37 results for Adamson, Carole

  • CSWEANZ : fit & proper survey results

    Hughes, Catherine; Staniforth, Barbara; Adamson, Carole; Hancox, John; McNabb, David (2016-11)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    [2nd slide] Your feedback is important as it will assist us to: 1. Gain a picture of the processes that Schools of Social Work currently use in selection processes and declining applications, as well as ongoing assessment of fit and proper criteria within programmes. 2. Identify the fit and proper issues that emerge for Schools of Social Work. 3. Assist in the preparation of a report for CSWEANZ that will enable Schools to develop a shared understanding of the issues and to participate and contribute to national debate and development. Part ONE of the survey relates to the process of assessing fit and proper criteria on selection of candidates. Part TWO identifies the formal processes your institute engages throughout the four years of social work programme to manage academic performance and disciplinary processes. Part THREE examines the embedded processes of assessment for fit and proper criteria used within the degree.

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  • Bi-cultural Social Work

    Adamson, Carole (2007)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Stress, trauma and critical incidents: the challenge for social work education

    Adamson, Carole (2006)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Growing resilience in health and mental health social workers: innovation in student practice learning, education and post-qualifying development

    Adamson, Carole (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The case for innovative curriculum design aimed at fostering the development of resilience strategie

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  • Book Review: Environmental Social Work

    Adamson, Carole (2013)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Getting the balance right: critical reflection, knowledge and the social work curriculum

    Adamson, Carole (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Social work education in Australia and New Zealand is predominantly embedded within tertiary education systems modelled on university pedagogy. Consolidated by the demand for professionalisation, this location has shaped the social work curriculum into traditional, discipline-based academic courses and delivery. Calls for graduates and practitioners to be robust, resilient and critically reflective have come from employers, the social work profession and educators. This paper acknowledges the impact of external stressors on social work and, within the context of debates over the nature of the social work profession, conceptualises these pressures as a demand on the resilience and reflective capacity of practitioners. Identifying core issues of the need for skills in critical reflection, the lens turns to the construction of the social work curriculum itself. Three models of programme design and curriculum delivery are presented and, using a recently implemented example, questions are raised about the potential for structural change to the curriculum that may enable a central focus upon integrative processes and critical reflection.

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  • Decolonizing Social Work

    Adamson, Carole (2014)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Educating for disaster: Determining the core elements of a disaster curriculum for social work in New Zealand

    Adamson, Carole (2012)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In 2010 and 2011, Aotearoa New Zealand was hit by a number of major disasters involving loss of human life and severe disruption to social, ecological and economic wellbeing. The Pike River mine explosions were closely followed by a sequence of major earthquakes in Christchurch, seismic events that have permanently altered the lives of thousands of people in our third largest city, the closure of the central business district and the effective abandonment of whole residential areas. In early October 2011, the ship, Rena, grounded on a reef off the port of Tauranga and threatened a major oil spill throughout the Bay of Plenty, where local communities with spiritual and cultural connections to the land depend on sea food as well as thrive on tourism. The Council for Social Work Education Aotearoa New Zealand (CSWEANZ), representing all the Schools of Social Work in New Zealand, held a ???Disaster Curriculum??? day in November 2011, at which social workers and Civil Defence leaders involved in the Christchurch earthquakes, the Rena Disaster, Fiji floods and the Boxing Day tsunami presented their narrative experience of disaster response and recovery. Workshops discussed and identified core elements that participants considered vital to a social work curriculum that would enable social work graduates in a range of community and cultural settings to respond in safe, creative and informed ways. We present our core ideas for a social work disaster curriculum and consider a wide range of educational content based on existing knowledge bases and new content within a disaster framework.

