87 results for Ameratunga, Shanthi

  • Hand-held internet tablets for school-based data collection

    Denny, Simon; Milfont, Taciano; Utter, Jennifer; Robinson, Elizabeth; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Merry, Sally; Fleming, Theresa; Watson, Peter (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. BACKGROUND:In the last 20 years, researchers have been using computer self-administered questionnaires to gather data on a wide range of adolescent health related behaviours. More recently, researchers collecting data in schools have started to use smaller hand-held computers for their ease of use and portability. The aim of this study is to describe a new technology with wi-fi enabled hand-held internet tablets and to compare adolescent preferences of laptop computers or hand-held internet tablets in administering a youth health and well-being questionnaire in a school setting.METHODS:A total of 177 students took part in a pilot study of a national youth health and wellbeing survey. Students were randomly assigned to internet tablets or laptops at the start of the survey and were changed to the alternate mode of administration about half-way through the questionnaire. Students at the end of the questionnaire were asked which of the two modes of administration (1) they preferred, (2) was easier to use, (3) was more private and confidential, and (4) was easier to answer truthfully.RESULTS:Many students expressed no preference between laptop computers or internet tablets. However, among the students who expressed a preference between laptop computers or internet tablets, the majority of students found the internet tablets more private and confidential (p < 0.001) and easier to answer questions truthfully (p < 0.001) compared to laptop computers.CONCLUSION:This study demonstrates that using wi-fi enabled hand-held internet tablets is a feasible methodology for school-based surveys especially when asking about sensitive information.

    View record details
  • Social and physical contexts of schools and neighborhoods: Associations with physical activity among young people in New Zealand

    Utter, J; Denny, Simon; Robinson, E; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Milfont, TL (2011-09)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Objectives. We sought to determine the association between school- and neighborhood-level characteristics and physical activity among young people.Methods. We collected the data as part of Youth'07, a nationally representative survey of the health and well-being of high school students in New Zealand. In total, 9107 students from 96 schools participated (63% response rate). Students answered questions about their schools (e.g., support for physical activity) and neighborhoods (e.g., community cohesion, disintegration, safety, and recreational facilities). We created school-level measures by aggregating the students' reports within their schools and we created neighborhood-level measures by aggregating the students' reports of their neighborhoods to the census area unit of their residential address. We conducted analyses by using cross-classified random-effects models controlling for individual variables, with school and neighborhoods treated as random effects.Results. Schools characterized by high sports team participation and neighborhoods characterized by high social connections were positively associated with student physical activity. We observed few other significant characteristics of school and neighborhood environments.Conclusions. Our findings highlight that opportunity for sports participation and strong social connections in neighborhoods are particularly important for youths' physical activity. (Am J Public Health. 2011;101:1690-1695. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2011.300171)

    View record details
  • Being in Trouble with the Police and Associations with Mental Health Outcomes Amongst Alternative Education Students in New Zealand

    Clark, Terryann; Robinson, Elizabeth; Fleming, Theresa; Smith, J; Denny, S; Jackson, C; Raphael, Deborah; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Students who are excluded from mainstream education are vulnerable to negative health, social and educational outcomes. The purpose of this analysis to is to explore whether being in trouble with the Police is associated with mental health problems such as depressive symptoms, conduct problems, hyperactivity-inattention symptoms, marijuana use and binge drinking for students attending Alternative Education (AE) in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The role of conspicuity in bicycle crashes involving a motor vehicle

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-10-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Why is the risk of bicycle crash injury higher in the Auckland region?: Findings from the Taupo Bicycle Study.

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-10-06)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • What influences the association between previous and future crashes among cyclists.

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-10-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Riding in a motor vehicle with a driver under the influence of alcohol and drinking patterns: findings from a national survey of New Zealand youth

