6 results for ET AL., Creative work

  • Michael Parekowhai et al

    ET AL.; Parekowhai, M; Holloway, S; Henis, A

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The fundamental practice - regroup, reorder, restore!

    ET AL.

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    the fundamental practice – regroup, reorder, restore! continues a process of research and investigation, utilising techniques of procedure and presentation familiar from other ideological systems - scientific, military, political, revolutionary. The installation suggests a control-room for a diabolical plan, performing tests, provoking and alluding to the ideologies we are conditioned by and their structures of delivery. Data from the Venice experience has been collected, considered and assimilated into the project.

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  • the second of the ordinary practices & regroup, reorder, restore!

    ET AL.

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Site-specific installation linking art, technology, politcal ideologies, scientific theories, fringe religious practices and behavious modification. IMA receives major funding from Arts Queensland and the Australia Council and Artspace receives major funding from Creative New Zealand.

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  • that's obvious! that's right! that's true!

    ET AL.

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The collective et al. has exhibited widely both nationally and internationally to great acclaim. This exhibition continues their exploration of 'superfiction' by combining words, industrial furniture and video projections to create artworks that mirror political structures. The collective represented New Zealand at the 2005 Venice Biennale with its critically acclaimed installation the fundamental practice. Recent works have addressed fundamentalist practices and ideological schemes, and their impact on societies. The artists' approach is to use fiction and appropriation to mirror various political and belief structures. The work for Christchurch Art Gallery will continue this process of exploring aspects of super-fiction as conceptual and visual artworks.

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  • Interstitial zones: Historical facts, archaeologies of the present and dialectics of seeing

    ET AL.

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    ARG0S CENTRE FOR ART & MEDIA INTERSTITIAL ZONES Historical Facts, Archaeologies of the Present and Dialectics of Seeing An artist's work should not be viewed solely in terms of creation; it is also 3n act of resistance. But what does it mean to resist? Most of ail, it means to have the strength to de-create what exists, to de-create reality, to be stronger than what is already there. Giorgio Agamben In the media, historic events obey the laws of the media, They are simplified and misrepresented in single dimension, The false economics of current events and info-entertainment that govern the news grind reality up. Reality no longer has anywhere to flee. We see either cliches (the repetition and proliferation of the same thing, over and over) or we see nothing at all (discrimination against context and background, or censure). In both cases, there is a form of blindness whereby the world can no longer be looked at and the viewer is shipwrecked. The media knows only the here and now, that which is fleeting and bears no inner memory. The media shows facts over which we have no power. Interstitial Zones offers a critical alternative or opposing space, with the work of 15 artists and/or collectives that have sought out the crooks and crannies of postwar history that the mass media never reveal. The topics are diverse: The Red Army Faction or RAF, George Bush's inaugural speech, the Clinton-Lewinsky affair, 9/11, Iraq, the extra-legal regime of the Guantanamo Bay detention centre, the assault on Salvador Allende, Argentina's economic failure at the beginning of the millennium, the Gaza conflict, religious suicide attacks and so on. These specific historic events could equally be exchanged (or others. The rneta-narrative breaking up of the mechanisms of media representation and seeking out intervals make up the starting point of the exhibition. These intervals manifest themselves, for example, in voiceovers detached from the visual presentation, interchanging multiple time spans and the use of black or white monochrome images. As a result, a dialectic is set in motion between representations by the mass media on the one hand - with all the consequences for the way they take hold in our collective memories - and an ecological/iconoclastic position synonymous to the singularity of the artist on the other hand. Inherent to the interstitial space is the fact that it is a space of possibilities, a place where a new, different kind of visibility is put into effect. This is in part because of the visual mass found in the shadowed zones and off-screen spaces are upgraded, as well as through making us see with our ears. interstitial Zones wishes to make a stand against the politics of invisibility with which the media confront us on a daily basis. How can we possibly speak of 'images' when the surfeit of 'information' is such as it is? How might we again retrieve the rational from the emotional, the sensational? How do we touch on new political conditions if they continue, by definition, to be a blind spot for the media? The exhibition not only breaks open several decades of history by placing a distorted mirror before the mass media, it also focuses attention on that which transcends the moving image. It is now about the eclipse of politics and aspects of negative democracy, notably that which has increasingly pulled away from electoral legitimacy, Now, for example, does the threat of terror lead to such beyond-therules conditions as those at Guantanamo Bay, answering to no legal framework and avoiding all visibility? Due to the absence of any images from Guantanamo, the listing of the names of the detainees in the work of Gianni Motti transcends the purely memorial function. Together, the names constitute a virtual space that makes way for an imagining of the reality kept from public scrutiny, Using differing examples, the exhibition investigates interval spaces of this nature. The French language has the semantic attraction of offering a word play on the words voir and savoir, to see and to know, which did not escape Jean-Luc Godard. This same dialectic is also fundamental to the Interstitial Zones exhibition, where seeing is enclosed within knowing, in an ever-changing matrix of conscious and subconscious recollections. This means that the viewer has an active role in the exhibition. In contrast to the inherent character of television or film, the medium here does not disappear in what it permits us to see, but shows itself for what it is. The dialogue between different kinds of images provides an important place for that which cannot be visualized, but which is certainly conceivable.

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  • Art Unlimited, Art Basel 93

    ET AL.

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Integration of computing, multi-media and internet methods and techniques into contemporary art practice, will continue to be a focus in the current project. Using interactive and multi-media techniques in art disciplines effectively involves understanding and experimenting with the integration and interfacing of, computer generated material into the installation. The computer can act as a technical programmable interface either in the local scene of audio/visual disjunction or across a computer-based net installation to allow interaction that is not necessarily tied to specifics of time or place. Disjunction of object and reader happens across not only layered meanings and intentions but across disparate media and dislocated net-based media, further challenging the viewer/object-site interchange. Voices or positions are placed in opposition through the programming of voice and sound tracks. During the course of their programmed discussion, an enormous diversity of subjects is forced into a communal relationship through sound. These sound-subjects are utterances ??? voices with ideas, voices with beliefs, voices with conviction and meaning. Amplified in the exhibition space, they are in a state of literal disharmony, interfering and overlapping, out of sync and disagreeable. In addition, their words are foreign to each other; not just in geography, culture or religion, but also in subjects as diverse as art, science, philosophy, religion and cult activity. In their forced cohabitation, individual positions and meanings are somehow cancelled out as sound and idea compete for attention. Other specific areas addressed in this project will include ??? Newspapers, periodicals and tabloids as forms of mass dissemination. ??? Installation as identity ??? installation, publication and the archiving of societal events. ??? Aleatoric scripting ??? random sonic phenomena using statistical procedures

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