7 results for Douglas, C, Creative work

  • Canopy: proposal for Wynyard wharf. Auckland architecture week 09 invited design charette

    Young, E; Douglas, C; Richards, H; Xu, C; Fisher, CPRW (2011-10-20)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    As part of Auckland Architecture Week 09, a one-day invited design charette was held in a public venue in the Britomart Quarter. The charette was intended to show people what architects do, and to generate concepts for the Auckland City Council's intended redevelopment of the Wynyard Quarter. Teams were briefed at 8:30am, with the final presentation at 5:30pm. The brief called for open public space, retail, community facilities, offices, apartments, and a 'Big Idea' to activate the site. We proposed a non-destructive evolution of the existing fabric, beginning with some 'quick-and-dirty' temporary interventions to begin building community on the site. A layered canopy would be progressively built over the site for monolithic programmatic elements, with ground-level development maintaining a smaller urban grain to keep the existing working character of the site.

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  • Dynamic geometries. Te Wero bridge as a pacific monument

    Young, E; Davis, M; Douglas, C; Ceelen, V; Stevens, B; Phuong, DK; Jones, W; Fordham, F; Xu, C; Chou, W; Neville, H (2011-10-20)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Te Wero bridge re-interprets traditional notions of monumentality by projecting itself as a dynamic point of exchange. The bridge is a new kind of icon for Auckland. Positioned to articulate a subtle adjustment on the Quay St / Jellicoe St axis, it plays its part in a series of urban callings. It offers the challenge of arrival and departure, and sets up a continual dialogue between the city and Wynyard Quarter. Gently wavering masts respond to environmental shifts. On opening, the structure becomes taut, and the roadway rises to scribe an anthropomorphic arc. On closing, the bridge lowers itself back into place, gesturing a precise offering, and providing the necessary tolerance. The event is a study of poise and elegance. The bridge is structurally efficient, with its tensegrity tower, geometrically folded decks, and a gravity and spring-assisted cable and winch system. Te Wero bridge acts as a symbol of the First City of the Pacific not only by its physical presence, but through its articulation of what it means to be Pacific.

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  • Emily place kindergarten. Competition entry for Auckland Architecture Association Cavalier Bremworth Awards 10

    Douglas, C; Douglas, L (2011-10-20)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Auckland will densify, but Aucklanders are skeptical that quality of life can be maintained in a dense city. Proliferation of poor-quality city apartments has reinforced this skepticism. It is not enough to simply pack in more living quarters. For a viable, denser city, the whole range of urban and suburban programmes need to be reconsidered – the Ministry of Education, for example, has recently begun planning for an urban school in the central city. Kindergartens in New Zealand are a suburban typology, typically following the domestic pattern of house, verandah, and yard. Children learn to learn through play. Play is experimental and provisional engagement with other people, places, or things. Friedrich Fröbel, the instigator of the kindergarten movement, prescribed a series of tactile exercises aimed to help children develop spatial skills by slowing down perception. Emily Place Kindergarten is not a passive territory to be explored, but a dynamic system in which children participate. It is a space that children can affect; a medium for their developing sense of the world and their place in it.

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  • The Barricades Commission

    Douglas, C (2011-10-19)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    The initial drawing in this series was a response to the Auckland Architecture Association Urban Gaze 2006 competition, which invited spatial speculations on the city themed around the concept of the 'gift'. The work suggested, in line with Jacques Derrida's writing on gifts, that the truest gift was something without expectation of repayment, and that giving may overlap in strange ways with claiming. The drawing was awarded second prize. Along with two subsequent drawings, it became part of my research into barricading as a "redistribution of the sensible" (Rancière). The series won a contest on the high-profile website BLDGBLOG, and was published in Block, the newsletter of the Auckland Branch of the New Zealand Institute of Architects.

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  • Streaming. An intelligence agency for an unspecified city in a hot climate. Competition entry for Auckland Architecture Association Cavalier Bremworth Awards 06

    Douglas, C (2011-10-20)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    This competition entry for the AAA Cavalier Bremworth Awards 06 was an exploration of the use of pattern generation and interference patterns in generating operational architectural space. It sought to create strategic inefficiencies as a contribution to the capacity for imagination in the institution it housed. A in-situ cast concrete shell is proposed, which would be partitioned and filled in according to the specific needs of the agency (a sample program is given on the far right). The subtle misfitting of the heirarchical program and the concrete shell will promote mismatches and shortcuts through the hierarchy in an attempt to multiply the accidental meetings: noticing a piece of paper on someone's desk; meeting someone over the watercooler; double-bookings of meeting rooms; encounters in the corridor; one department overflowing into the next. The building is apprehended through circulation. It is not a building which shows you your place. Although local fixity may be found in the circles and niches, movement reveals the continual streaming-away of the architecture. The project built on techniques and processes I developed for my previous project "Offshore" (2004), which won a Open Category Award at the AAA Cavalier Bremworth Awards.

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  • Garden window. Public space for ambient intelligence. Competition entry for NTT DoCoMo, Inc. Mobile society research institute international architectural design competition 2006

    Douglas, C (2011-10-20)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Ambient intelligence is a public garden in which capabilities appear as flowers. This garden overlays the city precisely. We are all in two places at once: the city, and the garden of ambient intelligence. Keitai is a window for observing this other space. The most mundane and overlooked corners of the city blossom furiously! Flowers can be interacted with: to make a connection, to get some information. But the keitai can also be used to spy on the flowers interacting with each other - flourishing as their connections and abilities multiply.

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  • Panelbeating. Automotive landscape. Competition entry for Auckland Architecture Association Cavalier Bremworth awards '07

    Douglas, C; Douglas, L (2011-10-20)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Carparks are not to be thought of as simply service-spaces. Large carparks typically have distant corners which are rarely used for parking. These spaces take on another life, serving a range of complex functions: kicking it, demonstrating the volume of car audio systems, ghost-riding the whip, eating KFC, waiting up, showing off, making trademe meetings, performing minor repairs and upgrades. This project proposes a strategic excess of parking in order to allow for these events. Rather than a place to leave your car, this project provides a space which is inhabited in continual reference to the mobile space of the car. The site is located on Ti Rakau Drive in Pakuranga, a main arterial route to the Botany Downs shopping centre, and the rapid suburban developments of East Auckland. The area is dominated by vehicular traffic, big-box retail, and industry. The large scale of the site is unfriendly to pedestrians. A panelbeating shop is a sophisticated formal laboratory. Sheets of metal are shaped three-dimensionally through bending, hammering, moulding, routing, punching, denting. Aftermarket modification is often sneered at as an amateur pursuit, aesthetically unworthy. The technologies and formal strategies of car modification are used in this project to address the primarily surface-based condition of a carpark. Solar panel surfaces made from laminate of toughened glass and extruded photovoltaic sheets collect power for lighting. Future increases in efficiency of photovoltaics will allow recharging of electric vehicles. Plates are folded up into low islands and oriented to collect sunlight. Service masts made of folded and welded steel sheets provide lighting and patchy surveillance. Selected masts also incorporate self-service fuel pumps and recharge ports. Rubbish bins are recessed into the ground. Surface water is gathered into shallow puddles which become sheets of slightly oily water when it rains. When puddles reach a predetermined size they drain into a system of shallow channels and culverts cut into the parking surface and run off into tidal sedimentation basins. Mangroves trap anoxic sediment and prevent trace metals and contaminants from entering groundwater and waterways. The existing tidal creek at the north boundary has been dredged and extended into large tidal sedimentation basins which collect surface water. Sediment will accumulate as mangroves take hold, and the system will stabilise according to the amount of runoff.

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