8 results for Brown, Carol, Creative work

  • out the window breath bone feather

    Brown, Carol; Whitehead, G; Graham, F

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreographer Carol Brown Composer Gillian Whitehead Dramaturg Fiona Graham Design Kasia Pol Photographer Solomon Mortimer 'out the window breath bone feather' draws on the extraordinarily rich history of the Pah Homestead since its establishment in 1877, with its changing residents including landed gentry, servants, orphans, nuns, immigrants and broken families, acknowledging as well the prehistory and the site of the pre-European Whataroa Pah. 'out the window breath bone feather' approached collaboratively, explores the memories and stories that resonate through the house and landscape.

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  • REVOLVE An interactive performance

    Brown, Carol; Niemetz, A; Gander, P; Medlin, M; Scoones, R

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Co-conceived by Carol Brown and Anne Niemetz; dancing, choreography, spoken text and performance elements authored by Carol Brown; Anne Niemetz designed the wearable technology, interface system and filmed and edited the video compoent; Russell Scoones developed the recorded soundscape; Philippa Gander contributed expertise as a sleep scientist and co-researcher in the developmental stages of the project dramaturgy; Margie Medlin was responsible for the overall lighting design and related performance elements; additional contributors included Fiona Graham and Alys Longley who contributed to the development of the performance texts. REVOLVE is a real-time interactive performance that sheds light on the ‘stuff’ dreams are made of, the night-stories and bodily states that shape our sleeping hours. As an arts-science collaboration, the research imperative was to translate the data of a sleep scientist into sonic and choreographic content through wearable technologies. The work invites audiences to experience a series of states enfolding voice, sound, light, video and dance, as she metaphorically traces the path of the sleeper’s mind and body from dusk to dawn. Driven by a curiosity about the body, its rhythms and potential for change, the work alludes to the planetary, physiological and personal cycles that round our lives. In doing so, it explores how the non-literalness of scientific phenomena (data from EEG readings of brain waves) can be mapped through interactive performance and made meaningful as a series of performative states for audiences. The performance ecology enfolds wearable electronic sensor technology, video, lighting, text, recorded sound and an interactive sound environment within a choreographic score. Sensing the body, its gestures and its environment through the measurement of light, tilt and acceleration, Carol Brown wears a “sensor suit” that allows her to intuitively control and interact with a malleable sound environment. She can respond to this environment by choosing to expose or hide light-sensitive parts of her body and combining these actions with movements of varied speed. In turn, the sonic feedback influences the emerging choreographic score, inducing constraints and generative cyclic patterns for movement. The dramaturgy is driven by concepts based on the physiological cycles that underlie sleeping and waking, which are in turn shaped by our circadian biological clock that keeps our sleep/wake cycle coordinated with the rotation of the earth. REVOLVE includes scenes that are inspired by states such as light sleep – delving in and out of wakefulness; deep sleep – a state in which the brain’s neuronal activity synchs up to create very slow and large brainwaves; and REM sleep – a state characterised by nervous muscle twitches and rapid eye movements that come from an active, but sleeping brain. At the end of the performance there is a metaphorical breech into waking consciousness as the brain re-engages with the external world through purposeful and directed movement. The sound design is partially composed, and partially interactive. The composed sounds are sourced from EEG brainwaves, recordings of a sleeping child and the voice of tenor Keith Lewis. The interactive sounds are based on the auditory beat, a phenomenon that arises when two pure tones of different, but neighbouring frequencies are played together. In such a situation, a beat frequency emerges, perceived as a periodic pulsing of the sound. These beats – waves of sound - are powerful to listen to, physically moving, subsonic but clearly perceivable.

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  • Tongues of Stone : a Site Sensitive Performance

    Brown, Carol; Hannah, D

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Carol Brown - Choreography, Concept and Artistic Direction As a site-sensitive dance-architecture event, Tongues of Stone sought to transform the Central Business District of Perth, Western Australia, into a network of stories experienced through movement, sound and design, drawing attention to forgotten histories and the traumatic residue of colonialisation through performative encounters. Led from the Murray Street underground to the Swan River, the mobile audiences pathway followed an itinerary of lost wetlands and disappeared lakes covered over by urban development and infrastructure. Listening to MP4 recordings on headsets, the soundscape contained traces of three different stories adapted from writings by Ovid, Carol Anne Duffy and Audrey Fernandez-Satar. This collage of interwoven stories obliquely referenced the diverse understandings and temporalities of the city as it is re-imagined through mytho-poetic invention. A woman who has lost her tongue struggles to communicate with her newly wed sister; another reads her body like the map of a city that is both foreign and familiar; a chorus of water-carriers remember and trace tributaries of ancient wetlands; and a girl-band plays their bodies like angry instruments against the concrete facades; a long red dress becomes a tongue and the ancient Wagyl of Nyungar Dreamtime. Tongues of Stone re-imagined Perth as a place of many stories streaming through its streets, laneways and civic sites. As a work of critical engagement with the city it sought to awaken perceptions to the echoes and resonances of subterannean fluids now buried by development, to promote a sense of engagement with urban space that is enchanting and de-familiarising encouraging ecological stewardship whilst empowering the presence of women in the city to transform behaviours and promote new ways of engaging citizenship in civic life.

