3 results for Ahuriri-Driscoll, A

  • Adoption and surrogacy - Maori perspectives

    Ahuriri-Driscoll, A (2016)

    Oral Presentations
    University of Canterbury Library

    I’m Annabel Ahuriri-Driscoll, I’m a lecturer in Maori health at the University of Canterbury. In relation to the adoption aspect of my presentation, I’m undertaking PhD study of the experiences of Maori adoptees. In relation to the focus on surrogacy, I’m part of a project that is examining surrogacy laws in New Zealand, and am exploring Maori perspectives within that. The intention of my presentation today is to not necessarily provide a definitive Maori perspective in relation to either topic, but to consider some important threads, and weave these together, loosely!

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  • The main divide - nature/culture dualisms and the Maori adoptee

    Ahuriri-Driscoll, A (2016)


    University of Canterbury Library

    The main divide – nature/culture dualisms and the Māori adoptee The dichotomy of the ‘nature-culture divide’ (Vaisman, 2013) punctuates the lived experiences of Māori adopted within New Zealand between 1955 and 1985, in several ways. The ‘closed stranger’ adoption process sought a ‘clean break’ between birth family and child, promoting the supremacy of environment and socialisation over biology, nurture over nature (Griffith, 1997). However, the engineering of new adoptive kinship relationships as if they were biological (Delany, 1997), simultaneously dissolved and mimicked ‘natural’ ties, placing adoptive families in the position of producing the very differences they were constructed to deny, and adoptees in a situation of “irresolvable contradictions” (Yngvesson & Mahoney, 2000, p. 83; Blake, 2013). According to several writers, identity provides the coherence sought by adoptees in the face of biological/social ‘rupture’ (Haenga Collins, 2011; Yngvesson & Mahoney, 2000). For Māori adoptees, reconnecting with birth whānau (family) and whakapapa (genealogy) holds the promise of identity fulfillment, legitimacy and perhaps even ‘authenticity’. This too can be fraught, as the fragmentation perpetuated by adoption is not easily reconciled with the emphasis on integrity and wholeness of whānau and continuity of whakapapa in the Māori world (Ministerial Advisory Committee, 1988; Bradley, 1997). Furthermore, adoptees may find that their claim to biological ties nonetheless falls short of the upbringing within Māori community that is integral to Māori identity and personhood (Kāretu, n.d., Durie, 1997, cited in Newman, 2011). Caught between a dualism of essentialism and constructionism (Woodward, 1997), the Māori adoptee identity ‘project’ is complex and has the potential to yield important insights relating to identity (West, 2012). This presentation will outline current PhD research that is exploring Māori adoptee identities as they are constructed ‘in between’ (Collins, 1999; Waters, 2004; Webber, 2008; Yngvesson & Mahoney, 2000), from experience (Alcoff, 2010) and as resources (Wieland, 2010).

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  • Women’s acceptability of screening for HIV in pregnancy

    Heckert, K.A.; Bagshaw, S.; Fursman, L.; Kipa, M.; Wilson, M.; Braiden, V.; Ahuriri-Driscoll, A (2001)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Aims. To elicit acceptability of HIV screening during pregnancy in women of reproductive age in Christchurch. Methods. In-depth face-to-face interviews were conducted with women of reproductive age recruited from seven different service sites in Christchurch. Results. Women wanted to know about treatment that significantly reduces the risk of mother-to-child transmission. They wanted to know about other antenatal screening and were prepared to provide general consent, rather than specific consent for HIV testing. All study participants favoured routine offer of HIV testing during pregnancy for all women and most would agree to be tested, if the test was offered and recommended. Conclusions. The results of this study indicate the need to develop and test a user-friendly approach for offering routine HIV testing during standard antenatal care in New Zealand.

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