85 results for Craig, Elizabeth, Report

  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Counties Manukau (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Capital and Coast DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Canterbury and the West Coast (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Hawke's Bay (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Hutt Valley DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Midcentral DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Lakes DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Southern DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Taranaki (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Whanganui DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Northland (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Nelson Marlborough (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Waikato (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Waitemata DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Bay of Plenty (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Auckland DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Counties Manukau (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people. As a consequence, one of the key roles of the health sector remains ongoing advocacy on behalf of children and young people, in order to ensure that

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Canterbury (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people. As a consequence, one of the key roles of the health sector remains ongoing advocacy on behalf of children and young people, in order to ensure that

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Auckland (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people. As a consequence, one of the key roles of the health sector remains ongoing advocacy on behalf of children and young people, in order to ensure that they can access the resources they require to ensure their long term health and wellbeing.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Hutt Valley (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people.

    View record details