7 results for Alcock, Sophie

  • 'I caught your eye, I catched your teeth' : distributed playfulness connecting children.

    Alcock, Sophie (2009)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper explores how playful activity mediates and connects children as “mind” becomes distributed across individuals (Rogoff, 1998; Salomon, 1993; Tomasello et al. 2005). “Mind” includes consciousness, cognition, emotion and imagination. Children’s playful communication is mediated and distributed via words, sounds, gestures, gaze, posture, rhythm, and movement using a variety of strategies including imitation and repetition. Socio-cultural historical activity theory informs both the methodological paradigm of the research and the framework for data analysis (Chaiklin, 2001; Cole, 1996; Engeström, 1999; Vygotsky, 1986, 1978; Wertsch, 1998). Findings suggest that understanding children’s mediated and distributed relationships with others is central to understanding children in early childhood settings. Distributed understandings of mind have pedagogical implications for how teachers view children in early childhood centre communities, and for curriculum and assessment practices.

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  • Dressing up play: Rethinking play and playfulness from socio-cultural perspectives

    Alcock, Sophie (2009)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Play is complex, contradictory, and sometimes chaotic. It has been described in such contrary ways as: both work and fun, pleasurable, purposeful and also without purpose, intrinsically motivated, yet socially and biologically driven and without predetermined outcomes (Lemke, 1995). Children playing together are engaging their emotional, cognitive, physical, social, spiritual selves in ways which transcend boundaries between these traditional psychological domains. Feelings, thoughts, and bodies are connected, and may be perceived and represented aesthetically in children’s play where “aesthetic experience encourages consciousness to engage in a form of reflection that does not restrict it in any way. This highly unusual experience opens up for consciousness new and previously unrealized possibilities” (Bubner, 1997, p. 169).

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  • Young Children Being Rhythmically Playful: creating musike together

    Alcock, Sophie (2008)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This article explores young children’s rhythmic, musical, aesthetic and playful creative communication in an early childhood education centre. Young children’s communication is musically rhythmic and social. The data, presented as ‘events’, formed part of an ethnographic-inspired study conducted by the researcher as a participant observer. Cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) framed the methodology, with mediated activity as the unit of analysis. Critical and related aesthetic theory inform the data analyses, providing open ways of appreciating diversity in young children’s aesthetic experience. The collaborative nature of young children’s rhythmic musicality is explored and the article suggests that rhythm pervades young children’s creative and communicative playfulness.

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  • Reconceptualising child observation: Prioritising subjectivity

    Alcock, Sophie (2012)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This article puts forward a rationale for early childhood teachers observing and interpreting 'objectivity', 'subjectivity' and 'intersubjectivally'. By 'subjectively' I am referring to the idea of teachers working with interpreting the feelings and thoughts that subjectively emerge in them while they observe child(ren) ...

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  • Searching for play in Early Childhood Care and Education policy

    Alcock, Sophie (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Children (and adults) across all cultures play in culturally reflective ways (Goncu & Gaskins, 2007; Rogoff, 2003). Play is one of the most interesting characteristics of groups of children. Despite play being a preoccupation of most young children, and a desirable disposition for creative adults (Csikszentmihalyi, 1996; Sawyer, R.K., 2003) New Zealand Ministry of Education (MoE) Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) policy and curriculum documents make little or no mention of play (1996, 2004–2009, 2011, 2012). This paper explores the invisibility of play in official Ministry of Education (MoE) ECEC curriculum, assessment and policy documents and discusses possible reasons for this invisibility.

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  • Toddlers' complex communication: playfulness from a secure base

    Alcock, Sophie (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Attachment theory is presented in this article as involving embodied relational prcoesses within complex relational systems. Two narrative-like 'events' are re-presented to illustrate very young children playfully relating -- connecting and communicating inter- and intrasubjectively. The ethnographic inspired research methods included the researcher as participant observer, an outsider, an other, and a-part yet connected to the observation. Belonging and well-being, holding-on and letting-go, trust and the distributed nature of individual minds connected admidst playfulness, are images observed and interpreted in these (and other) events. Several of Winnicott's metaphorical concepts around transitional phenomena, transitional and potential space, holding and the environment as a good enough mother, are employed to further extend interpretations and understanding of attachment in complex relational ways. The implications lie in understanding and applying concepts associated with attachment theory in complex ways, rather than simply viewing attachment in terms of simplistic concepts and categories.

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  • Pedagogical Documentation: Beyond Observations

    Alcock, Sophie (2000)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper explores some of the issues for teachers in New Zealand / Aotearoa using pedagogical documentation. My interest in pedagogical documentation developed after visiting Sweden and Denmark as the 1996 recipient of the Margaret M. Blackwell Travel Study Fellowship. To my surprise "Reggio Emilia inspired" documentation was a prominent focus of discussion among many practitioners and some administrators and academics. The surprise was because Reggio Emilia is in Italy and I was in Scandinavia: a different cultural climate. My interest in pedagogical documentation has also stemmed from my observations, as a professional development facilitator, of stressed-out teachers collating extensive collections of unreflective written child observations for unclear reasons. The third stimulus for this paper developed from the first two, and was a small case study research project which involved myself, as a researcher and a professional development facilitator, working with four teachers in a childcare centre, over a six-month period. The professional development focus was on the teachers' use of pedagogical documentation while the research programme explored the teachers' understandings. This paper is, however, broader than the research project. It is divided into five sections. The first three sections review the literature, and the historical and current policy contexts of documentation. Sections 4 and 5 describe the research project and present some insights gained about teachers' use of documentation. The five sections are: 1. What is pedagogical documentation ? 2. Setting the scene: policy, history and culture 3. Interpretations and implications of the policy context 4. An action research project: Reflecting on some traditions and tools of pedagogical documentation 5. Considerations and challenges for teachers using documentation.

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