2 results for Allan, S.

  • Truth in a War Zone: The Role of Warblogs in Iraq

    Matheson, D.; Allan, S. (2007)

    Chapters
    University of Canterbury Library

    This chapter proposes to examine the emergent forms and practices of blogging as an augmentation of – and at times challenge to – war reporting. As will soon become apparent, however, we have not attempted the difficult task of comprehensively surveying the multiplicity of warblogs concerned with the invasion and its aftermath. Rather, we have chosen to investigate a small number, grouping them into three broad categories: warblogs associated with major news organizations; warblogs produced by freelance or ‘sojo’ reporters, as well as ‘personal’ or ‘amateur’ journalists; and warblogs posted by Iraqi citizens. In the course of our analysis, we draw upon insights provided by bloggers themselves, both from interviews conducted by ourselves as well as from other sources. We suggest that these writers valued the use of blogging as journalism – characterized as it is by informality, subjectivity and eyewitness experience – for the ways in which it cuts across the fundamentals of ostensibly impartial news reporting. In this chapter’s evaluation of warblogging’s relative strengths and limitations, then, care will be taken to discern the extent to which it represents a challenge to certain longstanding tenets of war reporting.

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  • Online Journalism in the Information Age

    Allan, S.; Matheson, D. (2004)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    The use of information by the powerful and privileged as a means to reinforce, even exacerbate, the structures of the ‘digital divide’ is well documented. In our view, however, insufficient attention has been devoted to examining the evolving forms, practices and epistemologies of online journalism in this context, especially with regard to its potential for shaping democratic deliberation and debate across what are ever more globalised public spheres. At stake for this article’s discussion, then, is the need to help establish the basis for a critical mode of enquiry into the ways in which journalism’s status in an online environment is being transformed by the informational dynamics of the network society.

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