24 results for Airini

  • Supervision as a Signature Pedagogy in Studio: Some preliminary findings from the Te Ara Kakena project

    Brown, Deidre; Bywater, J; Rakena, TO; Airini (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The student experience of studio learning at postgraduate levels determines not only the development of graduates with a specialised perspective and skill-set but also the direction of future tertiary research and teaching. Yet this experience has not been adequately captured in tertiary teaching research projects, which are often informed by research assumptions that perpetuate institutionally-ascribed definitions of academic success and have their analytical foundations in ‘lecture-based’ undergraduate teaching research. Postgraduate learning in studio,however, primarily takes place in small groups of less than fifty students where there is much more direct contact with teachers (and their teaching practices) and in physical contexts that do not resemble theatrical learning forums. The Te Ara Kakena:1 Quality Teaching in Postgraduate Studies research project centralises the postgraduate student experience of learning in studio contexts for the purposes of creating teaching interventions that will enhance ‘success,’ according to student definitions of that term.

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  • Success for all: Improving Maori and Pasifika student success in degree-level studies

    Airini; Brown, Deidre; Curtis, Elana; Johnson, Odie; Luatua, Fred; O'Shea, Mona; Rakena, Te Oti; Reynolds, Gillian; Sauni, Pale; Smith, Angie; Su'a Huirua, To'aiga; Tarawa, Matt; Townsend, Sonia; Savage, Tania; Ulugia-Pua, Meryl (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Final report for research project funded via TLRI

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  • Pasifika Education: Historical foundations for success

    Airini; Leaupepe, M; Sauni Seiuli Luama, SLM; Tuafuti, Patisepa; Amituanai-Toloa, Meaola (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Contributed 90% to chapter on historical foundations of Pasifika education.

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  • Supervision as Signature Pedagogy in Studio: Some Preliminary findings from the Te Ara Kakena Project.

    Brown, D; Bywater, J; Rakena, Te Oti; Airini (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction The student experience of studio learning at postgraduate levels determines not only the development of graduates with a specialised perspective and skill-set but also the direction of future tertiary research and teaching. Yet this experience has not been adequately captured in tertiary teaching research projects, which are often informed by research assumptions that perpetuate institutionally-ascribed definitions of academic success and have their analytical foundations in ‘lecture-based’ undergraduate teaching research.

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  • Pasifika education: Historical themes

    Airini; Leaupepe, M; Sauni, Seiuli; Tuafuti, P; Amituanai-Toloa, M (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Introduction

    Jesson, Jocelyn; Carpenter, Vicki; McLean, Margaret; Stephenson, MS; Airini (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    As a dynamic activity that has significant and far-reaching consequences, university teaching is constantly under review. Ideas about good teaching, its objectives, and the means of achieving those objectives are shifting and contested.

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  • TEU LE VA - Relationships across research and policy in Pasifika education A collective approach to knowledge generation & policy development for action towards Pasifika education success

    Airini; Anae, Melani; Mila-Schaaf, K (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    By drawing on community knowledge, research, and focus group data Teu le Va is about bringing researchers and policy makers together within a shared agenda and common processes to help improve education outcomes for and with Pasifika learners.

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  • Teu Le Va — Relationships across research and policy in Pasifika education: A collective approach to knowledge generation & policy development for action towards Pasifika education success

    Airini; Anae, Melani; Mila-Schaaf, K (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    In November 2007, a partnership between the Pasifika Caucus of the New Zealand Association for Research in Education (NZARE) and the Ministry of Education’s Pasifika and Research and Evaluation teams formed to sponsor the symposium Is Your Research Making a Difference to Pasifika Education? The symposium sought to grow the pool of researchers able and motivated to undertake quality research on improving Pasifika student outcomes; to identify good practice that has enhanced Pasifika education research/policy linkages; and to share ideas for and about Pasifika education research methodologies, in order to improve the quality and quantity of evidence informing Pasifika education policy. A wide group of people who have a stake in Pasifika education research came to the symposium to think about, debate and advise on the formation of guidelines to translate Pasifika education research into policy. The group included associates from the Ministry of Education and other government agencies, universities, the Private Training Establishment (PTE) sector, independent researchers, and community members.

