2 results for Ameratunga, R

  • Adverse reactions to food in New Zealand children aged 0-5 years

    Crooks, C; Ameratunga, R; Brewerton, M; Torok, M; Buetow, S; Brothers, S; Wall, Clare; Jorgensen, P (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aim The aim of this study was to describe parent/caregiver-reported adverse reactions to food in children aged 0???5 years in New Zealand. Method A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in clinics conducted by the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society, which is the major healthcare provider for New Zealand???s Well Child programme. Parents/caregivers of 110 (65%) children participated. Results Of the 44 children who experienced an adverse reaction to food, only four were clinically evaluated and had undergone diagnostic testing. Two other children were hospitalised following systemic symptoms. Neither was tested for food allergy. 18 (16%) children had physician diagnosed eczema. Conclusion Within the limitations of this small study, the data indicated adverse reactions to foods are a public health concern in New Zealand and may be under investigated even in children with severe symptoms. These children remain at increased risk of continued morbidity. Based on this preliminary study further research on food allergy in New Zealand is warranted.

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  • Hereditary Angioedema as a Metabolic Liver Disorder: Novel Therapeutic Options and Prospects for Cure

    Ameratunga, R; Bartlett, Adam; McCall, J; Steele, R; Woon, S-T; Katelaris, CH (2016-11-30)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations of the SERPING1 or the Factor 12 genes. It is potentially fatal, particularly if not identified at an early stage. Apart from androgens, which are contraindicated in children and in pregnant women, a range of effective, albeit very expensive treatments have recently become available for HAE patients. The cost of these new treatments is beyond the reach of most developing countries. At this time, there is no cure for the disorder. In spite of mutations of the SERPING1 gene, autoimmunity and infections are not prominent features of the condition. Here, we present the argument that HAE should be viewed primarily as a metabolic liver disorder. This conceptual paradigm shift will stimulate basic research and may facilitate new therapeutic approaches to HAE outlined in this paper. We suggest several novel potential treatment options for HAE from the perspectives of clinical immunology, molecular biology, and liver transplantation. Many of these offer the prospect of curing the disorder. The effectiveness of these options is rapidly improving in many cases, and their risks are decreasing. Given the very high costs of treating HAE, some of these curative options may become feasible in the next decade.

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