3 results for Bennetts, Bron, Thesis

  • The Bigger The Ship The Bigger The Mess: Large Ship Tourism in the Antarctic: A Recommendation

    Bennetts, Bron; Brabyn, Lars; Easton, Jenny; Rusbatch, Katie; Salem, Victoria (2002)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Recalling Recommendation VIII-9 that tourism is a natural development in the Antarctic and requires regulation. Reaffirming The Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty 1991 seeks to enhance the protection of the Antarctic environment and dependent and associated ecosystems. Recalling the Committee on Environmental Protection (CEP) set under Article 1 1 of The protocol on Environmental protection to the Antarctic Treaty provides advice on the means Of minimising or mitigating environmental activities in the Antarctic Treaty area. Recalling Working Group Two, set up by the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Parties to meet at Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meetings, provides advice on scientific research and operations in the Antarctic Treaty area. Acknowledging the need to prevent adverse environmental impacts by timely regulation, particularly as the grounding or sinking of a tourist ship could result in long-term environmental damage. Noting that ship borne tourism takes place in areas with high densities of wildlife, often during the breeding season. Noting that the nature of the Antarctic climate means that tourist ships can be exposed to extreme weather conditions. Recalling that the Antarctic Treaty System does not restrict the maximum passenger capacity of tourist ships. Noting the recent increase in the number of large tourist ships (800-1600 maximum passenger capacity) operating in Antarctic waters which are not members of the International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators (IAATO). Recalling Recommendation VIII-9 that tourism is a natural development in the Antarctic and requires regulation. Reaffirming The Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty 1991 seeks to enhance the protection of the Antarctic environment and dependent and associated ecosystems. Recalling the Committee on Environmental Protection (CEP) set under Article 1 1 of The protocol on Environmental protection to the Antarctic Treaty provides advice on the means Of minimising or mitigating environmental activities in the Antarctic Treaty area. Recalling Working Group Two, set up by the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Parties to meet at Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meetings, provides advice on scientific research and operations in the Antarctic Treaty area. Acknowledging the need to prevent adverse environmental impacts by timely regulation, particularly as the grounding or sinking of a tourist ship could result in long-term environmental damage. Noting that ship borne tourism takes place in areas with high densities of wildlife, often during the breeding season. Noting that the nature of the Antarctic climate means that tourist ships can be exposed to extreme weather conditions. Recalling that the Antarctic Treaty System does not restrict the maximum passenger capacity of tourist ships. Noting the recent increase in the number of large tourist ships (800-1600 maximum passenger capacity) operating in Antarctic waters which are not members of the International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators (IAATO).

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  • New Zealand and Antarctica; A Evolving Relationship

    Bennetts, Bron (2002)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    New Zealand's association with Antarctica is due essentially to the close geographical proximity of the two lands. Beginning with Captain James Cook in 1773 New Zealand's connection with Antarctica as a logistic support base continues today. The relationship between New Zealand and Antarctica has altered over the 229 years. Several key international and domestic events have contributed to evolving relationship. The, transformation of New Zealand from a British Colony into an independent nation, has had an influence on New Zealand's changing attitudes toward Antarctica. As New Zealand has matured as a nation, with growing understanding and confidence in the international environment, it's role has changed from" last port Of call" for expeditions of discovery, to one of active environmental advocacy for Antarctica. New Zealand's association with Antarctica is due essentially to the close geographical proximity of the two lands. Beginning with Captain James Cook in 1773 New Zealand's connection with Antarctica as a logistic support base continues today. The relationship between New Zealand and Antarctica has altered over the 229 years. Several key international and domestic events have contributed to evolving relationship. The, transformation of New Zealand from a British Colony into an independent nation, has had an influence on New Zealand's changing attitudes toward Antarctica. As New Zealand has matured as a nation, with growing understanding and confidence in the international environment, it's role has changed from" last port Of call" for expeditions of discovery, to one of active environmental advocacy for Antarctica.

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  • Space to Place: The Cultural Landscape of Ross Island, Antarctica; A preliminary investigation

    Bennetts, Bron (2002)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Cultural landscapes are the landscapes that people have modified or altered in some way, usually through settlement. The changes humans make to the landscape can be physical, (roads, buildings) or the changes can be perceptual. The way we interpret our landscapes reflects our values of it. Our perceptions are often expressed through our art.(paintings, poetry). Cultural landscapes tell the stories of people, events and places through time, they are a dynamic history of the interaction between human and nature, Cultural landscapes reflect the human values and ideologies that have created them, as well as the physical technologies that created them. Cultural landscapes may be iconic, famous places, or the everyday places that we live in. It is easy to understand the significance of special well-known places that are symbols Of our culture (Parliament Buildings and the Beehive in Wellington). These places give us a sense of national identity and feeling of belonging. Iconic landscapes, have obvious significance to people, and are valued by the community who care about their management. Conversely the landscapes that we live in everyday may appear so familiar and Ordinary' to us that they are 'invisible' and seem to have little significance. These taken for granted places are just as significant to our cultural heritage and sense of who we are, To be valued by the community, these landscapes need first to be understood. In land use planning terms we tend not to think about cultural landscapes until they are either under threat or have been already altered or lost.2 To appreciate the value of a cultural landscape serves as a foundation on which to build informed comment on future change and land management. Cultural landscapes are the landscapes that people have modified or altered in some way, usually through settlement. The changes humans make to the landscape can be physical, (roads, buildings) or the changes can be perceptual. The way we interpret our landscapes reflects our values of it. Our perceptions are often expressed through our art.(paintings, poetry). Cultural landscapes tell the stories of people, events and places through time, they are a dynamic history of the interaction between human and nature, Cultural landscapes reflect the human values and ideologies that have created them, as well as the physical technologies that created them. Cultural landscapes may be iconic, famous places, or the everyday places that we live in. It is easy to understand the significance of special well-known places that are symbols Of our culture (Parliament Buildings and the Beehive in Wellington). These places give us a sense of national identity and feeling of belonging. Iconic landscapes, have obvious significance to people, and are valued by the community who care about their management. Conversely the landscapes that we live in everyday may appear so familiar and Ordinary' to us that they are 'invisible' and seem to have little significance. These taken for granted places are just as significant to our cultural heritage and sense of who we are, To be valued by the community, these landscapes need first to be understood. In land use planning terms we tend not to think about cultural landscapes until they are either under threat or have been already altered or lost.2 To appreciate the value of a cultural landscape serves as a foundation on which to build informed comment on future change and land management.

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