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Watson, Peter (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Objective. To investigate the relationships between the risks of riding in a motor vehicle with a driver under the influence of alcohol and young people's drinking patterns and usual drinking locations. Methods. A secondary analysis was undertaken of Youth2000 data - the first nationally representative youth health survey conducted in 2001. The study base comprised all secondary schools with more than 50 students enrolled in years 9 to 13 (ages 12 to 18 years). An anonymous multi-media computer-assisted interview survey collected information on drinking patterns, locations, and if the respondent had ridden in a motor vehicle with a driver who was under the influence of alcohol during the previous 30 days. Results. Of the 9,567 respondents, 27.8% reported riding with a driver who had been drinking alcohol and 27.4% reported riding with a driver who had consumed more than two glasses of alcohol in the two hours before travel (36.4% responded 'yes' to one or other item). After adjusting for age and gender, binge drinking, drinking in cars, at parties and outdoors, and drinking in the company of friends were associated with a significantly increased risk of riding in a motor vehicle driven by a driver under the influence of alcohol. This risk was not apparent among adolescents who usually consumed alcohol at home and those who usually drank with family. Conclusions. The findings indicate the need to consider how and where adolescents drink to inform effective public policies that can reduce alcohol-related harm and road traffic injury.

    View record details
  • Bicycle travel, injury risk and conspicuity: Findings from a PhD project in New Zealand

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2015-08)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Regular cycling provides health, environmental and economic benefits but is rarely part of everyday travel for many people. The real and perceived risk of injury is commonly cited as a significant deterrent to engaging in such activity and motor vehicles are regarded as a particular threat. Bicycle-motor vehicle collisions often result from the driver's failure to detect the cyclist in time, suggesting that conspicuity may be a contributing factor. This paper provides an overview of bicycle travel, injury risk and conspicuity in New Zealand, based on the findings of a PhD research project conducted in 2008-14. The findings of the Taupo Bicycle Study, a prospective cohort study involving 2,590 adult cyclists, were used in conjunction with aggregate or de-identified data from routinely collected national databases.

    View record details
  • Kicked out of School and Suffering: The Health Needs of Alternative Education Youth in New Zealand

    Fleming, Theresa; Clark, Terryann; Smith, J; Raphael, Deborah; Jackson, C; Denny, Simon; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Crengle, Suzanne (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Anonymous self-report health and wellbeing surveys were completed by alternative education (AE) students in the Auckland and Northland regions of New Zealand, and 11 semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants about their perceptions of health issues for AE students. Both groups reported concerning health-risk behaviours among AE students, including drug and alcohol abuse, depressive symptoms and dangerous driving. Health services have consistently failed to engage AE students in effective primary and preventative care that includes their wha??nau/family. Signi!cant changes to the current New Zealand health system are required to provide appropriate and effective health care for students attending AE facilities.

    View record details
  • Risk factors of poisoning: findings from the New Zealand Blood Donors??? Health Study

    Peiris-John, Roshini; Reid, Mary-Jane; Lee, Arier; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2016-09)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Marijuana use and excess risk of injury events: findings from a large prospective cohort study

    Ameratunga, Shanthi; Peiris-John, Roshini; Reid, Mary-Jane; Lee, Arier; Smith, GS; Norton, R (2016)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • The Spectrum Captured: A Methodological Approach to Studying Incidence and Outcomes of Traumatic Brain Injury on a Population Level

    Theadom, Alice; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Feigin, Valery L.; Starkey, Nicola J.; Jones, Kelly; Jones, Amy; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Barber, P. Alan (2012)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Objective: Drawing on the experience of conducting the Brain Injury Incidence and Outcomes New Zealand in the Community study, this article aims to identify the issues arising from the implementation of proposed guidelines for population-based studies of incidence and outcomes in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Study Design and Setting: All new cases of TBI (all ages and severities) were ascertained over a 1-year period, using overlapping prospective and retrospective sources of case ascertainment in New Zealand. All eligible TBI cases were invited to participate in a comprehensive assessment at baseline and at 1-month follow-up. Results: Our experience to date has revealed the feasibility of case ascertainment methods. Consultation with community health services and professionals resulted in feasible referral pathways to support the identification of TBI cases. ‘Hot pursuit’ methods of recruitment were essential to ensure complete case ascertainment for this population with few additional cases of TBI identified through cross-checks. Conclusion: This review of proposed guidelines in relation to practical study methodology provides a framework for future comparable population-based epidemiological studies of TBI incidence and outcomes in developed countries.

    View record details
  • Widening the lens on child health

    Kearns, Robin; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Neuwelt, Patricia (2005)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this issue of the Journal, Shaw, Blakely, Crampton, and Atkinson1 provide stark evidence of inequalities in child mortality across a range of causes. Their findings provide another sobering reminder that the clich?? of New Zealand being ???a great place to bring up kids??? holds true for some, but it cannot be presumed to be the case for all.

