur between these races. This thesis describes studies that were designed to determine if genetic influences contribute to the high prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Polynesians. Alleles suitable for gene flow measurements were identified and used to find associations between European genes and indices of chronic HBV infection in Polynesians. An ecologic study found a negative association between European genes and the prevalence of chronic HBV infection in five Polynesian ethnic groups (p<0.001). Thus the Vβ7.4 and Vβ5.1 genes may be preferentially used in the human immune response to the HBV and may be an appropriate place to seek polymorphisms that influence the immune response to the HBV and susceptibility to a chronic HBV infection.

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  • Evidence for reduced selection pressure on the hepatitis B virus core gene in hepatitis B e antigen-negative chronic hepatitis B

    Warner, BG; Tsai, Peter; Rodrigo, Allen; Ofanoa, Malakai; Gane, EJ; Munn, Stephen; Abbott, William; others (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Polymorphisms of CARD15/NOD2 and CD14 genes in New Zealand Crohn's disease patients.

    Leung, Yee Fun; Hong, Jiwon; Fraser, Alan; Merriman, TR; Vishnu, P; Abbott, William; Krissansen, Geoffrey (2005)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Polymorphisms in the CARD15/NOD2 gene, which encodes a cytosolic protein involved in bacterial recognition, are associated with development of Crohn's disease (CD). Other potential susceptibility genes such as CD14 may compound the risk of developing CD. We examined the frequency of the three major CARD15 risk alleles (3020insC/L1007fsinsC, G908R and R702W), and a functional polymorphism (-159C/T) in the promoter of the CD14 gene in 185 CD patients in New Zealand and 187 ethnically matched controls. The frequencies of the 3020insC (8.1 vs 0.8%, P < 0.0001), G908R (3.5 vs 2.4%, P = 0.37) and R702W (7.3 vs 5.1%, P = 0.21) alleles in CD patients and controls, respectively, were similar to those described in Australia, and the ancestral countries of Scotland, Ireland and the UK. Only the 3020insC polymorphism was found to be a significant risk factor for CD in our New Zealand cohort (odds ratio = 10.91 [95% confidence intervals 3.30-36.08]; P < 0.0001 for heterozygotes), but not a single patient was homozygous for the 3020insC polymorphism. The T allele (51 vs 50%, P = 0.77) and TT genotype (26 vs 24%, P = 0.84) frequencies of the -159C/T CD14 gene promoter polymorphism did not significantly differ between CD patients and controls. In summary, our findings provide evidence that the CARD15 3020insC risk allele influences disease susceptibility in a small proportion (<17%) of New Zealand CD patients, whereas there was no evidence that the CD14 -159C/T polymorphism is associated with CD.

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  • Associations between HLA class I alleles and escape mutations in the hepatitis B virus core gene in New Zealand-resident Tongans

    Abbott, William; Tsai, Peter; Leung, Yee Fun; Trevarton, A; Ofanoa, Malakai; Hornell, J; Gane, EJ; Munn, Stephen; Rodrigo, Allen (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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