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  • Success for all: Improving Maori and Pasifika student success in degree-level studies

    Airini; Brown, Deidre; Curtis, Elana; Johnston, Odie; Luatua, Fred; O'Shea, Mona; Rakena, Te Oti; Reynolds, Gillan; Sauni, Pale; Smith, Angie; Su'a Huirua, To'aiga; Tarawa, Matt; Townsend, Sonia; Savage, Tania; Ulugia-Pua, Meryl (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Success for All project sought to examine the ways in which nonlecture teaching helps or hinders Māori student and Pasifika student success in preparing for or completing degree-level studies. Good practice was to be identified. This report is the final in a series of detailed technical reports prepared by the Success for All research team through the leadership of Dr Airini.

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  • The road belongs to me: promising practices in distance education

    Airini; Toso, Meripa; Sauni, SL; Leaupepe, Manutai; Pua, V; Tuafuti, P (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    We often like to start with a story: This one is about the end and the journey to completing a university qualification.

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  • Pasifika Education: Historical themes

    Airini; Leaupepe, M; Sauni Seiuli Luama, SLM; Tuafuti, Patisepa; Amituanai-Toloa, Meaola (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • University Teaching Reconsidered: Justice, practice,inquiry

    Jesson, Jocelyn; Carpenter, VM; McLean, MA; Stephenson M S; Airini (2010)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Student-Centred Success in the Music Studio Environment: Improving Indigenous and Minority Student Success in Degree-level Studies,

    Rakena, Te Oti; Airini; Brown, Deidre; Tarawa, Matthew; O Shea, Mona (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    'Success for All' is a two-year evidence-based project that targets indigenous New Zealand (Maori) student success and minority (Pasifika) student success in New Zealand degree-level education. The team is interested in increasing rates of success by investigating the ways in which non-lecture teaching and learning helps or hinders student success in degree-level studies. This paper will focus on one faculty that includes the Schools of Music, Dance, Fine Arts, Architecture and Planning. The learning environment explored in this faculty is studio-based learning. The paper will contextualise the studio learning environment and describe the collection and analysis of student narratives. The paper will highlight data collected from the School of Music. Good practice will be identified and the integration of indigenous (Kaupapa Maori Research) and minority (Pasifika Research) methodologies and methods will be discussed.

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  • Teaching for Student Success: Promising Practices in University Teaching.

    Airini; Curtis, Elana; Townsend, S; Rakeha, T; Brown, D; Sanni, P; Smith, A; Luatua, F; Reynolds, G; Johnson, O (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The ability of universities to teach in ways that support the success of diverse students is a matter of focused action in many nations, especially those where demographic trends suggest an increasing prevalence of students from groups under-represented in universities. This paper describes findings from research involving three Faculties and a service centre at a university. Ninety-two interviews were undertaken with Māori and Pasifika students using the Critical Incident Technique (CIT). Teaching and other interventions in non-lecture settings based on the Phase 1 interview findings were implemented. A second set of interviews followed to evaluate the impact of the interventions. Results from the interviews are discussed, along with an analysis of more than 1900 student stories of when teaching in non-lecture settings has helped or hindered their success in degree-level studies. Promising practices for university teaching that helps Māori and Pasifika success are described.

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  • What educational reform means: lessons from teachers, research and policy working together for student success

    Airini; McNaughton, S; Langley, JP; Sauni, P (2007)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper describes education reform projects designed to bring about major improvements in school adn tertiary stduent outcomes. Individually the projects illustrate characteristics of education reform in local contexts for primary, secondary and tertiary education. In combination they signal key components essential to getting large scal high-quality school and tertiary education cultures geared to student success.

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  • “Be true to one’s self”: Learning to be leaders in Pasifika education strategy.

    Airini (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper is about strategic change in Pasifika education and growing the leaders to help make that happen. ‘Strategy implementation’ is of particular concern and refers to large-scale, future-oriented plans for optimising achievement of an organisation’s mission and objectives. Six categories (Network, Monitor and manage the implementation of the strategy, Nurture personal attributes, Develop the strategic plan, Advance professional attributes, Esteem the presence of Pasifika leaders) and 23 sub-categories are described of what helps in strategy implementation, as reported by leaders of Pasifika ethnicity,. The categories and sub-categories are presented as a description of the core competencies for leaders of strategy implementation for Pasifika advancement, and for strategy implementation in education. This paper highlights ways in which leadership education might be usefully informed and expanded by Pasifika perspectives on strategy implementation.