    View record details
  • Organisational travel plans for improving health.

    Hosking, JE; Macmillan, Alexandra; Connor, JL; Bullen, Christopher; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Travel plans are programmes that aim to change travel behaviour. If successful they are likely to change health related outcomes, with the possibility of risks as well as benefits. It is not currently clear how travel plans will affect health, and this systematic review aims to assess the effects of organisational travel plans on a variety of health outcomes.

    View record details
  • Student Engagement in very Large Classes: the teachers' perspective

    Exeter, Daniel; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Ratima, Matiu; Morton, Susan; Dickson, M; Hsu, Dennis; Jackson, Rodney (2010-10)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The rapid growth in the student population observed in higher education over the past 10???15 years in some countries has coincided with an increased recognition of student engagement and its value in developing knowledge. Active learning approaches have the potential to promote student engagement with lectures, but this becomes more challenging as class sizes increase. This study investigates student engagement from the teachers??? perspective, to identify current practices in teaching, learning and assessment designed to promote student engagement in courses with more than 1000 students enrolled at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. The study is based on semi???structured interviews with six course coordinators. The results demonstrate that teaching techniques commonly associated with small???class teaching can be used to engage students in very large classes. The effectiveness of these approaches from the students??? perspectives warrants further investigation.

    View record details
  • A Cochrane systematic review of the effectiveness of organisational travel plans: Improving the evidence base for transport decisions

    Macmillan, AK; Hosking, J; L Connor, J; Bullen, Christopher; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2013)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Population dependence on car use has adverse health consequences including road traffic injury, physical inactivity, air pollution and social severance. Widespread car dependence also entrenches lifestyles that require unsustainable levels of energy use. Most transport policies explicitly include goals for public health and sustainability. Transport interventions can therefore be seen as complex public health programmes, and assessing their outcomes against health and sustainability goals is vital. Using organisational travel plans (OTPs) as an example, we demonstrate how best practice epidemiological systematic reviews can be used to assess the existing evidence to inform transport policy. Such a synthesis of the evidence for OTPs has not been undertaken previously. Methods: We undertook a rigorous systematic review in accordance with a peer reviewed protocol to assess the effects of OTPs on individual and population health. We defined OTPs as travel behaviour change programmes conducted in a workplace or education setting. We included published and unpublished randomised controlled trials and controlled before and after studies, where the measured outcomes included change in travel mode or health. Results: 17 studies were included. One study directly measured health outcomes, and all studies measured change in travel mode. The overall methodological validity of studies was poor. The highest quality studies reported mixed effects on travel mode in the school setting. An isolated randomised controlled trial in a workplace suggests that reductions in car use are possible by people already contemplating or preparing for change to active travel. Conclusions: Despite widespread implementation, there is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of organisational travel plans for improving health or changing travel mode. Given the current lack of evidence, new OTP programmes should be implemented in the context of robustly-designed research studies, accounting for potential adverse effects such as child pedestrian injury. Cochrane systematic review methods used in partnerships between public health and transport planners can help achieve transport policy goals. ?? 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    View record details
  • Auckland beachgoer's perception of drowning risk and water safety behaviours

    McCool, Judith; Moran, Kevin; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2006)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • A Population-Based Cohort Study of Longer-Term Changes in Health of Car Drivers Involved in Serious Crashes

    Ameratunga, Shanthi; Norton, Robyn; Connor, Jennie; Robinson, Elizabeth; Civil, Ian; Coverdale, John (2006)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Study objective: Evidence about the burden of disability after motor vehicle crashes has relied primarily on trauma center??? based studies. We examine the impact of serious crashes on the longer-term health of car drivers, independent of natural variation, in a population-based study in Auckland, New Zealand. Methods: The study population comprised 218 car drivers surviving nonfatal crashes in Auckland, in which at least 1 occupant in the vehicle was admitted to a hospital, and a representative sample of 254 car drivers in the region, recruited from roadside surveys. All participants were interviewed at recruitment (subjects reported their precrash health) and 5 and 18 months later. The drivers??? changes in health were obtained with a global health transition indicator and the Short Form-36, with analyses adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Compared with 7% of drivers in the comparison group, 43% of crash drivers admitted to the hospital (adjusted odds ratio 10.4; 95% con???dence interval 5.5 to 19.6) and 20% of those not admitted (odds ratio 3.3; 95% con???dence interval 1.4 to 8.3) reported that their overall health at 18-month followup was worse than at baseline (precrash). Among the drivers reporting worsened health, prospectively ascertained Short Form-36 scores revealed greater reductions in physical health in those admitted after the crash, but these scores improved from 5 to 18 months. In contrast, mental and general health scores worsened from 5 to 18 months in admitted and nonadmitted crash drivers. Conclusion: A substantial proportion of drivers surviving serious crashes experience reductions in longer-term health, a burden likely to be underappreciated among those not admitted to a hospital. Emergency departments could serve as useful settings in which to develop and validate clinical decision rules that can help target services for crash survivors at increased risk of adverse outcomes.

