87 results for Ameratunga, Shanthi

  • Riding in a motor vehicle with a driver under the influence of alcohol and drinking patterns: findings from a national survey of New Zealand youth

    Tin Tin, S; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Watson, Peter (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Objective. To investigate the relationships between the risks of riding in a motor vehicle with a driver under the influence of alcohol and young people's drinking patterns and usual drinking locations. Methods. A secondary analysis was undertaken of Youth2000 data - the first nationally representative youth health survey conducted in 2001. The study base comprised all secondary schools with more than 50 students enrolled in years 9 to 13 (ages 12 to 18 years). An anonymous multi-media computer-assisted interview survey collected information on drinking patterns, locations, and if the respondent had ridden in a motor vehicle with a driver who was under the influence of alcohol during the previous 30 days. Results. Of the 9,567 respondents, 27.8% reported riding with a driver who had been drinking alcohol and 27.4% reported riding with a driver who had consumed more than two glasses of alcohol in the two hours before travel (36.4% responded 'yes' to one or other item). After adjusting for age and gender, binge drinking, drinking in cars, at parties and outdoors, and drinking in the company of friends were associated with a significantly increased risk of riding in a motor vehicle driven by a driver under the influence of alcohol. This risk was not apparent among adolescents who usually consumed alcohol at home and those who usually drank with family. Conclusions. The findings indicate the need to consider how and where adolescents drink to inform effective public policies that can reduce alcohol-related harm and road traffic injury.

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  • Bicycle travel, injury risk and conspicuity: Findings from a PhD project in New Zealand

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2015-08)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Regular cycling provides health, environmental and economic benefits but is rarely part of everyday travel for many people. The real and perceived risk of injury is commonly cited as a significant deterrent to engaging in such activity and motor vehicles are regarded as a particular threat. Bicycle-motor vehicle collisions often result from the driver's failure to detect the cyclist in time, suggesting that conspicuity may be a contributing factor. This paper provides an overview of bicycle travel, injury risk and conspicuity in New Zealand, based on the findings of a PhD research project conducted in 2008-14. The findings of the Taupo Bicycle Study, a prospective cohort study involving 2,590 adult cyclists, were used in conjunction with aggregate or de-identified data from routinely collected national databases.

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  • Organisational travel plans for improving health.

    Hosking, JE; Macmillan, Alexandra; Connor, JL; Bullen, Christopher; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Travel plans are programmes that aim to change travel behaviour. If successful they are likely to change health related outcomes, with the possibility of risks as well as benefits. It is not currently clear how travel plans will affect health, and this systematic review aims to assess the effects of organisational travel plans on a variety of health outcomes.

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  • What influences the association between previous and future crashes among cyclists.

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-10-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Auckland beachgoer's perception of drowning risk and water safety behaviours

    McCool, Judith; Moran, Kevin; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2006)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Hand-held internet tablets for school-based data collection

    Denny, Simon; Milfont, Taciano; Utter, Jennifer; Robinson, Elizabeth; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Merry, Sally; Fleming, Theresa; Watson, Peter (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. BACKGROUND:In the last 20 years, researchers have been using computer self-administered questionnaires to gather data on a wide range of adolescent health related behaviours. More recently, researchers collecting data in schools have started to use smaller hand-held computers for their ease of use and portability. The aim of this study is to describe a new technology with wi-fi enabled hand-held internet tablets and to compare adolescent preferences of laptop computers or hand-held internet tablets in administering a youth health and well-being questionnaire in a school setting.METHODS:A total of 177 students took part in a pilot study of a national youth health and wellbeing survey. Students were randomly assigned to internet tablets or laptops at the start of the survey and were changed to the alternate mode of administration about half-way through the questionnaire. Students at the end of the questionnaire were asked which of the two modes of administration (1) they preferred, (2) was easier to use, (3) was more private and confidential, and (4) was easier to answer truthfully.RESULTS:Many students expressed no preference between laptop computers or internet tablets. However, among the students who expressed a preference between laptop computers or internet tablets, the majority of students found the internet tablets more private and confidential (p < 0.001) and easier to answer questions truthfully (p < 0.001) compared to laptop computers.CONCLUSION:This study demonstrates that using wi-fi enabled hand-held internet tablets is a feasible methodology for school-based surveys especially when asking about sensitive information.

