5 results for Adams, J

  • Views About HIV/STI and Health Promotion Among Gay and Bisexual Chinese and South Asian Men Living in Auckland, New Zealand

    Neville, S; Adams, J

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Ethnic minority gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) are considered to have a high risk for HIV infection. The aim of this study was to identify some of the ways Chinese and South Asian MSM talk about and understand issues related to HIV/STI and health promotion, as well as highlighting some of this group's health promoting behaviours. A qualitative study using face-to-face interviews with 44 Chinese and South Asian MSM living in Auckland, New Zealand, was undertaken. Following data analysis, four major themes were identified: the importance of condoms, condom use, HIV/STI practices, and HIV health promotion. The results showed that the men interviewed had a good understanding of the benefits of using condoms for anal sex. They also reported strong recall of the local HIV health promotion campaigns which seek to influence men's behaviours through promotion of a single, unequivocal message to always use a condom for anal sex. The men however did not always report consistent condom use, and a range of reasons why this happened were identified. Among the men who discussed testing practices, regular testing was much more likely to have occurred in men who have lived in New Zealand for more than 5 years. These results suggest that future health promotion initiatives should be tailored to ensure the needs of Chinese and South Asian MSM are appropriately addressed when promoting condom use for anal sex.

    View record details
  • Gay Men Talking About Health: Are Sexuality and Health Interlinked?

    Adams, J; Braun, Virginia; McCreanor, T (2011-09-27)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Defining and describing health has traditionally been the role of medical experts. Although a rich literature has recently established the importance of lay accounts of health, one important gap relates to gay men's accounts of health. Data from 11 focus groups involving 45 gay men were thematically analyzed to investigate gay men's views of health. Two contrasting positions on a possible relationship between sexuality and health-there is no link or there is a definite link-were identified. In addition, five key ways gay men talked about health were identified: health is the absence of disease, is functional ability, is fitness and exercise, is psychological, and is multifaceted. Although there are similarities in the ways gay and other men talk about health, important differences exist, which suggest that issues of sexuality need to be considered by health policy and service planners so that responsive health services can be provided.

    View record details
  • Medical Students and informed consent: A consensus statement prepared by the Faculties of Medical and Health Science of the Universities of Auckland and Otago, Chief Medical Officers of District Health Boards, New Zealand Medical Student Association and the Medical Council of New Zealand

    Bagg, Warwick; Adams, J; Anderson, L; Malpas, Phillipa; Pidgeon, G; Thorn, M; Tulloch, D; Zhong, C; Merry, Alan (2015)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    To develop a national consensus statement to promote a pragmatic, appropriate and unified approach to seeking consent for medical student involvement in patient care. A modified Delphi technique was used to develop the consensus statement involving stakeholders. Feedback from consultation and each stakeholder helped to shape the final consensus statement. The consensus statement is a nationally-agreed statement concerning medical student involvement in patient care, which will be useful for medical students, health care professionals and patients.

    View record details
  • A phase ii study of capecitabine (c), oxaliplatin (o) and bevacizumab (b) using a 2-weekly schedule in previously untreated patients (pts) with advanced, unresectable colorectal cancer (crc) - cancer trials new zealand study 05-6

    Findlay, Michael; Sharples, KJ; Thompson, PI; Perez, DJ; Adams, J; Isaacs, R; Robinson, B; Hinder, Victoria; Pollard, S; O'Donnell, AE (2008-09-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Improved progression-free survival (PFS) in CRC pts has been observed using a modified 2-week CO schedule [Scheithauer et al. J Clin Oncol 2003;21:1307??? 12] and the TREE-2 study indicated that B adds little toxicity to these drugs [Hochster et al. J Clin Oncol 2006;24(18S):3510]. This phase II study determined the feasibility of the combination C (1.75g/m2 BD days 1-7), O and B using a 14-day cycle for pts with advanced, unresectable CRC.

    View record details
  • Perceptions towards lesbian, gay and bisexual people in residential care facilities: A qualitative study

    Neville, SJ; Adams, J; Bellamy, Gary; Boyd, Michal; George, N (2015-03)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Internationally, increases in the numbers of older people will be reflected in larger numbers of more socioculturally diverse groups of older people requiring care provided by residential care facilities. Covert and overt instances of homophobia are evident within residential care services provided to older lesbian, gay and bisexual people. Aims: To explore the perceptions of care staff working in residential care homes towards older lesbian, gay and bisexual people. Design: Critical gerontology formed the methodological foundations for focus group discussions with care staff from seven residential care facilities. Hypothetical vignettes were used to stimulate discussion amongst participants. Results: Thematic analysis of the seven focus group interviews illuminated three themes: ???Knowing me knowing you???, ???Out of sight out of mind??? and ???It's a generational thing???. Subtle as well as not so subtle forms of homophobia were evident in each of the themes. Care staff felt they were largely unprepared to provide care to older lesbian, gay and bisexual people. Conclusion: This small-scale New Zealand study identifies that the residential care sector is not always supportive, or prepared, to provide a care service to those people identifying as lesbian, gay and bisexual. Implications for practice: Findings from this study recommend the implementation of principle-based guidelines, opportunities to participate in ongoing education and partnering with non-heterosexual community organisations in order to provide culturally appropriate care to older lesbian, gay and bisexual people.

    View record details