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  • "But what about the theory?" Designing a social work curriculum around practice learning and reflection

    Adamson, Carole; Bellinger, A (2010-06-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curriculum design in an academic context operates within a site of tension characterised by the need

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  • Context and relationship: defining resilience in health social workers

    Adamson, Carole; Beddoe, Elizabeth; Huggard, Peter (2011-11-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A qualitative study of social workers in physical and mental health asked experienced social workers who self-defined as resilient to define the concept and to explore the elements of resiliency within their practice. Initial definition of resilience as a personal characteristic was developed into a strongly contextual and relational construct, the binding feature of which was self-awareness and the capacity to reflect. A strong feature of the social workers??? understanding of resilience was their focus on relationship with colleagues and the quality of professional social work practice with service users. Further reflexive and structural elements in their professional lives were identified, highlighting that resilience within health social workers is in dynamic relationship with the organisational context. A resilience framework derived from current literature and from the research is presented.

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  • How do we make a generic social work curriculum disaster???informed?

    Adamson, Carole (2017-05-29)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Globally, the social work qualifying curriculum is a dynamic construction of core subjects reflective of local contexts, responsive to the principles of the IFSW definition (IFSW, 2014). Whilst the urgency of disaster highlights the imperative for determining the nature of the social work role and response, the possibilities of a disaster-informed curriculum are often subsumed within a host of competing demands. How then can we plan for the unpredictable and ensure that a qualifying social work curriculum contains sufficient preparation for graduate capacity in disaster risk reduction (DRR)? Whilst a minority of qualifying programmes contain specific disaster modules, the challenge for much of social work education is to insert sufficient disaster knowledge through linkages to existing curriculum foci. Starting with an overview of skills and knowledge required for DRR, this practical presentation illustrates ways in which a generic social work curriculum can be infiltrated and embedded with disaster-informed knowledge.

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  • Practice-led curricula: driving from the front or rear seat?

    Adamson, Carole (2009-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Do knowledge-driven or practice-led models best serve the needs of social work practitioners engagin

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  • Building resilient practitioners

    Beddoe, Elizabeth; Adamson, Carole; Davys, AM (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    An intense focus on high-stakes, risk assessment imposes greater accountability on practitioners and public expectations of professionals are frequently unrealistic. Supervision can be a key tool in ensuring the well-being of frontline workers. Research does indicate that supervision can provide some protection against the corrosive effects of exposure to demanding, stressful work and the impact of working closely with service users who have traumatic stories and are distressed by emotional, psychological and physical experiences (Mor Barak et al, 2009). Increasingly governments, professional bodies and employers have recognised this potential harm to professionals working in health, social care and justice settings and have acknowledged the obligation to ensure workplaces and practices are safe and that workers have access to a range of mechanisms to prevent harm. Students have to learn to fully utilise supervision, and field educators need to teach them how to be supervised. This is a neglected area in professional development for practitioners who take students on placement having had no supervision training. Davys and Beddoe (2009; 2010) provide a structure for student supervision that can be utilized for three outcomes: to assist students to learn how to be supervised; to assist field educators to develop their supervision skills and lastly to promote and build practitioner resilience.

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  • Kate van Heugten (2014) Human Service Organizations in the Disaster Context. Palgrave MacMillan.

    Adamson, Carole (2015)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Resilience-informed supervision

    Adamson, Carole (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Professional supervision is increasingly recognised as being a core contributor to the sustainability of resilience and sound coping strategies for professionals within the human services. Resilient practitioners contribute to the overall health and wellbeing of both the organisations and the people with whom they work. This paper uses an applied lens that defines resiliency as both an individual and an environmental issue and extracts key principles of relevance to the professional supervision process and environment. In so doing, key questions concerning supervision's role, process and setting are raised for discussion.

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  • Ageing and mental health in diversity: A New Zealand experience

    Park, H-J; Adamson, Carole (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    As is the case in most developed nations, a significant proportion of New Zealand's older people experience mental health issues in their everyday lives. This chapter aims to provide an outline of 'mental health and older adults' in the New Zealand context. this background snapshot provides a foundation for the New Zealand landscape on this topic. Cultural iniatives and legislative acts are highlighted alongside current programmes in mental health for older people. Challenges around care for older people with mental health issues abound due to wide-ranging complexities surrounding their care and treatment; there is also limited subject-specific research being undetaken. Urgently needed are new approaches to economic planning, health care and welfare support, retirement policies, innovative living space arrangements and inter-generational relations alongside the promotion of contructive views on ageing.