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  • Acute poisoning fatalities and hospitalisations among children and youth in New Zealand

    Peiris-John, Roshini; Kool, Bridget; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2012)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background Globally, poisoning accounts for a significant proportion of deaths among children and young people aged 0–24 years. However, few studies have examined changes in the epidemiologic characteristics across this age group and explored the particular features that could inform targeted intervention strategies. Aim To determine demographic patterns and substances related to acute poisoning fatalities and hospital admissions among children (0–14 years) and youth (15–24 years) in New Zealand. Methods Using the national mortality (1999–2008) and morbidity (2000–2009) databases compiled by the New Zealand Ministry of Health, ICD external cause data corresponding to relevant poisoning events were extracted and analysed. Results During the 10-year period, 286 fatalities and 15 626 primary hospital admissions accounted for mean annual rates of 2.0 and 108.6/100 000 young people aged 0–24 years, respectively. Over half of the deaths and hospitalisations were due to intentional poisoning which occurred mainly among youth aged 15–24 years. Most unintentional poisoning hospitalisations were among children aged less than 5 years. In general, young people of European and Maori ethnicities and those residing in socio-economically deprived neighbourhoods were over-represented among poisoning events. While most deaths were due to carbon monoxide toxicity, most hospitalisations for poisonings were due to pharmacological drugs. Significance The burden of poisoning among young people in New Zealand is substantial with important differences in related demographic and injury characteristics. Age-specific prevention strategies targeting exposure to carbon monoxide and pharmacological drugs and suicide prevention strategies more generally require particular attention. The leading cause of infant and under 5-years' child burn mortality was contact with hot drinks and foods (31.6%, 45.6%) in 2009. According to the study report of Mongolia, the median age of child death of burn was 3.0. Therefore child burn is the public health priority issues that need comprehensive policies and measures in order to reduce the incidence of child burn in Mongolia. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of child burn among Ulaanbaatar. The study involved a total number of 793 children of 711 families from the Ulaanbaatar, randomly. The age range was 0–5, of which 50.7% were boys. A total of 51.3% attend in daycare centres. 17.9% of the total surveyed children were injured within the last year, of which 8.1% were resulted from burns. A total of 83.3% of burned children were at home when accidents happened. Only 41.7% of the surveyed family members stated that the children burned themselves. The family members were asked during the survey: ‘what to do when your child gets burned’. Out of the total, 38.7% indicated that they would treat it by soap, 49.1% by sugar, 39.6% by blood of dogs, and of which 51% would treat by raw meat. This study identified that almost all of these burn incidents occurred in environment among the children under 5 years old. This study concludes that the family members have inadequate knowledge about child accident prevention programme and the first-aid treatment.

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  • The role of conspicuity in bicycle crashes involving a motor vehicle

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-10-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Why is the risk of bicycle crash injury higher in the Auckland region?: Findings from the Taupo Bicycle Study.

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-10-06)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Social and physical contexts of schools and neighborhoods: Associations with physical activity among young people in New Zealand

    Utter, J; Denny, Simon; Robinson, E; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Milfont, TL (2011-09)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Objectives. We sought to determine the association between school- and neighborhood-level characteristics and physical activity among young people.Methods. We collected the data as part of Youth'07, a nationally representative survey of the health and well-being of high school students in New Zealand. In total, 9107 students from 96 schools participated (63% response rate). Students answered questions about their schools (e.g., support for physical activity) and neighborhoods (e.g., community cohesion, disintegration, safety, and recreational facilities). We created school-level measures by aggregating the students' reports within their schools and we created neighborhood-level measures by aggregating the students' reports of their neighborhoods to the census area unit of their residential address. We conducted analyses by using cross-classified random-effects models controlling for individual variables, with school and neighborhoods treated as random effects.Results. Schools characterized by high sports team participation and neighborhoods characterized by high social connections were positively associated with student physical activity. We observed few other significant characteristics of school and neighborhood environments.Conclusions. Our findings highlight that opportunity for sports participation and strong social connections in neighborhoods are particularly important for youths' physical activity. (Am J Public Health. 2011;101:1690-1695. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2011.300171)