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  • Teaching for student success: Promising practices in university teaching.

    Airini; Curtis, E; Townsend, S; Rakena, T; Brown, D; Sauni, P; Smith, A; Luatua, F; Reynolds, G; Johnson, O (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The ability of universities to teach in ways that support the success of diverse students is a matter of focused action in many nations, especially those where demographic trends suggest an increasing prevalence of students from groups under-represented in universities. This paper describes findings from research involving three Faculties and a service centre at a university. Ninety-two interviews were undertaken with Māori and Pasifika students using the Critical Incident Technique (CIT). Teaching and other interventions in non-lecture settings based on the Phase 1 interview findings were implemented. A second set of interviews followed to evaluate the impact of the interventions. Results from the interviews are discussed, along with an analysis of more than 1900 student stories of when teaching in non-lecture settings has helped or hindered their success in degree-level studies. Promising practices for university teaching that helps Māori and Pasifika success are described.

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  • Learning to be leaders in higher education: What helps or hinders women's advancement as leaders in universities

    Airini; Collings, S.; Conner, L.; Midson, B.; McPherson, K.; Wilson, C. (2008)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper describes results from an online survey of 26 women from 8 universities, describing times when work and non-work situations have helped or hindered their advancement in university leadership roles. From the 110 reported incidents, 5 categories of factors that make a difference to advancement as leaders have been identified. This research is part of the L-SHIP (Leadership- Supporting Higher Intent & Practice) project and has two main aims. First, to identify factors in universities that help and hinder women’s advancement as leaders, as reported by women; second, to produce practical programmes for aspiring leaders and tertiary institutions on how to identify what helps and hinders advancement in university leadership roles, and how to develop effective programmes to harness strengths and address barriers. This research is a first step to the L-SHIP Toolkit for good practice in leadership development in higher education.

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  • Open to critique: predictive effects of academic outcomes from a bridging/foundation programme on first-year degree-level study

    Curtis, Elana; Wikaire, Erena; Jiang, Yannan; McMillan, Louise; Loto, Robert; Fonua, S; Herbert, R; Hori, M; Ko, T; Newport, R; Salter, D; Wiles, Janine; Airini; Reid, Mary-Jane (2015-09-23)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bridging/foundation programmes are often provided by tertiary institutions to increase equity in access and academic performance of students from under-served communities. Little empirical evidence exists to measure the effectiveness of these bridging/foundation programmes on undergraduate academic outcomes. This research identifies the predictive effect of academic outcomes achieved within a bridging/foundation programme, targeted towards indigenous and ethnic minority students, on first-year degree-level outcomes. Overall performance within the bridging/foundation programme was positively associated with increasing Grade Point Average (GPA), ???Core 4??? GPA and passing all courses in first year. However, mixed associations were identified between feeder bridging/foundation courses and their intended first year course counterparts. These findings support the continued provision of bridging/foundation education; however, curricular reform within the bridging/foundation programme was required. Key developments included: restructuring course delivery; increasing constructive alignment across the curriculum; increasing cultural content within western science-orientated courses; introduction of cross-curricular assessment and use of additional innovative teaching and learning activities. Additional challenges remain for degree programmes to explore how they can change in order to better support indigenous and ethnic minority student success within first-year tertiary study.

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  • Success for all: Eroding the culture of power in the one-to-one teaching and learning context

    Rakena, Te Oti; Airini; Brown, Deidre (2016-08)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study applied a cultural lens to the ???expert???novice dyad??? (Kennell, 2002, p. 243) and explored the learning experiences of indigenous minorities studying in this context. The purpose of this study was to gather narratives that reflected the nature of teaching practices in the one-to-one studio context. The resulting data presented more complex stories that described how indigenous and minority students participate in the conservatory learning culture. The narratives described strategies for overcoming educational and institutional obstacles, and outlined examples of social practices within their ???learning culture??? (Hodkinson, Biesta, & James, 2007, p. 419) that students had culturally modified in order to optimize their educational experience. The article examines the notions of critique, resistance, struggle and emancipation in a specific learning culture, a School of Music founded on the European conservatory model.

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