3 results for Allayee, H

  • Guide and Position of the International Society of Nutrigenetics/Nutrigenomics on Personalized Nutrition: Part 2 - Ethics, Challenges and Endeavors of Precision Nutrition

    Kohlmeier, M; De Caterina, R; Ferguson, Lynnette; G??rman, U; Allayee, H; Prasad, C; Kang, JX; Nicoletti, CF; Martinez, JA (2016-01)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Nutrigenetics considers the influence of individual genetic variation on differences in response to dietary components, nutrient requirements and predisposition to disease. Nutrigenomics involves the study of interactions between the genome and diet, including how nutrients affect the transcription and translation process plus subsequent proteomic and metabolomic changes, and also differences in response to dietary factors based on the individual genetic makeup. Personalized characteristics such as age, gender, physical activity, physiological state and social status, and special conditions such as pregnancy and risk of disease can inform dietary advice that more closely meets individual needs. Precision nutrition has a promising future in treating the individual according to their phenotype and genetic characteristics, aimed at both the treatment and prevention of disease. However, many aspects are still in progress and remain as challenges for the future of nutrition. The integration of the human genotype and microbiome needs to be better understood. Further advances in data interpretation tools are also necessary, so that information obtained through newer tests and technologies can be properly transferred to consumers. Indeed, precision nutrition will integrate genetic data with phenotypical, social, cultural and personal preferences and lifestyles matters to provide a more individual nutrition, but considering public health perspectives, where ethical, legal and policy aspects need to be defined and implemented.

    View record details
  • New gene functions in megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation

    Gieger, C; Radhakrishnan, A; Cvejic, A; Tang, W; Porcu, E; Pistis, G; Serbanovic-Canic, J; Elling, U; Goodall, AH; Labrune, Y; Lopez, LM; M??gi, R; Meacham, S; Okada, Y; Pirastu, N; Sorice, R; Teumer, A; Voss, K; Zhang, W; Ramirez-Solis, R; Bis, JC; Ellinghaus, D; G??gele, M; Hottenga, J-J; Langenberg, C; Kovacs, P; O'reilly, PF; Shin, S-Y; Esko, T; Hartiala, J; Kanoni, S; Murgia, F; Parsa, A; Stephens, J; Van Der Harst, P; Ellen Van Der Schoot, C; Allayee, H; Attwood, A; Balkau, B; Bastardot, F; Basu, S; Baumeister, SE; Biino, G; Bomba, L; Bonnefond, A; Cambien, F; Chambers, JC; Cucca, F; D'Adamo, P; Davies, G; De Boer, RA; De Geus, EJC; D??ring, A; Elliott, P; Erdmann, J; Evans, DM; Falchi, M; Feng, W; Folsom, AR; Frazer, IH; Gibson, QD; Glazer, NL; Hammond, C; Hartikainen, A-L; Heckbert, SR; Hengstenberg, C; Hersch, M; Illig, T; Loos, RJF; Jolley, J; Tee Khaw, K; K??hnel, B; Kyrtsonis, M-C; Lagou, V; Lloyd-Jones, H; Lumley, Thomas; Mangino, M; Maschio, A; Mateo Leach, I; Mcknight, B; Memari, Y; Mitchell, BD; Montgomery, GW; Nakamura, Y; Nauck, M; Navis, G; N??thlings, U; Nolte, IM; Porteous, DJ; Pouta, A; Pramstaller, PP; Pullat, J; Ring, SM; Rotter, JI; Ruggiero, D; Ruokonen, A; Sala, C; Samani, NJ; Sambrook, J; Schlessinger, D; Schreiber, S; Schunkert, H; Scott, J; Smith, NL; Snieder, H; Starr, JM; Stumvoll, M; Takahashi, A; Wilson Tang, WH; Taylor, K; Tenesa, A; Lay Thein, S; T??njes, A; Uda, M; Ulivi, S; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Visscher, PM; V??lker, U; Wichmann, H-E; Wiggins, KL; Willemsen, G; Yang, T-P; Hua Zhao, J; Zitting, P; Bradley, JR; Dedoussis, GV; Gasparini, P; Hazen, SL; Metspalu, A; Pirastu, M; Shuldiner, AR; Joost Van Pelt, L; Zwaginga, J-J; Boomsma, DI; Deary, IJ; Franke, A; Froguel, P; Ganesh, SK; Jarvelin, M-R; Martin, NG; Meisinger, C; Psaty, BM; Spector, TD; Wareham, NJ; Akkerman, J-WN; Ciullo, M; Deloukas, P; Greinacher, A; Jupe, S; Kamatani, N; Khadake, J; Kooner, JS; Penninger, J; Prokopenko, I; Stemple, D; Toniolo, D; Wernisch, L; Sanna, S; Hicks, AA; Rendon, A; Ferreira, MA; Ouwehand, WH; Soranzo, N (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Platelets are the second most abundant cell type in blood and are essential for maintaining haemostasis. Their count and volume are tightly controlled within narrow physiological ranges, but there is only limited understanding of the molecular processes controlling both traits. Here we carried out a high-powered meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in up to 66,867 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. We identified 68 genomic loci reliably associated with platelet count and volume mapping to established and putative novel regulators of megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation. These genes show megakaryocyte-specific gene expression patterns and extensive network connectivity. Using gene silencing in Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster, we identified 11 of the genes as novel regulators of blood cell formation. Taken together, our findings advance understanding of novel gene functions controlling fate-determining events during megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation, providing a new example of successful translation of GWAS to function.