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  • Taking a risk perceptions approach to improving beach swimming safety

    McCool, Judith; Moran, Kevin; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Robinson, Elizabeth (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Incidence of traumatic brain injury in New Zealand: A population-based study

    Feigin, Valery L.; Theadom, Alice; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Starkey, Nicola J.; McPherson, Kathryn; Kahan, Michael; Dowell, Anthony; Brown, Paul; Parag, Varsha; Kydd, Robert; Jones, Kelly; Jones, Amy; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of long-term disability in children and young adults worldwide. However, accurate information about its incidence does not exist. We aimed to estimate the burden of TBI in rural and urban populations in New Zealand across all ages and TBI severities. Methods We did a population-based incidence study in an urban (Hamilton) and rural (Waikato District) population in New Zealand. We registered all cases of TB! (admitted to hospital or not, fatal or non-fatal) that occurred in the population between March 1, 2010, and Feb 28, 2011, using multiple overlapping sources of information. We calculated incidence per 100 000 person-years with 95% CIs using a Poisson distribution. We calculated rate ratios [RRs] to compare the age-standardised rates between sex, ethnicity, and residency (urban, rural) groups. We used direct standardisation to age-standardise the rates to the world population. Results The total incidence of TBI per 100 000 person-years was 790 cases (95% CI 749-832); incidence per 100 000 person-years of mild TBI was 749 cases (709-790) and of moderate to severe TBI was 41 cases (31-51). Children (aged 0-14 years) and adolescents and young adults (aged 15-34 years) constituted almost 70% of all TBI cases. TBI affected boys and men more than women and girls (RR 1.77,95% CI 1.58-1.97). Most TBI cases were due to falls (38% [516 of 1369]), mechanical forces (21% [288 of 1369]), transport accidents (20% [277 of 1369]), and assaults (17% [228 of 1369]). Compared with people of European origin, Maori people had a greater risk of mild TBI (RR 1.23, 95% CI 1.08-1.39). Incidence of moderate to severe TBI in the rural population (73 per 100 000 person-years [95% CI 50-107]) was almost 2.5 times greater than in the urban population (31 per 100 000 person-years [23-42]). Interpretation Our findings suggest that the incidence of TBI, especially mild TBI, in New Zealand is far greater than would be estimated from the findings of previous studies done in other high-income countries. Our age-specific and residency-specific data for TBI incidence overall and by mechanism of injury should be considered when planning prevention and TBI care services.

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  • Cost of traumatic brain injury in New Zealand: Evidence from a population-based study.

    Te Ao, Braden; Brown, Paul; Tobias, Martin; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Theadom, Alice; McPherson, Kathryn; Starkey, Nicola J.; Dowell, Anthony; Jones, Kelly; Feigin, Valery L. (2014-09)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to estimate from a societal perspective the 1-year and lifetime direct and indirect costs of traumatic brain injury (TBI) for New Zealand (NZ) in 2010 projected to 2020. METHODS: An incidence-based cost of illness model was developed using data from the Brain Injury Outcomes New Zealand in the Community Study. Details of TBI-related resource use during the first 12 months after injury were obtained for 725 cases using resource utilization information from participant surveys and medical records. Total costs are presented in US dollars year 2010 value. RESULTS: In 2010, 11,301 first-ever TBI cases were estimated to have occurred in NZ; total first-year cost of all new TBI cases was estimated to be US $47.9 million with total prevalence costs of US $101.4 million. The average cost per new TBI case during the first 12 months and over a lifetime was US $5,922 (95% confidence interval [CI] $4,777-$7,858), varying from US $4,636 (95% CI $3,756-$5,561) for mild cases to US $36,648 (95% CI $16,348-$65,350) for moderate/severe cases. Because of the unexpectedly large number of mild TBI cases (95% of all TBI cases), the total cost of treating these cases is nearly 3 times that of moderate/severe. The total lifetime cost of all TBI survivors in 2010 was US $146.5 million and is expected to increase to US $177.1 million in 2020. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that there is an urgent need to develop effective interventions to prevent both mild and moderate/severe TBI.