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  • The art and science of publishing: From becoming a peer reviewer to being a guest editor

    Adamson, Carole; Beddoe, Elizabeth (2015-09-03)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Beginning career educators face the challenge of learning many new skills. That we will know certain arcane things is often taken for granted. One day an email will arrive asking you to anonymously review an article. You have been chosen because the editor has seen your recent article based on your masters or PhD research. What does it mean to conduct a peer review? What do you do about conflicts of interest? What if it doesn???t cite your own work and should? How much should you write? How can you distinguish minor from major revisions? What does reject and resubmit mean? And a little further on there may be opportunities to put together a team to guest edit an issue of a journal around your research interests. What might be involved in editorial processes? This workshop will provide guidance and encouragement to any participants wanting to know more about these dimensions of academic life. The presenters are frequent peer reviewers and have several different kinds of editorial experiences.

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  • Complexity and Context: Staff Support Systems in Mental Health after Critical Incidents and Traumatic Events

    Adamson, Carole (2006)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This thesis presents an ecological exploration of the experiences of mental health workers faced with critical incidents and traumatic events in the course of their work. A qualitative study, it takes the experiences of twenty workers from a range of disciplines and environments, and examines their preparation for exposure to extreme stress, their passage through the incidents that they chose to relate, and the organisational response to the events. The central research question explores the knowledge bases currently utilised within trauma and critical incident response, and the degree to which these provide adequate explanatory, practice and evaluation models for responses to workplace incidents. It is examined through the narratives of the mental health workers, who self-define and explore the nature of their preparation for, and experience of, critical incidents and traumatic events in their workplace. The question is contextualised through a review of the knowledge bases of trauma and extreme stress, and of the mental health environment in which the workers practice. A case study of the workplace support known as debriefing illustrates the tensions between current knowledge bases in the area. Informed by this, the key issues of what did or did not work for the participants are explored. The thesis argues that the paradigm shift signalled by the latest developments within conceptualisations of trauma is not yet complete, and that the ensuing tensions have created debate and confusion in the creation of adequate responses to workplace incidents. The findings of the research raise issues of complexity in the design and implementation of appropriate support systems, and lend a perspective to the critique of debriefing that has been missing from existing debates. Key principles for the development of safe and sound support systems, and their evaluation, are developed.

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  • Stress, trauma and critical incidents: the challenge for social work education

    Adamson, Carole (2006)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The article considers implications of research in regard to support systems for workers who have experienced traumatic events and critical incidents. The evidence is aligned with educators??? practice experience that students on placement, new graduates and experienced workers alike, all locate signi???cant stressors and challenges to their resiliency within the systemic and structural organisational contexts of the workplace. This emphasis upon job context as opposed to job content raises key challenges for social work educators. The article addresses issues that arise in the preparation for the management of stress and incidents and considers some tools and models that educators might employ in the pre-practice environment. The article is based upon a presentation given at the Social Work Education symposium in Auckland in January 2006.

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  • Companion animals and disasters: How best can social work organisations respond?

    Adamson, Carole (2017-05-30)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Disaster risk reduction (DRR) has a primary focus on the needs of people affected by disaster. People, however, often form attachment bonds with animals, who live alongside humans as companions and who form part of the consideration for household response in times of disaster. Social work practice and the DRR response, however, has tended to marginalise and underplay the importance of these attachment relationships. A review of current research literature suggests that a suitable lens for considering the needs of companion animals and their families in the disaster context is a relational one which emphasises the human-animal bond. This presentation suggests that disaster planning in social work practice and organisations must therefore emphasise not only the animal rights and welfare aspects of disasters but also the human behaviour within response and recovery processes. Taking an inclusive stance that considers animals as part of the human family, this presentation explores key messages from previous disaster settings and considers the implications for disaster preparation and response within social work practice. Organisational responsibilities and the opportunities for animal-inclusive social work education are addressed.

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