3 results for Allen, GR

  • The PLATO Dome A Site-Testing Observatory: Instrumentation and First Results

    Yang, H; Allen, GR; Ashley, MC; Bonner, CS; Bradley, Stuart; Cui, X; Everett, JR; Feng, L; Gong, X; Hengst, S; Hu, J; Jiang, Z; Kulesa, CA; Lawrence, JS; Li, Y; Luong-Van, D; McCaughrean, MJ; Moore, AM; Pennypacker, C; Qin, W; Riddle, R; Shang, Z; Storey, JW; Sun, B; Suntzeff, N; Tothill, NF; Travouillon, T; Walker, CK; Wang, L; Yan, J; Yang, J; York, D; Yuan, X; Zhang, XG; Zhang, Z; Zhou, X; Zhou, Z (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The PLATeau Observatory (PLATO) is an automated self-powered astrophysical observatory that was deployed to Dome A, the highest point on the Antarctic plateau, in 2008 January. PLATO consists of a suite of site-testing instruments designed to quantify the benefits of the Dome A site for astronomy, and science instruments designed to take advantage of the unique observing conditions. Instruments include CSTAR, an array of optical telescopes for transient astronomy; Gattini, an instrument to measure the optical sky brightness and cloud cover statistics; DASLE, an experiment to measure the statistics of the meteorological conditions within the near-surface layer; Pre-HEAT, a submillimeter tipping radiometer measuring the atmospheric transmission and water vapor content and performing spectral line imaging of the Galactic plane; and Snodar, an acoustic radar designed to measure turbulence within the near-surface layer. PLATO has run completely unattended and collected data throughout the winter 2008 season. Here we present a detailed description of the PLATO instrument suite and preliminary results obtained from the first season of operation.

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  • Characterization of dicarboxylic salts of protonated triethylenetetramine useful for the treatment of copper-related Pathologies

    Soehnel, Kathrin; Boyd, Peter; Sohnel, T; Allen, GR; Phillips, Anthony; Cooper, Garth (2007-09)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    X-ray crystal structures of three salts of protonated triethylenetetramine, (H(4)TETA)(4+), with succinate, maleate, and fumarate anions are reported. Structures of the complexes (H-4-triethylenetetramine)(hydrogenmaleate)(4)center dot 2H(2)O [(H(4)TETA)(Hmal)(4)center dot 2H(2)O] (1), (H4-triethylenetetramine)(hydrogenfumarate)(4)center dot 3.3H(2)O [(H(4)TETA)(HfuM)(4)center dot 3.3H(2)O] (2), and (H-4-triethylenetetramine)(succinate)(2) [(H(4)TETA)(suc)(2)] (3) all form assemblies of alternating two-dimensional layers of (H(4)TETA)(4+) and the anionic species via hydrogen-bond networks. Both classical and nonclassical hydrogen bonds between the protonated amine groups, anions, and water molecules were observed. X-ray powder diffraction measurements, differential thermal analysis/thermogravimetry, density vapor sorption, and Karl Fischer titration measurements were performed to obtain confirmatory information about the water content in the structures 1 and 2 and to examine polymorphism within the salts. The nonhydrated salt 3 was determined to be the most favorable salt formulation for use in medicinal applications.

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  • Regeneration of the heart in diabetes by selective copper chelation

    Cooper, GJS; Phillips, Anthony; Choong, SY; Leonard, BL; Crossman, DJ; Brunton, DH; Saafi, EL; Dissanayake, AM; Cowan, Brett; Young, AA; Occleshaw, CJ; Chan, YK; Leahy, FE; Keogh, GF; Gamble, GD; Allen, GR; Pope, AJ; Boyd, PDW; Poppitt, SD; Borg, TK; Doughty, Robert; Baker, JR (2004-09)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Heart disease is the major cause of death in diabetes, a disorder characterized by chronic hyperglycemia and cardiovascular complications. Although altered systemic regulation of transition metals in diabetes has been the subject of previous investigation, it is not known whether changed transition metal metabolism results in heart disease in common forms of diabetes and whether metal chelation can reverse the condition. We found that administration of the Cu-selective transition metal chelator trientine to rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes caused increased urinary Cu excretion compared with matched controls. A Cu-II-trientine complex was demonstrated in the urine of treated rats. In diabetic animals with established heart failure, we show here for the first time that 7 weeks of oral trientine therapy significantly alleviated heart failure without lowering blood glucose, substantially improved cardiomyocyte structure, and reversed elevations in left ventricular collagen and beta(1) integrin. Oral trientine treatment also caused elevated Cu excretion in humans with type 2 diabetes, in whom 6 months of treatment caused elevated left ventricular mass to decline significantly toward normal. These data implicate accumulation of elevated loosely bound Cu in the mechanism of cardiac damage in diabetes and support the use of selective Cu chelation in the treatment of this condition.

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