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  • The Spectrum Captured: A Methodological Approach to Studying Incidence and Outcomes of Traumatic Brain Injury on a Population Level

    Theadom, Alice; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Feigin, Valery L.; Starkey, Nicola J.; Jones, Kelly; Jones, Amy; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Barber, P. Alan (2012)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Objective: Drawing on the experience of conducting the Brain Injury Incidence and Outcomes New Zealand in the Community study, this article aims to identify the issues arising from the implementation of proposed guidelines for population-based studies of incidence and outcomes in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Study Design and Setting: All new cases of TBI (all ages and severities) were ascertained over a 1-year period, using overlapping prospective and retrospective sources of case ascertainment in New Zealand. All eligible TBI cases were invited to participate in a comprehensive assessment at baseline and at 1-month follow-up. Results: Our experience to date has revealed the feasibility of case ascertainment methods. Consultation with community health services and professionals resulted in feasible referral pathways to support the identification of TBI cases. ‘Hot pursuit’ methods of recruitment were essential to ensure complete case ascertainment for this population with few additional cases of TBI identified through cross-checks. Conclusion: This review of proposed guidelines in relation to practical study methodology provides a framework for future comparable population-based epidemiological studies of TBI incidence and outcomes in developed countries.

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  • Sports-related brain injury in the general population: An epidemiological study

    Theadom, Alice; Starkey, NJ; Dowell, T; Hume, PA; Kahan, M; McPherson, K; Feigin, V; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Kydd, R; Parag, V; Brown, P; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Christey, G; Jones, K; Jones, A; Hardaker, N; Te Ao, B (2014-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Objectives: To determine the incidence, nature and severity of all sports-related brain injuries in the general population. Design: Population-based epidemiological incidence study. Methods: Data on all traumatic brain injury events sustained during a sports-related activity were extracted from a dataset of all new traumatic brain injury cases (both fatal and non-fatal), identified over a one-year period in the Hamilton and Waikato districts of New Zealand. Prospective and retrospective case ascertainment methods from multiple sources were used. All age groups and levels of traumatic brain injury severity were included. Details of the registering injuries and recurrent injuries sustained over the subsequent year were obtained through medical/accident records and assessment interviews with participants. Results: Of 1369 incident traumatic brain injury cases, 291 were identified as being sustained during a sports-related activity (21% of all traumatic brain injuries) equating to an incidence rate of 170 per 100,000 of the general population. Recurrent injuries occurred more frequently in adults (11%) than children (5%). Of the sports-related injuries 46% were classified as mild with a high risk of complications. Injuries were most frequently sustained during rugby, cycling and equestrian activities. It was revealed that up to 19% of traumatic brain injuries were not recorded in medical notes. Conclusions: Given the high incidence of new and recurrent traumatic brain injury and the high risk of complications following injury, further sport specific injury prevention strategies are urgently needed to reduce the impact of traumatic brain injury and facilitate safer engagement in sports activities. The high levels of ???missed??? traumatic brain injuries, highlights the importance in raising awareness of traumatic brain injury during sports-related activity in the general population.