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  • SLIP I'm not falling I'm just hanging on for as long you'll hold me Dance Theatre Work for Touch Compass

    Brown, Carol; Scoones, R; Ransley, E

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography and Artistic Direction by Carol Brown Music and Sound Design by Russell Scoones Costumes by Emma Ransley What if the stories we carry around with us were to focus upon the contingent and the accidental? What if we acknowledge chance and slippage as our condition? The research imperative was to create a performance work that represented the individual stories of the dancers through movement and text. Using spoken and sung texts the challenge was to create an experience that communicated their inner lives in an unsentimental way. By translating their stories into song and creating a five song cycle for the work the choreography was able to move between the individual and the group opening spaces for an unsentimental appreciation of their diverse experiences whilst seeking to challenge stereotypical assumptions about disability and intellectual impairment. In the process of creating this new work we explored flying and falling and the in-between state of suspension. Driven by a desire to expose the intimacy of support, and the possibilities of surrender, we flung, krumped, collapsed and caught. The dancers wrote titles for an album of songs about life changing moments, they dressed up and down, and danced out of memories, risking everything and still moving beyond the fear of falling. Because the past is all we know of the future, they roll with their ghosts and catch their breath with the other.

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  • Seaunsea : An Interactive Performance

    Brown, Carol; Ramsgard-Thomsen, M; MacDonald, A; Mannion, M; Mottram, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography and Artistic Direction - Carol Brown Architecture and Interactive Design - Mette Ramsgard Thomsen Sound Design - Alastair MacDonald Programming - Chiron Mottram Lighting Design - Michael Mannion Premiered Dance Umbrella London, SeaUnSea was an evolving interactive performance for three dancers moving in response to and affecting a virtual seascape.Core to its development was the making of an intuitive interface through which the dancers could affect and respond to the digital scenography. Using a camera interface, mounted above the stage, the dancers are seen by a swarm of intelligent agents that navigate their way through a virtual space. The agents can be understood as a swarm of digital beings that interact with each other as well as react to changes in their environment. As they seek to navigate the plane, drawn by defined points of attraction, they are hindered by shades of darkness (the dancers digital shadow). In this way ‘the agents’ encounter the performers, at times evading, at times following and at other times being curious about their presence. The digital agents form vivid colour fields, assembling and dissolving creating cloud-like patterns around the performer/participant.Other artists exploring particle streams to extend the trace-form of the dancer include Trisha Brown, however this research as developed in SeaUnSea is original in its extension of this technology through the layering of a mesh architecture which embeds the time-based trace of the dancers’ presence.

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  • FLOOD in NZPQ15: Āhua o te Rangi, Prague Quadrennial of Performance Design and Space International Exhibition of Countries and Regions

    Hannah, D; Scoones, R; Erceg, L; Brown, Carol

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography by Carol Brown; performance design by Dorita Hannah; sound design by Russell Scoones; sculptural objects by Linda Erceg. Influenced by Maori and Pacific sacred places (marae), the Ahua o Te Rangi installation serves as an interaction, negotiation and display space that operates as an architecture piece, audiovisual media-site, live performance stage and dialogue exchange platform. FLOOD, the live performance, is re-presented within the exhibition through a video installation and sculptural form.

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  • Aarero Stone - Two Solos in a Performance Landscape

    Brown, Carol; Hannah, D; Scoones, R; Koronheo, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    How do we care for the strangely familiar and mourn the distant dead? The solo performance, Aarero Stone (2006) grew out of collaborative research into mythologies of stone and narratives of embodiment which express grief. European and Maori expressions of grief embodied in stone were researched through workshops in New Zealand and London. Through this research, processes of metamorphosis as embedded in mythology, geology and in digital processes were explored as a way to better understand and inhabit the changes we are experiencing in a new world order of global communications and terrorism. This enquiry followed a perceived shift in relations of meaning within art processes from metaphor to metamorphosis. Inspired by mentor, Marina Warner, I sought to explore metamorphosis as an energy and defining dynamic for change and transformation. The resulting choreography was described as 'spellbinding...an austere pageant of dance poetry...tragic, bold and clandestine.’ The Listener Dec 2007.

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  • 1000 Lovers

    Brown, Carol; Hannah, D; Scoones, R; Graham, F

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography - Carol Brown Design - Dorita Hannah Sound - Russell Scoones Dramaturgy - Fiona Graham Producer - Maximus Smitheram 1000 LOVERS is a performance that moves from sea to city through Auckland’s Wynyard Quarter. A cast of mythical characters – Tuna (an eel-man), Hine (his lover), a bride, a widow, and an urban tribe lead this journey. 1000 LOVERS draws its title from Auckland's Māori name Tāmaki Makaurau, which translates not only as 'Isthmus of one thousand lovers', but may also be understood as 'Tāmaki-the bride sought by a hundred suitors'. By re-enacting mythical, historical and everyday stories through music, design and dance the performance reveals hidden narratives and forgotten sites within this urban landscape. 1000 LOVERS follows a walkable route over a 50-minute timeframe, starting at Silo Park and ending on the steps of Karanga Plaza. The sound score provides an additional sensory layer to enhance this experience.

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