6 results for Allen, Tammy D.

  • Flexible work arrangements availability and their relationship with work-to-family conflict, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions: A comparison of three country clusters

    Masuda, Aline D.; Poelmans, Steven A.Y.; Allen, Tammy D.; Spector, Paul E.; Lapierre, Laurent M.; Cooper, Cary L.; Abarca, Nureya; Brough, Paula; Ferreiro, Pablo; Fraile, Guillermo; Lu, Luo; Lu, Chang-Qin; Siu, Oi Ling; O’Driscoll, Michael P.; Simoni, Alejandra Suarez; Shima, Satoru; Moreno-Velazquez, Ivonne (2011)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The present study explored the availability of flexible work arrangements (FWA) and their relationship with manager outcomes of job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and work-to-family conflict (WFC) across country clusters. We used individualism and collectivism to explain differences in FWA availability across Latin American, Anglo, and Asian clusters. Managers from the Anglo cluster were more likely to report working in organisations that offer FWA compared to managers from other clusters. For Anglo managers, flextime was the only FWA that had significant favorable relationships with the outcome variables. For Latin Americans, part-time work negatively related with turnover intentions and strain-based WFC. For Asians, flextime was unrelated to time-based WFC, and telecommuting was positively associated with strain-based WFC. The clusters did not moderate the compressed work week and outcome relationships. Implications for practitioners adopting FWA practices across cultures are discussed.

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  • Cross-national differences in relationships of work demands, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions with work-family conflict

    Spector, Paul E.; Allen, Tammy D.; Poelmans, Steven A.Y.; Lapierre, Laurent M.; Cooper, Cary L.; O’Driscoll, Michael P.; Sanchez, Juan I.; Abarca, Nureya; Alexandrova, Matilda; Beham, Barbara; Brough, Paula; Ferreiro, Pablo; Fraile, Guillermo; Lu, Chang-Qin; Lu, Luo; Moreno-Velazquez, Ivonne; Pagon, Milan; Pitariu, Horia; Salamatov, Volodymyr; Shima, Satoru; Simoni, Alejandra Suarez; Siu, Oi Ling; Widerszal-Bazyl, Maria (2007)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    A study of work interference with family (WIF) among managers is described, contrasting four clusters of countries, one of which is individualistic (Anglo) and three of which are collectivistic (Asia, East Europe, and Latin America). Country cluster (Anglo vs. each of the others) moderated the relation of work demands with strain-based WIF, with the Anglo country cluster having the strongest relationships. Country cluster moderated some of the relationships of strain-based WIF with both job satisfaction and turnover intentions, with Anglos showing the strongest relationships. Cluster differences in domestic help were ruled out as the possible explanation for these moderator results.

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  • Cross-cultural differences on work-to-family conflict and role satisfaction: A Taiwanese-British comparison

    Lu, Luo; Cooper, Cary L.; Kao, Shu-Fang; Change, Ting-Ting; Allen, Tammy D.; Lapierre, Laurent M.; O’Driscoll, Michael P.; Poelmans, Steven A.Y.; Sanchez, Juan I.; Spector, Paul E. (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The aim of this research was to explore relations between work and family demands and resources, work-to-family conflict (WFC), and work and family outcomes in a cross-cultural comparative context involving Taiwanese and British employees. Two-hundred and sixty-four Taiwanese employees and 137 British employees were surveyed using structured questionnaires. For both Taiwanese and British employees, work and family demands were positively related to WFC, whereas work resources were negatively related to WFC. Furthermore, WFC was negatively related to family satisfaction. More importantly, we found that nation moderated relationships between work resources and WFC, WFC and work, and family satisfaction. Specifically, work resources had a stronger protective effect for Taiwanese than British in reducing WFC, whereas WFC had a stronger detrimental effect on role satisfaction for British than Taiwanese. It is recommended that both culture-general and culture-specific effects should be taken into consideration in designing future WFC research and familyfriendly managerial practices.

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  • The link between national paid leave policy and work–family conflict among married working parents

    Allen, Tammy D.; Lapierre, Laurent M.; Spector, Paul E.; Poelmans, Steven A.Y.; O’Driscoll, Michael P.; Sanchez, Juan I.; Cooper, Cary L.; Walvoord, Ashley Gray; Antoniou, Alexandros-Stamatios; Brough, Paula; Geurts, Sabine; Kinnunen, Ulla; Pagon, Milan; Shima, Satoru; Woo, Jong-Min (2014-01)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    We investigated relationships between four dimensions of work–family conflict (time- and strain-based work interference with family, time- and strain-based family interference with work) and three key national paid leave policies (paid parental leave, paid sick leave, paid annual leave) among a sample of 643 working married parents with children under the age of 5 across 12 industrialised nations. Results provided some evidence that paid sick leave has a small but significant negative relationship with work–family conflict. Little evidence was revealed of a link between paid parental leave or of a link between paid annual leave and work–family conflict. Family-supportive organisational perceptions and family-supportive supervision were tested as moderators with some evidence to suggest that paid leave policies are most beneficial when employees' perceptions of support are higher than when they are lower. Family-supportive organisational perceptions and family-supportive supervision were both associated with less work–family conflict, providing evidence of their potential benefit across national contexts.

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  • A Cross-national Comparative Study of Work-family Stressors, Working Hours and Well-being: China and Latin America versus the Anglo World

    Spector, Paul E.; Cooper, Cary L.; Poelmans, Steven A.Y.; Allen, Tammy D.; O’Driscoll, Michael P.; Sanchez, Juan I.; Siu, Oi Ling; Dewe, Phil; Hart, Peter; Lu, Luo; Renault de Moraes, Lucio Flavio; Ostrognay, Gabrielle M.; Sparks, Kate; Wong, Paul; Yu, Shanfa (2004)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    A comparative study of work-family stressors, work hours and well-being was described contrasting 3 culturally distinct regions: Anglo (Australia, Canada, England, New Zealand, and U.S.), China (Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China, and Taiwan) and Latin America(Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, and Uruguay). Samples of managers were surveyed in each country, and country data were combined for the 3 regions. Support was found for the hypothesis that Anglos would demonstrate a stronger positive relation between work hours and work-family stressors than Chinese and Latins. In all 3 samples, work-family stressors related to increased job satisfaction and reduced well-being. Latins were found to work the most hours, have the most children, and report the highest job satisfaction. China was the only region in which being married and having more children related positively to all measures of well-being.

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  • Family-supportive organization perceptions, multiple dimensions of work–family conflict, and employee satisfaction: A test of model across five samples

    Lapierre, Laurent M.; Spector, Paul E.; Allen, Tammy D.; Poelmans, Steven; Cooper, Cary L.; O’Driscoll, Michael P.; Sanchez, Juan I.; Brough, Paula; Kinnunen, Ulla (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Using samples of managers drawn from five Western countries, we tested a theoretical model linking employees’ perceptions of their work environment’s family-supportiveness to six different dimensions of work–family conflict (WFC), and to their job satisfaction, family satisfaction, and life satisfaction. Our results are consistent with a causal process whereby employees working in an environment viewed as more family-supportive experience lower levels of WFC. Reduced WFC then translates into greater job and family satisfaction, followed by greater overall life satisfaction. These findings were generalizable across the five samples.

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