3 results for Amoamo, Maria

  • Image formation and its contribution to tourism development in Canada's northwest territories: Past and present

    Amoamo, Maria (2003-12)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Tourism research has traditionally focused on the demand side of tourist motivation and behavioural patterns to discover why tourists visit particular destinations. This thesis explored from a supply side perspective, how image and language are used by tourism suppliers/operators to promote destinations and how such images change over time in response to consumer demand. The study focused on the representation of natural and cultural heritage in the region of Northwest Territories Canada. It compared visual and oral components of the region's heritage, history, and early literature with contemporary travel literature. Interviews with tourism suppliers and tour operators revealed their motivation in using such components to promote their products. Literary representations of destinations motivate travellers to travel, however, the same representations evoke imagery that may not be confirmed by the actual travel experience. In order to examine tourists' experiences, the related concepts of image and authenticity were studied. Any gap between imagery and experience may impact on the traveller's sense of authenticity. It may be that a strong sense of authenticity in travel experience turns on 'perceptions of possibility' evoked by pre-travel image formation. Image is a dynamic concept and it was hoped that by comparing historical and contemporary travel literature, patterns would emerge of how such changes have affected tourism development in NWT. It was discovered that unique auras of destination image formation have developed over time through creative use of language and imagery. Tourism suppliers use such imagery to differentiate product and invoke existential desire in the mind of the potential visitor. The diversity of tourism products today means destinations must cater to a wider array of interests, constantly repackaging and re-imaging the products they offer. This study revealed that NWT tourism imagery has moved from promoting a natural heritage base to promoting a cultural heritage base. Matching the perceptions of tourists with the perceptions of travel providers leads to more effective consumer centred marketing and confirms the important role images play in providing an authentic visitor experience.

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  • Maori Business Networks in Dunedin: Waiho i te toipoto, kaua i te toiroa: Let us keep close together, not far apart

    Amoamo, Maria; Mirosa, Miranda; Tutakangahau, Hiria (2007-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is the result of a partnership and consequent research brief established between the University of Otago School of Business, Te Kupeka Umaka Maori Ki Araiteuru Inc. (KUMA), the Dunedin City Council, Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu and Te Tapuae o Rehua. The brief is principally concerned with the collection and analysis of information involving the KUMA (Southern Maori) business network, its current issues and needs and its contribution to the Dunedin economy. This information is presented in the context of published work about Maori enterprise activities in general; including the 2006 Hui Taumata initiative, Accelerating Maori Economic Development. Information was collected from nineteen Dunedin-based businesses in the KUMA network, using Kaupapa Maori principles that included face-to-face interviews. The interviews were tape recorded and then transcribed in ordinary English spelling for ease of reference. Over 20 hours of data was collected in this way. Apart from providing details about the businesses themselves, project findings focus on core issues and themes that are pertinent to successful business growth and development for network members. Key findings include: - The Hui Taumata call to develop people and enterprise for Maori business growth is emerging under the KUMA umbrella. Considerable social capital is evident in the network, but the connection between this capital and the development of Maori assets is an issue that requires significant attention. - KUMA is a young and forward-looking network that has potential to offer regional and national leadership in assisting with the development of Maori business activities. - Time, staffing and compliance issues were identified as the major barriers to current business development - Areas of business weakness that could benefit from professional development activities in the network include research development, marketing, management practices and administration. - The realisation that Maori must accept responsibility for their own actions is a key driving force behind the outcomes of Hui Taumata 2005. The project findings indicate that collective aspiration and the concept of ‘rangatiratanga’ (self-determination) are key motivating elements for launching Maori business start-ups. - Maori network membership is desirable because of the long term commitment to ‘whanaungatanga’ (kinship), rather than for reasons of financial gain. - The ability to network and to create successful businesses is not only about business success but also about the growing esteem and mana of a group of people who are clearly taking charge of their lives. In order to ensure that the KUMA network can be strengthened and developed for both local and national benefit, the following actions are recommended: - Mechanisms are explored to develop and strengthen the KUMA network, including financial support. - The KUMA network reviews its activities in line with members’ suggestions. - Appropriate encouragement and support is provided for senior Maori students to undertake further research in this field. - Executive education opportunities are explored through ongoing dialogue between the School of Business and project partners. - Funding for regional and national studies of other Maori networks is pursued in order to provide a more comprehensive profile of business values, needs and support mechanisms. - Long-term planning for the future global development of Maori businesses is explored between project partners. - The processes developed to generate this project are continued.

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  • Decolonising Māori tourism : representation and identity

    Amoamo, Maria (2008)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xii, 379 leaves :col. ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Tourism. "November 2008"

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