    View record details
  • Children admitted to hospital following unintentional injury: perspectives of health service providers in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Ameratunga, Shanthi; Abel, ST; Tin Tin, Sandar; Asiasiga, L; Milne, S; Crengle, Suzanne (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death and hospitalisation among New Zealand children, with indigenous M??ori and ethnic minority Pacific children significantly over represented in these statistics. International research has shown that many children hospitalised for injury, as well as their families experience high levels of stress, and ethnic disparities in the quality of trauma care are not uncommon. The research on which this paper is based sought to identify key issues and concerns for New Zealand's multi-ethnic community following hospitalisation for childhood injury in order to inform efforts to improve the quality of trauma services. This paper reports on service providers' perspectives complementing previously published research on the experiences of families of injured children. METHODS: A qualitative research design involving eleven in-depth individual interviews and three focus groups was used to elicit the views of 21 purposefully selected service provider key informants from a range of professional backgrounds involved in the care and support of injured children and their families in Auckland, New Zealand. Interviews were transcribed and data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Key issues identified by service providers included limited ability to meet the needs of children with mild injuries, particularly their emotional needs; lack of psychological support for families; some issues related to M??ori and Pacific family support services; lack of accessible and comprehensive information for children and families; poor staff continuity and coordination; and poor coordination of hospital and community services, including inadequacies in follow-up plans. There was considerable agreement between these issues and those identified by the participant families. CONCLUSIONS: The identified issues and barriers indicate the need for interventions for service improvement at systemic, provider and patient levels. Of particular relevance are strategies that enable families to have better access to information, including culturally appropriate oral and written sources; improve communication amongst staff and between staff and families; and carefully developed discharge plans that provide care continuity across boundaries between hospital and community settings. M??ori and Pacific family support services are important and need better resourcing and support from an organisational culture responsive to the needs of these populations.

    View record details
  • Youth with cerebral palsy with differing upper limb abilities: How do they access computers?

    Davies, Theresa; Chau, T; Fehlings, D; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Stott, Ngaire (2010-12-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    ABSTRACT. Davies TC, Chau T, Fehlings DL, Ameratunga S, Stott NS. Youth with cerebral palsy with differing upper limb abilities: how do they access computers? Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2010;91:1952-6. Objective: To identify the current level of awareness of different computer access technologies and the choices made regarding mode of access by youth with cerebral palsy (CP) and their families. Design: Survey. Setting: Two tertiary-level rehabilitation centers in New Zealand and Canada. Participants: Youth (N 60) with CP, Manual Ability Classification Scale (MACS) levels I to V, age 13 to 25 years. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure: Questionnaire. Results: Fifty (83%) of the 60 youth were aware of at least 1 available assistive technology (AT), such as touch screens and joysticks. However, only 34 youth (57%) were familiar with the accessibility options currently available in the most common operating systems. Thirty-three (94%) of 35 youth who were MACS I and II used a standard mouse and keyboard, while few chose to use assistive technology or accessibility options. In contrast, 10 (40%) of 25 youth who were MACS III to V used a variety of assistive technologies such as touch screens, joysticks, trackballs, and scanning technologies. This group also had the highest use of accessibility options, although only 15 (60%) of the 25 were aware of them. Conclusion: Most youth with CP were aware of, and used, assistive technologies to enhance their computer access but were less knowledgeable about accessibility options. Accessibility options allow users to modify their own computer interface and can thus enhance computer access for youth with CP. Clinicians should be knowledgeable enough to give informed advice in this area of computer access, thus ensuring that all youth with CP can benefit from both AT and accessibility options, as required.

    View record details