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  • Atrial fibrillation and cycling: six year follow-up of the Taupo bicycle study

    Woodward, Alistair; Tin Tin, Sandar; Doughty, Robert; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2015-01-21)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, and the incidence of AF is increased markedly among elite athletes. It is not clear how lesser levels of physical activity in the general population influence AF. We asked whether participation in the Taupo Cycle Challenge was associated with increased hospital admissions due to AF, and within the cohort, whether admissions for AF were related to frequency and intensity of cycling.Participants in the 2006 Lake Taupo Cycle Challenge, New Zealand's largest mass cycling event, were invited to complete an on-line questionnaire. Those who agreed (n = 2590, response rate = 43.1%) were followed up by record linkage via the National Minimum Health Database from December 1 2006 until June 30 2013, to identify admissions to hospital due to AF.The age and gender standardized admission rate for AF was similar in the Taupo cohort (19.60 per 10,000 per year) and the national population over the same period (2006-2011) (19.45 per 10,000 per year). Within the study cohort (men only), for every additional hour spent cycling per week the risk changed by 0.90 (95% confidence interval 0.79 - 1.01). This result did not change appreciably after adjustment for age and height.Hospital admission due to AF was not increased above the national rate in this group of non-elite cyclists, and within the group the rate of AF did not increase with amount of cycling. The level of activity undertaken by this cohort of cyclists was, on average, not sufficient to increase the risk of hospitalization for AF.

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  • A Population-Based Cohort Study of Longer-Term Changes in Health of Car Drivers Involved in Serious Crashes

    Ameratunga, Shanthi; Norton, Robyn; Connor, Jennie; Robinson, Elizabeth; Civil, Ian; Coverdale, John (2006)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Study objective: Evidence about the burden of disability after motor vehicle crashes has relied primarily on trauma center??? based studies. We examine the impact of serious crashes on the longer-term health of car drivers, independent of natural variation, in a population-based study in Auckland, New Zealand. Methods: The study population comprised 218 car drivers surviving nonfatal crashes in Auckland, in which at least 1 occupant in the vehicle was admitted to a hospital, and a representative sample of 254 car drivers in the region, recruited from roadside surveys. All participants were interviewed at recruitment (subjects reported their precrash health) and 5 and 18 months later. The drivers??? changes in health were obtained with a global health transition indicator and the Short Form-36, with analyses adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Compared with 7% of drivers in the comparison group, 43% of crash drivers admitted to the hospital (adjusted odds ratio 10.4; 95% con???dence interval 5.5 to 19.6) and 20% of those not admitted (odds ratio 3.3; 95% con???dence interval 1.4 to 8.3) reported that their overall health at 18-month followup was worse than at baseline (precrash). Among the drivers reporting worsened health, prospectively ascertained Short Form-36 scores revealed greater reductions in physical health in those admitted after the crash, but these scores improved from 5 to 18 months. In contrast, mental and general health scores worsened from 5 to 18 months in admitted and nonadmitted crash drivers. Conclusion: A substantial proportion of drivers surviving serious crashes experience reductions in longer-term health, a burden likely to be underappreciated among those not admitted to a hospital. Emergency departments could serve as useful settings in which to develop and validate clinical decision rules that can help target services for crash survivors at increased risk of adverse outcomes.