    View record details
  • Guide and Position of the International Society of Nutrigenetics/Nutrigenomics on Personalised Nutrition: Part 1 - Fields of Precision Nutrition

    Ferguson, Lynnette; De Caterina, R; G??rman, U; Allayee, H; Kohlmeier, M; Prasad, C; Choi, MS; Curi, R; de Luis, DA; Gil, ??; Kang, JX; Martin, RL; Milagro, FI; Nicoletti, CF; Nonino, CB; Ordovas, JM; Parslow, VR; Portillo, MP; Santos, JL; Serhan, CN; Simopoulos, AP; Vel??zquez-Arellano, A; Zulet, MA; Martinez, JA (2016-01)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Diversity in the genetic profile between individuals and specific ethnic groups affects nutrient requirements, metabolism and response to nutritional and dietary interventions. Indeed, individuals respond differently to lifestyle interventions (diet, physical activity, smoking, etc.). The sequencing of the human genome and subsequent increased knowledge regarding human genetic variation is contributing to the emergence of personalized nutrition. These advances in genetic science are raising numerous questions regarding the mode that precision nutrition can contribute solutions to emerging problems in public health, by reducing the risk and prevalence of nutrition-related diseases. Current views on personalized nutrition encompass omics technologies (nutrigenomics, transcriptomics, epigenomics, foodomics, metabolomics, metagenomics, etc.), functional food development and challenges related to legal and ethical aspects, application in clinical practice, and population scope, in terms of guidelines and epidemiological factors. In this context, precision nutrition can be considered as occurring at three levels: (1) conventional nutrition based on general guidelines for population groups by age, gender and social determinants; (2) individualized nutrition that adds phenotypic information about the person's current nutritional status (e.g. anthropometry, biochemical and metabolic analysis, physical activity, among others), and (3) genotype-directed nutrition based on rare or common gene variation. Research and appropriate translation into medical practice and dietary recommendations must be based on a solid foundation of knowledge derived from studies on nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics. A scientific society, such as the International Society of Nutrigenetics/Nutrigenomics (ISNN), internationally devoted to the study of nutrigenetics/nutrigenomics, can indeed serve the commendable roles of (1) promoting science and favoring scientific communication and (2) permanently working as a 'clearing house' to prevent disqualifying logical jumps, correct or stop unwarranted claims, and prevent the creation of unwarranted expectations in patients and in the general public. In this statement, we are focusing on the scientific aspects of disciplines covering nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics issues. Genetic screening and the ethical, legal, social and economic aspects will be dealt with in subsequent statements of the Society.

    View record details