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  • Children admitted to hospital following unintentional injury: perspectives of health service providers in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Ameratunga, Shanthi; Abel, ST; Tin Tin, Sandar; Asiasiga, L; Milne, S; Crengle, Suzanne (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death and hospitalisation among New Zealand children, with indigenous M??ori and ethnic minority Pacific children significantly over represented in these statistics. International research has shown that many children hospitalised for injury, as well as their families experience high levels of stress, and ethnic disparities in the quality of trauma care are not uncommon. The research on which this paper is based sought to identify key issues and concerns for New Zealand's multi-ethnic community following hospitalisation for childhood injury in order to inform efforts to improve the quality of trauma services. This paper reports on service providers' perspectives complementing previously published research on the experiences of families of injured children. METHODS: A qualitative research design involving eleven in-depth individual interviews and three focus groups was used to elicit the views of 21 purposefully selected service provider key informants from a range of professional backgrounds involved in the care and support of injured children and their families in Auckland, New Zealand. Interviews were transcribed and data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Key issues identified by service providers included limited ability to meet the needs of children with mild injuries, particularly their emotional needs; lack of psychological support for families; some issues related to M??ori and Pacific family support services; lack of accessible and comprehensive information for children and families; poor staff continuity and coordination; and poor coordination of hospital and community services, including inadequacies in follow-up plans. There was considerable agreement between these issues and those identified by the participant families. CONCLUSIONS: The identified issues and barriers indicate the need for interventions for service improvement at systemic, provider and patient levels. Of particular relevance are strategies that enable families to have better access to information, including culturally appropriate oral and written sources; improve communication amongst staff and between staff and families; and carefully developed discharge plans that provide care continuity across boundaries between hospital and community settings. M??ori and Pacific family support services are important and need better resourcing and support from an organisational culture responsive to the needs of these populations.

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  • Alcohol intake, marijuana use, and sleep deprivation on the risk of falls occurring at home among young and middle-aged adults: a case-crossover study. Original Article

    Thornley, Simon; Kool, Bridget; Marshall, Roger; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-11-28)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aim This study investigated whether hospitalised fall-related injuries among young and middle-aged adults were associated with short term effects of alcohol intake, marijuana use and sleep deprivation. Method A case-crossover design was used to study 690 adults (aged 20 to 64 years) admitted to public hospitals within 48 hours of a fall related injury, occurring at home, in three regions of New Zealand during August 2008 to December 2009. A matched-pair interval method of analysis was used to compare alcohol intake, marijuana use and sleep deprivation before the event with similar information in two control periods: 24 hours-before and one week-before the time of injury. Results After adjustment for other paired exposures, the estimated risk of injury was substantially higher after consuming alcohol within the preceding six hours, with a dose response gradient. After adjusting for confounding variables, the data did not support a significantly elevated risk of fall-related injury associated with sleep deprivation (<6 hours sleep in the preceding 24 hours), or marijuana use in the preceding three hours. Conclusion The findings support the expansion of efforts to reduce the harmful effects of alcohol intake in the home environment.

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  • New Zealand Diabetes Cohort Study cardiovascular risk score for people with Type 2 diabetes: validation in the PREDICT cohort

    Robinson, Thomas; Elley, Carolyn; Wells, Linda; Robinson, E; Kenealy, Timothy; Pylypchuk, Romana; Bramley, D; Arroll, Bruce; Crengle, S; Riddell, Tania; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Metcalf, Patricia; Drury, PL (2012-09-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    INTRODUCTION: New Zealand (NZ) guidelines recommend treating people for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk on the basis of five-year absolute risk using a NZ adaptation of the Framingham risk equation. A diabetes-specific Diabetes Cohort Study (DCS) CVD predictive risk model has been developed and validated using NZ Get Checked data. AIM: To revalidate the DCS model with an independent cohort of people routinely assessed using PREDICT, a web-based CVD risk assessment and management programme. METHODS: People with Type 2 diabetes without pre-existing CVD were identified amongst people who had a PREDICT risk assessment between 2002 and 2005. From this group we identified those with sufficient data to allow estimation of CVD risk with the DCS models. We compared the DCS models with the NZ Framingham risk equation in terms of discrimination, calibration, and reclassification implications. RESULTS: Of 3044 people in our study cohort, 1829 people had complete data and therefore had CVD risks calculated. Of this group, 12.8% (235) had a cardiovascular event during the five-year follow-up. The DCS models had better discrimination than the currently used equation, with C-statistics being 0.68 for the two DCS models and 0.65 for the NZ Framingham model. DISCUSSION: The DCS models were superior to the NZ Framingham equation at discriminating people with diabetes who will have a cardiovascular event. The adoption of a DCS model would lead to a small increase in the number of people with diabetes who are treated with medication, but potentially more CVD events would be avoided.

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